July august 2012 newsletter
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July august 2012 newsletter

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    July august 2012 newsletter July august 2012 newsletter Document Transcript

    • July/august 2012 Summer is Anything but Lazy. Between Kid Activities, Festivals, Picnics and BBQs, Who has Time to be Lazy? And When You’re in the Military PCS Moves Happen....During the Summer! Here are some tips when moving with a special needs family member: Excerpt from: EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS/School Age/ Military & Family Policy1. Review general information about your new location at Military- HOMEFRONT’s Military Installations page (http:// www.militaryinstallations.dod.mil/).2. Notify your current service coordinator (EFMP System Navigators, Sue and Michelle at ACS) that you will be leaving and where you will be going so they can begin preparing for your transition.3. Use a 3-ring binder or other type of notebook to organize your child’s records and other pertinent information (go to www.MilitaryOneSource.com and click on resources, order your FREE S.C.O.R. (Special Care Organizational Record) for Children with Special Healthcare Needs binder).4. Make sure that you have paper copies of your Family Member’s: Most recent transcripts and grade reports Most recent eligibility reports where your child was determined eligi- ble for5. Special education Current and past individual education programs (IEP), including quarterly Progress reports Special education assessment reports, including: School psychology; Occupational or Physical Therapy; Speech-Language Pathology; other reports contained in the special education file Names of particular textbooks or other materials that were effective for your family member Medical reports If applicable, reports from service providers not connected to school, such as a private therapist Inoculation records to ensure your child can be enrolled on arrival Prescriptions for medications and dosages (or a 90 day supply).
    • SOME ADDITIONAL THINGS TO DO TO Sample Questions to Ask: ensure A SMOOTH TRANSITION: Whom should I contact at the school when we arrive in our new Ask your child’s classroom and/or special education teacher location? to write a brief narrative about your child’s current educa- tional program that you can share with the staff at your What release of information forms should I sign before leaving child’s new school. my current location? Keep the name and contact information (phone, e-mail) of What consent and release of information forms will I need to your child’s current teacher in case you have questions after sign when I arrive? you or the staff at your new school have questions; What information should I bring with me or provide you before Visit http://www.militaryhomefront.dod.mil/12038/EFMP/ we arrive? EFMP_Directory/DOD_ED_School_Age.pdf. Use the in- Can I fax/e-mail you a copy of my child’s IEP to help you pre- formation provided in Section 4: School District Profiles to pare for his/her arrival? identify and learn more about districts that serve your new location. Will my child’s IEP be implemented as currently written when he/she arrives at school? Contact the special education director in the school district to which you are considering moving to learn specific infor- What types of Evidence-Based Practices does your district use? mation about the programs they provide. The installation’s Do my child’s teachers have experience and training for working EFMP System Navigator will have this information. with children with my child’s disability? Provide the staff at your child’s current school the contact Will my child’s teacher (s) be willing to e-mail me weekly pro- information (phone, e-mail) of a contact person at your gress updates? child’s new school to facilitate the transfer of information. If my child requires transportation, how will that be provided Contact the School Liaison Officer and Exceptional Family and coordinated? Member Program (EFMP) System Navigator at your new installation to learn more about the school district. Where will my child be served- in the regular classroom, a pull- out or self-contained program, or in a separate building? Whenever you talk with someone regarding your child’s transition to a new district, it is helpful to write down the Will my child be able to participate in elective classes such as time, date, and person to whom you spoke, as well as some Art, Music, and PE? brief notes. Is there a local support group for families with children with If you are moving during the summer, try to contact your disabilities? new school district at least 2 weeks before you arrive to help Whom should I contact at the school district if I have issues re- ensure that preparations have been made to implement your lated to my child’s program? child’s program before the first day of school. Sometimes my child doesn’t seem to ―fit in‖ – how will the Review your educational rights under IDEA. You should school help improve his/her social skills? have received a copy of your rights from your current school, but you can also request a copy at any time. A gen- What happens if my child’s unusual or quirky behavior is misin- eral description of these rights is provided by the Technical terpreted as rule-breaking? Assistance Alliance for Parent Centers (http:// www.taalliance.org/publications/pdfs/all17.pdf). My child might, if upset, try to run or leave the building – how will he/she be kept safe?Additional information can be found at: http://www.militaryhomefront.dod.mil/12038/EFMP/EFMP_Directory/DOD_ED_School_Age.pdf
