Pepeke Henua Presentation

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This presentation was created to present our final group project for ETEC 613 in Spring 2011.

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  • Aloha `ahi `ahi Mahalo for attending our presentation tonight. Our instructional design is Pepeke Henua, a location sentence structure in the Hawaiian Language. Our group members are Melissa, Kahea, Kehau and myself.
  • Briefly read the agenda list. 
  • Tonight’s `olelo is…. POLL: How many of you are aware that the Hawaiian Language is an official language in Hawai`i and recognized by the US Gov? YES or NO?
  • The purpose of the Units is to learn how to formulate a basic pepeke henua or location sentence by designing lessons which scaffold upon each other. As in all languages, sentence structure is essential. Beginning ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i students learn many different types of sentence structures or pepeke. This instruction was designed to provide the necessary tools for constructing a basic pepeke henua (locational sentence) to University of Hawai‘i college students enrolled in a beginning ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i course.
  • As we have been learning over the last two semesters, when designing instruction, we ask ourselves, which model will we use to design the instruction? In this case, Peter had us use….NEXT slide…
  • … the Dick & Carey Systems Approach. This is the model we used to determine the Design Components of our Instruction
  • There are several components to design. Last semester, ETEC600, we learned about needs assessments. We first identified a need (problem) and determined a rationale for the instruction. What is it specifically that our learners need to know? What is the desired outcome?
  • Identifying the need and rationale provided a foundation for our instructional goal. Given an instructional worksheet, the undergraduate student enrolled in a beginning Hawaiian Language course will be able to formulate a basic pepeke henua (locational sentence).
  • Next, we analyzed the learners and context to distinguish our target population. At this time, they are like shadows and we need to define them better and in many ways, put faces to our learners. Kehau will provide more detail about our target audience shortly.
  • The next several activities proved to be some of the most difficult for our group. It required ALL of our gears to work hard and we found ourselves revising along the way as we gained a better perspective of the instruction. DOMAIN OF LEARNING = COGNITIVE The instructional analysis was derived in large part by academic and/or personal experiences by our team members. However, there is a specific structure to follow. What is the required outcome to achieve our goal? The learner will be able to formulate a pepeke henua (locational sentence). 4 major steps **Sub-steps **Sub-skills Cognitive Strategies - scaffolding
  • We used the top – down format that Peter suggested to design our hierarchy chart Terminal objective = Problem solving Steps = Rules Sub-steps = Concepts Sub-skills = Discriminations EL behavior
  • At this point, we were able to begin writing our performance objectives. We used the ABCD format, audience, behavior, condition, and degree. OBSERVABLE VERBS One of the most challenging aspects of this section was determining the appropriate verb to use and to be clear about the degree of the performance objective. We had several drafts and revisions before the final objectives were determined.
  • After the performance objectives were complete, we began determining assessment instruments. We chose, multiple choice questions and parallelism for our assessment instruments, as addressed in our CAR and implemented in our Module Prototype.
  • Methods (Activities) – Description, Examples vs Non-examples, Lesson Check, Answer & Feedback Learning environment – F2F
  • Once the assessments were done….NEXT SLIDE
  • We understand an evaluation process is critical, so thank you to our fellow classmates, TA, and Peter -we received valuable feedback….NEXT SLIDE
  • … to make improvements before implementing our module prototype.
  • Let’s review our terminal goal
  • All of the planning process came together as we synthesized each component.
  • To design our module prototype, we needed to choose a cluster from our hierarchy chart. Kehau will share how we did that.
  • Undergraduates at a University of Hawai’i System Ages 17 to over 65 years ol Distinctive Multi-Ethnic mix Varying socioeconomic backgrounds Attain and Utilize Information
  • Personal interests in the language and culture of Hawaii Pre-requisite course to fulfill University requirements No prior knowledge of Hawaiian language Cognitive level is age appropriate
  • How does this affect the instruction? Knowledge acquisition: scaffolding of vocabulary and pronunciation Instructional materials and pedagogy include imagery, modeling, questioning, guided feedback, coaching  Engage in social interaction to practice oral as well as written skills Celebration and appreciation of ‘ohana will be thematic through out instruction to derive relevance and personal connection
  • All tests are multiple-choice Pre- and post-tests prior to module to measure strengths and weaknesses, as well as whether the instruction is necessary Embedded tests: determine new concepts learned include answer key with immediate feedback
  • Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction: gaining attention (reception)       Motivation: (2) informing learners of the objective (expectancy) Examples and Non-Examples (3) stimulating recall of prior learning (retrieval) (4) presenting the stimulus (selective perception)
  • Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction: (5) providing learning guidance (semantic encoding) (6) eliciting performance (responding) (7) providing feedback (reinforcement)
  • Our module prototype contained the following sections.
  • Our module prototype contained the following sections.
  • In addition, each section contained 6 parts.
  • In addition, each section contained 6 parts.
  • In addition, each section contained 6 parts.
