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2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
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2012 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack

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  • 1. Employer-Sponsored Health CoverageRelease SlidesTuesday, September 11, 2012March 15, 2013
  • 2. Cumulative Increases in Health Insurance Premiums, Workers’Contributions to Premiums, Inflation, and Workers’ Earnings,1999-201238%109%172%38%113%180%11%29%47%8%24%38%0%20%40%60%80%100%120%140%160%180%200%1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Health Insurance PremiumsWorkers Contribution to PremiumsWorkers EarningsOverall InflationSOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Price Index,U.S. City Average of Annual Inflation (April to April), 1999-2012; Bureau of Labor Statistics, Seasonally Adjusted Data from theCurrent Employment Statistics Survey, 1999-2012 (April to April).
  • 3. Cumulative Increases in Family Health Insurance Premiums,2002-2007 and 2007-201251%30%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%2002-2007 2007-2012SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2002-2012.
  • 4. * Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012.Average Annual Premiums for Single and Family Coverage,1999-2012$15,745*$15,073*$13,770*$13,375*$12,680*$12,106*$11,480*$10,880*$9,950*$9,068*$8,003*$7,061*$6,438*$5,791*$5,615*$5,429*$5,049*$4,824*$4,704*$4,479*$4,242*$4,024*$3,695*$3,383*$3,083*$2,689*$2,471*$2,196$0 $2,000 $4,000 $6,000 $8,000 $10,000 $12,000 $14,000 $16,000 $18,00020122011201020092008200720062005200420032002200120001999Single CoverageFamily Coverage
  • 5. $5,588$848$15,253$5,134$5,628$1,001$15,980$3,926$0$2,000$4,000$6,000$8,000$10,000$12,000$14,000$16,000$18,000Premium Worker Contribution* Premium* Worker Contribution*All Small Firms (3-199 Workers)All Large Firms (200 or More Workers)Single Coverage Family CoverageAverage Annual Worker Premium Contributions and TotalPremiums for Covered Workers, Single and Family Coverage,by Firm Size, 2012* Estimates are statistically different between All Small Firms and All Large Firms (p<.05).SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012.
  • 6. Average Annual Worker Contributions for Covered Workerswith Family Coverage, by Firm Size, 1999-2012* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012.$1,831$1,940$2,254*$2,647*$2,970$3,382*$3,170$3,550$4,236*$4,101$4,204$4,665$5,134$1,398 $1,453 $1,551$1,893*$2,146*$2,340*$2,487$2,658$2,831$2,982$3,182$3,652*$3,926$0$1,000$2,000$3,000$4,000$5,000$6,0001999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012All Small Firms (3-199 Workers)All Large Firms (200 or More Workers)$4,946$3,755
  • 7. $4,977* $3,968*$9,716 * $12,459 *$0$2,000$4,000$6,000$8,000$10,000$12,000$14,000$16,000$18,000Many Workers are Lower-WageMany Workers are Higher-WageFamily Coverage$14,694*$16,427*Average Worker and Employer Premium Contributions For CoveredWorkers at Higher- and Lower-Wage Firms, 2012*Estimate for many workers are lower-wage is statistically different from estimate for many workers are higher-wage, within coverage type (p<.05).NOTE: Firms with many lower-wage workers are ones where 35% or more of employees earn $24,000 or less. Firms with many higher-wage workersare ones where 35% or more of employees earn $55,000 or more. Wage cutoffs are the inflation adjusted- 25th and 75th percentile of national wagesaccording to the National Compensation Survey: Occupational Earnings in the United States, 2010. 1% of covered workers are in firms which areboth high income and low income, excluding these firms does not change the estimates or significance testing.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012. National Compensation Survey: Occupational Earnings in theUnited States, 2010. http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ocs/sp/nctb1489.pdf$1,069 $964$4,066*$4,825*$0$1,000$2,000$3,000$4,000$5,000$6,000$7,000Many Workers are Lower-WageMany Workers are Higher-WageSingle Coverage$5,135*$5,789*Worker Premium ContributionEmployer Premium Contribution
  • 8. 66%71%47%82%84%69%0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%Percentage of Workers Eligible ForHealth Benefits Offered By Their Employer*Percentage of Eligible Workers Who Participatein Their Employers’ Plan (Take-Up Rate)*Percentage of Workers Covered by TheirEmployers’ Health Benefits*Many Workers areHigher-WageMany Workers areLower-WageEligibility, Take-Up Rate, and Coverage in Firms Offering HealthBenefits, by Firm Wage Level, 2012*Estimate for many workers are lower-wage is statistically different from estimate for many workers are higher-wage (p<.05).NOTE: Firms with many lower-wage workers are ones where 35% or more of employees earn $24,000 or less. Firms with many higher-wage workersare ones where 35% or more of employees earn $55,000 or more. Wage cutoffs are the inflation adjusted- 25th and 75th percentile of national wagesaccording to the National Compensation Survey: Occupational Earnings in the United States, 2010. 1% of covered workers are in firms which areboth high income and low income.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012. National Compensation Survey: Occupational Earningsin the United States, 2010. http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ocs/sp/nctb1489.pdf.
  • 9. 44%*29%*0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50%Many Workers are Lower-Wage Many Workers are Higher-WagePercentage of Covered Workers Enrolled in a Plan with a GeneralAnnual Deductible of $1,000 or More for Single Coverage, by FirmWage Level, 2012*Estimate for many workers are lower-wage is statistically different from estimate for many workers are higher-wage (p<.05).NOTE: Firms with many lower-wage workers are ones where 35% or more of employees earn $24,000 or less. Firms with many higher-wage workersare ones where 35% or more of employees earn $55,000 or more. Wage cutoffs are the inflation adjusted- 25th and 75th percentile of national wagesaccording to the National Compensation Survey: Occupational Earnings in the United States, 2010. 1% of covered workers are in firms which areboth high income and low income, excluding these firms does not change the estimates or significance testing.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012. National Compensation Survey:Occupational Earnings in the United States, 2010. http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ocs/sp/nctb1489.pdf.
  • 10. Grandfathering under the Affordable Care Act (ACA),2011 and 2012* Estimate is statistically different between 2011 and 2012 (p<.05).SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011-2012.72%56%58%48%0%20%40%60%80%Percentage of Firms withAt Least One Grandfathered Plan*Percentage of Covered Workersin a Grandfathered Health Plan*2011 2012
  • 11. Number of Adult Children Who Enrolled in a Parent’s Health PlanBecause of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), In Millions, by FirmSize, 2011 and 20120.71.62.31.11.82.9-0.51.01.52.02.53.03.5All Small Firms(3-199 Workers)All Large Firms(200 or More Workers)All Firms*InMillions2011 2012* Estimate is statistically different between 2011 and 2012 (p<.05).NOTE: In 2011 firms who did not know if they enrolled adult children due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were not imputed. If a similar approach hadbeen followed in 2012, an estimated 2.8 million children would have enrolled on a parents health plan due to the Affordable Care Act. Using eitherapproach the 2012 estimate is a significant increase over 2011. In 2012, 5% of firms offering family coverage did not know whether they enrolledadult dependents due to the ACA, more than the 1% in 2011. In 2012, 68% of workers covered by employer health benefits were employed atlarge firms.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011-2012.
  • 12. 66%68% 68%66% 66%63%60% 61%59%63%59%69%*60%* 61%55% 57% 58% 58%55%52%47%49%45%50%47%59%*48%*50%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012All FirmsFirms with 3-9 WorkersPercentage of All Firms Offering Health Benefits, 1999-2012*Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).NOTE: Estimates presented in this exhibit are based on the sample of both firms that completed the entire survey and those thatanswered just one question about whether they offer health benefits. The percentage of firms offering health benefits is largely driven bysmall firms. The large increase in 2010 was primarily driven by a 12 percentage point increase in offering among firms with 3 to 9workers. In 2011, 48% of firms with 3 to 9 employees offer health benefits, a level more consistent with levels from recent years otherthan 2010. The overall 2011 offer rate is consistent with the long term trend, indicating that the high 2010 offer rate may be anaberration.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012.
  • 13. <1%1%1%1%2%3%3%3%5%5%4%7%8%10%27%46%73%16%17%19%20%20%21%20%21%25%24%27%24%29%28%31%21%16%56%55%58%60%58%57%60%61%55%54%52%46%42%39%28%26%11%9%10%8%10%12%13%13%15%15%17%18%23%21%24%14%7%19%17%13%8%8%5%4%20122011201020092008200720062005200420032002200120001999199619931988Conventional HMO PPO POS HDHP/SONOTE: Information was not obtained for POS plans in 1988. A portion of the change in plan type enrollment for 2005 is likely attributableto incorporating more recent Census Bureau estimates of the number of state and local government workers and removing federalworkers from the weights. See the Survey Design and Methods section from the 2005 Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored HealthBenefits for additional information.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012; KPMG Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits,1993, 1996; The Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA), 1988.Distribution of Health Plan Enrollment for Covered Workers, byPlan Type, 1988-2012
  • 14. Among Firms Offering Health Benefits, Percentage That Offeran HDHP/SO, 2005-20124%7%10%13%11%15%23%31%0%10%20%30%40%50%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012NOTE: Tests found no statistical difference from the previous year shown (p<.05). The 2012 estimate includes 0.6% of all firms offeringhealth benefits that offer both an HDHP/HRA and an HSA-qualified HDHP. The comparable percentages for previous years are: 2005[0.3%], 2006 [0.4%], 2007 [0.2%], 2008 [0.3%], 2009 [<0.1%], 2010 [0.3%], and 2011[1.8%].SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2005-2012.