  • In addition, each section contained 6 parts.
  • In addition, each section contained 6 parts.
  • In addition, each section contained 6 parts.
  • In our module we used olelo noeau (traditional hawaiian sayings) to motivate our students.
  • We also use the image of a shaka as a motivator
  • And included the shaka image with motivating text at the end of each lesson
  • And included the shaka image with motivating text at the end of each lesson
  • And included the shaka image with motivating text at the end of each lesson
  • And included the shaka image with motivating text at the end of each lesson
  • And included the shaka image with motivating text at the end of each lesson
  • And included the shaka image with motivating text at the end of each lesson
  • Using motivation ‘ olelo no`eau Shaka Clean & Neat Layout Boxing the objectives To focus learner on key information for the lesson Having Examples & No Examples on the same page to give the learner a direct contrast Clear & Crisp Images to support lesson points Using headers to orientate the learner Since lessons flow through a number of pages Lesson Checks (embedded questions)
  • The purpose of the Units is to learn how to formulate a basic pepeke henua or location sentence by designing lessons which scaffold upon each other.   To help with memorization, a visual mnemonic was introduced. Visualizing a he‘e or octopus body will help you see the different parts of the pepeke. Po‘o (head) + Piko (body) + ‘Awe (tentacles)  
  • Module Prototype testing – One on one and small groups
  • Pepeke Henua Presentation

    1. 1. Pepeke Henua Instructional Design University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa ETEC 613 Spring 2011 Instructional Design and DevelopmentLaureen Kodani, Melissa Kunitzer, Davileigh Nae‘ole, Jayneen Souza
    2. 2. Pepeke Henua Agenda‘Olelo No‘eauContent AnalysisModule PrototypeFormative EvaluationSummary & Conclusion
    3. 3. ‘Olelo No‘eau ‘A ‘ohe hana nui ke alu ‘iaNo task is too big when done together by all.
    4. 4. Pepeke Henua Agenda‘Olelo No‘eauContent AnalysisModule PrototypeFormative EvaluationSummary & Conclusion
    5. 5. Instructional Design Model Which model will we use to design our instruction?
    6. 6. Instructional Design Model Dick & Carey Model Revise instruction Conduct instructionalAssess analysis needs Design and to Develop and conductidentify Write Develop Develop select formativegoal(s) performance assessment instructional instructional evaluation of obectives instruments strategy materials instruction Analyze learners and context Design and conduct summative evaluation of instruction
    7. 7. Content Analysis Design ComponentsIdentify Instructional Goal(s) Need and Rationale Instructional Goal
    8. 8. Content Analysis Design ComponentsIdentify Instructional Goal(s) Need and Rationale Instructional Goal
    9. 9. Content Analysis Design Components Analyze Target Population  Learners  Context
    10. 10. Content Analysis Design ComponentsInstructional Analysis – Intellectual Skill4 major steps Determine po‘o Determine piko Determine ‘awe Arrange in correct order
    11. 11. Hierarchy
    12. 12. Content Analysis Design ComponentsPerformance ObjectivesAssessment Instruments
    13. 13. Content Analysis Design ComponentsPerformance ObjectivesAssessment Instruments
    14. 14. Content Analysis Design ComponentsInstructional Strategy Methods (Activities) Learning Environment
    15. 15. Content Analysis Design ComponentsAssessmentsEvaluationImprovements
    16. 16. Content Analysis Design ComponentsAssessmentsEvaluationImprovements
    17. 17. Content Analysis Design ComponentsAssessmentsEvaluationImprovements
    18. 18. Content Analysis Goal Given an instructional worksheet, theundergraduate student enrolled in a beginning Hawaiian Language course will be able to formulate a basic pepeke henua (locational sentence).