  • 15. 16%21%*35%*40%46%50% 49%6%8% 9%13%*17%22%*26%10%12%*18%*22%*27%*31%34%0%10%20%30%40%50%2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012All Small Firms (3-199 Workers)All Large Firms (200 or More Workers)All Firms* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).NOTE: These estimates include workers enrolled in HDHP/SO and other plan types. Because we do not collect information on theattributes of conventional plans, to be conservative, we assumed that workers in conventional plans do not have a deductible of $1,000or more. Because of the low enrollment in conventional plans, the impact of this assumption is minimal. Average general annual healthplan deductibles for PPOs, POS plans, and HDHP/SOs are for in-network services.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2006-2012.Percentage of Covered Workers Enrolled in a Plan with a GeneralAnnual Deductible of $1,000 or More for Single Coverage, By FirmSize, 2006-2012
  • 16. Among All Large Firms (200 or More Workers) Offering HealthBenefits to Active Workers, Percentage of Firms Offering RetireeHealth Benefits, 1988-201266%46%36%40% 40% 40%34%37%35% 36% 35%32%34%32%29% 28%26% 26% 25%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%1988 1991 1993 1995 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012NOTE: Tests found no statistical difference from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05). No statistical tests are conducted for yearsprior to 1999.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012; KPMG Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits,1991, 1993, 1995, 1998; The Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA), 1988.
  • 17. Percentage of Covered Workers in Partially or Completely Self-Funded Plans, 1999-201244%49% 49% 49%52%54% 54% 55% 55% 55%57%59% 60% 60%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012NOTE: Tests found no statistical difference from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2012.
  • 18. Among Firms Offering and Not Offering Health Benefits,Percentage of Firms Offering Flexible Spending Accounts andPre-Tax Employee Premium Contributions, By Firm Size, 2012* Estimate is statistically different between All Small Firms and All Large Firms within category (p<.05).NOTE: Section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code permits employees to pay for health insurance premiums with pre-tax dollars. Section125 also allows the establishment of flexible spending accounts (FSAs). An FSA allows employees to set aside funds on a pre-tax basisto pay for medical expenses not covered by health insurance. Typically, employees decide at the beginning of the year how much to setaside in an FSA, and their employer deducts that amount from the employee’s paycheck over the year. Funds set aside in an FSA must beused by the end of the year or are forfeited by the employee. FSAs are different from HRAs and HSAs. Nineteen percent of firmsresponded “not applicable” when asked if they allow the establishment of a section 125 plan. For example, some firms may pay for 100percent of the cost of coverage.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012.17%41%76%91%18%42%0%20%40%60%80%100%FSA* Pre-Tax Premium Payments*All Small Firms (3-199 Workers) All Large Firms (200 or More Workers) All Firms
  • 19. Among Firms Offering Health Benefits, Percentage of Firms Offeringa Wellness Program and Asking Employees to Complete a HealthRisk Assessment, By Firm Size, 2012* Estimate is statistically different between All Small Firms and All Large Firms within category (p<.05).NOTE: A health risk assessment includes questions about medical history, health status, and lifestyle and is designed to identify the health risks of theperson being assessed.‡ Among firms offering employees the option to complete a health risk assessment. The estimate for small firms is not reported because of the highstandard error associated with this estimate. Although 19 percent of small firms that ask their employees to complete a health risk assessment reportedthat they offer a financial incentive, the relative standard error is 0.36, which indicates considerable uncertainty. The difference between large and smallfirms is statistically significant at the 0.05 confidence level.~ Includes the following wellness programs: weight loss programs, biometric screenings, gym membership discounts or on-site exercise facilities, smokingcessation program, lifestyle or behavioral coaching, classes in nutrition or healthy living, web-based resources for healthy living, or a wellness newsletter.^Among Firms Offering Health and Wellness Benefits. Any financial incentive indicates firms that offer employees who participate in wellnessprograms one of the following incentives: smaller premium contributions, smaller deductibles, higher HRA or HSA contributions, or gift cards,travel, merchandise, or cash.SOURCE: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012.63%*10%*18%*94%*41%* 38%*63%63%11%18%0%20%40%60%80%100%Offer at Least OneSpecified WellnessProgram~Any Financial Incentive toPartcipate in WellnessProgram^Ask Employees toComplete a Health RiskAssessmentOffer Financial Incentivesto Employees WhoComplete an Assessment‡All Small Firms (3-199 Workers)All Large Firms (200 or More Workers)All Firms

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