    19. 19. Content Analysis Synthesize
    20. 20. Content AnalysisCluster for our Module Prototype
    21. 21. Hierarchy & Cluster
    22. 22. Cluster
    23. 23. Content Analysis Target Population  UH Undergraduates  Ages 17 to over 65  Distinctive Multi-Ethnic Mix  Varying Socioeconomic
    24. 24. Content Analysis Target Population Audience Analysis Personal Interest University Requirements No Prior Knowledge College Level Skills
    25. 25. Content Analysis Target Population Implications Scaffolding Imagery and Modeling Engaging Celebration and Appreciation
    26. 26. Content Analysis Tests Multiple Choice Pre-test Measure Embedded Test Post-test
    27. 27. Content Analysis Instructional Strategy Gagne’s Nine Events Gaining Attention Informing Learners Stimulating Recall Presenting Stimulus
    28. 28. Content Analysis Instructional Strategy Gagne’s Nine Events Providing Guidance Eliciting Performance Providing Feedback Assessing Performance Enhancing Retention & Transfer
    29. 29. Pepeke Henua Agenda‘Olelo No‘eauContent AnalysisModule PrototypeFormative EvaluationSummary & Conclusion
    30. 30. Module PrototypeIntroduction`Ōlelo No`eauPre testLessons 1 - 5Post testConclusion
    31. 31. Module PrototypeIntroduction`Ōlelo No`eauPre testLessons 1 - 5Post testConclusion
    32. 32. Module PrototypeIntroduction`Ōlelo No`eauPre testLessons 1 - 5Post testConclusion
    33. 33. Module PrototypeIntroduction`Ōlelo No`eauPre testLessons 1 - 5Post testConclusion
    34. 34. Module PrototypeIntroduction`Ōlelo No`eauPre testLessons 1 - 5Post testConclusion
    35. 35. Module PrototypeIntroduction`Ōlelo No`eauPre testLessons 1 - 5Post testConclusion
    36. 36. Module Prototype Introduction `Ōlelo No`eau Pre testLessons 1 - 5 Post test Conclusion
    37. 37. Module Prototype Introduction `Ōlelo No`eau Pre testLessons 1 - 5 Post test Conclusion
    38. 38. Module Prototype Introduction `Ōlelo No`eau Pre testLessons 1 - 5 Post test Conclusion
    39. 39. Module Prototype Introduction `Ōlelo No`eau Pre testLessons 1 - 5 Post test Conclusion
    40. 40. Module Prototype Introduction `Ōlelo No`eau Pre testLessons 1 - 5 Post test Conclusion
    41. 41. Module Prototype Introduction `Ōlelo No`eau Pre testLessons 1 - 5 Post test Conclusion
    42. 42. Module Prototype Highlights Motivation `Ōlelo No`eau ‘ike hana ka arns.Ma ka ng one le kiIn wor u‘u . i ka n he highest. ālau E kū l ia t ike i ka h to reach pa u ka ‘ Strive A‘ohe i. d in ah t learne ho‘ok ledge is no w All kno school. e just on
    43. 43. Module Prototype HighlightsMotivation `Ōlelo No`eau  Shaka
    44. 44. Module Prototype HighlightsMotivation `Ōlelo No`eau  Shaka
    45. 45. Module Prototype Highlights Using headers
    46. 46. Module Prototype Highlights Boxing Objectives
    47. 47. Module Prototype HighlightsSame page for examples & non-examples Examples
    48. 48. Module Prototype HighlightsSame page for examples & non-examples
    49. 49. Module Prototype HighlightsSame page for examples & non-examples
    50. 50. Module Prototype Highlights Lesson Checks
    51. 51. Pepeke Henua Agenda‘Olelo No‘eauContent AnalysisModule PrototypeFormative EvaluationSummary & Conclusion
    52. 52. Formulative Evaluation Method Student Attributes 4 Beginning Hawaiian Language Students 18-65 years 2 Female and 2 Male Completion Time 30 – 45 minutes
    53. 53. Formulative Evaluation Method Procedure  One-on-One Testing  Observation  Oral and written comments  Body language  Expression  Talk Alouds
    54. 54. Summative Evaluation Results Post-Test  Three subjects - 4 out of 5  One subject – 2 out of 5 Other observations  Visual helpers or drawings  Notes in margins and back of paper  Marking important sections
    55. 55. Evaluation Summary What is working well…  Good use of color and white space  Pictures worked for visual stimuli  Examples and Non-examples on same page  Reviewing examples and lessons  Good use of BOLD and italics  Format
    56. 56. Evaluation Summary We need to fix…  Problem: Not enough room for notes  Problem: Page border and lines are distracting  Problem: Need explanation for pre and post-test  Problem: Inconsistent test questions
    57. 57. Evaluation Summary Next time, we should… Problem: Not enough room for notes Solution: W I D E R margins Problem: Page border and lines are distracting Solution: Eliminate border and lines
    58. 58. Evaluation Summary Next time, we should… Problem: Explanation for pre and post-test Solution: Provide purpose descriptions Problem: Inconsistent test questions Solution: Provide consistent test questions
    59. 59. Evaluation Summary Let’s keep using… Revise instruction Conduct instructionalAssess analysis needs Design and to Develop and conductidentify Write Develop Develop select formativegoal(s) performance assessment instructional instructional evaluation of obectives instruments strategy materials instruction Analyze learners and context Design and conduct summative evaluation of instruction
    60. 60. Evaluation Summary Let’s keep using… Consistency and parallelism Color and white space Font effects for emphasis Graphics
    61. 61. Evaluation Summary Added $$$ and time, let’s have… Computer assisted module Audio or video classes  Pronunciation classes  Augmented reality  Assisted multiple choice questions
    62. 62. Evaluation Summary Added $$$ and time, let’s have… Animated graphics Gratification if right Gentle leading if wrong
    63. 63. Evaluation Summary Added $$$ and time, let’s have… More module prototype testing Story line Employ an illustrator Employ an SME More lesson checks
    64. 64. Pepeke Henua Ua pau [All done] Ninau? [Question?]
    65. 65. Pepeke Henua Mahalo!

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