    • Military Lodging may be the Way To Go... Excerpt from www.militaryonesource.mil—Family and Recreation Page With a little research, you can find out about military lodging in the area you want to visit, including amenities and reservation policies.  Finding the right military lodging facility for your next vacation may require some re- search. Military Living publishes Temporary Military Lodging Around the World, a compre- hensive listing of military lodging facilities, with contact information, directions, and local attractions. (It may be available at your installation exchange or, for more information, visit www.militaryliving.com or call 1-703-237-0203.)  Military lodging and service branch Web sites can also provide specific information on installation and recreational lodging. Army MWR: www.armymwr.com; Navy Lodges: www.navy-lodge.com; Marine Corps Community Services: www.usmc-mccs.org/lodging/; Air Force Services: dodlodging.net (This site also include links to Army, Navy and Marine Corps lodging.)  Most of the popular recreational facilities and resorts book up months in advance. If you plan to visit during peak vacation periods, find out when reservations can be made and make them as soon as possible. Some lodging facilities prioritize their reservations by branch of service, by duty station, or by status. While youre there, take advantage of the leisure services. Many recreation centers and re- sorts offer -- such as restaurants, boat rentals, ski equipment rental, area tours, and dis- count tickets to area attractions. Familiarize yourself with what types of services are avail- able and if reservations need to be made in advance. Taking advantage of these savings will help cut costs and help make your vacation an enjoyable experience for the whole family.Bee Stings and Wasp Stings Tick Bites Mosquito BitesWarm weather brings out bees and wasps, Tiny ticks can transmit nasty Depending on how sensitive you are,and bee stings and wasp stings are potential illnesses, including Lyme dis- a mosquito bite can leave you with ansources of trouble for those who are allergic. ease and bacterial infections, itchy bump or a large welt. And as they feed on their host’s unless you’re able to swat away yourAn allergic reaction can range from itchy blood, putting both you and attacker, it will bite in a cluster onhives to a very dangerous condition called your pets at risk. your exposed skin, leaving a numberanaphylaxis, which requires a self- Some tick bites hurt, others may not be felt of bumps or welts.administered injection of epinephrine. If you at all — and you may never even see a tick Though its rare, mosquitoes canare not allergic, bee stings will most often even though you’ve been bitten. A skin rash spread the West Nile virus. If this isheal by themselves. in the pattern of rings, much like a bull’s-eye the case, 5 to 15 days after youre on a target, is a symptom of Lyme disease. bitten, you may experience head-To relieve pain and itching and prevent infec- It can appear up to a month after the tick aches, body aches, fever, swollention, remove the stinger and apply an ice bite. glands, and a skin rash.pack to the area for 15 to 20 minutes once Protect yourself from tick bites by wearing Mosquitoes are most active fromper hour for the first 6 hours. Elevating the long-sleeved shirts and long pants any time dusk until dawn, so if you’ll be outsidearea of the sting will also help decrease you’ll be walking through woods or thick in early evening, cover up or sprayswelling. vegetation. yourself and your clothes with insectTo avoid bee stings, try choosing choose Spraying DEET or another bug repellent on repellent. your clothes will add another layer of pro-fragrance-free products, and never swat a tection. And always check your body andbee that lands on you. your clothes for ticks when you get home.
    • A LOOK BACK…. UPCOMING EVENTS….DRAMA CLINIC WAS A SUCCESS. HELD OVER JULY 10-EPEC SUPPORT GROUP—THE PERIOD OF 4 SATURDAYS. THE CLINIC POTLUCK PICNIC—MEET AT EFMP PLAY-WAS LEAD BY PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED GROUND ON PINE CAMP LANEACTOR, HOLLY ADAMS AND SPONSORED BY JULY 20– AUTISM/ADHD SUPPORT GROUPDR. MICHAEL FRIGA, OF 3-TEIR CONSULTINGAND EFMP. PARTICIPANTS ENJOYED DEVEL- AUGUST 6-10 4TH ANNUAL EFMP MOUN-OPING AND ACTING OUT SKITS LOOSELY TAIN CAMPBASED ON FAIRY TALES AND OTHER CHIL- AUGUST 17—AUTISM/ADHD SUPPORTDREN’S STORIES. GROUP SEPT 11—EPEC SUPPORT GROUP—USING VISUAL CHARTS IN THE HOME SEPT 21—AUTISM/ADHD SUPPORT GROUP—APPLE PICKING AT BEHLING S, MEXICO, NY OCT 9– EPEC SUPPORT GROUP—BIRDS AND THE BEES AND SPECIAL NEEDS OCT 19—AUSTISM/ADHD SUPPORT GROUP OCT 26—EFMP HALLOWEEN PARTY @ ACS DEC 8– HOLIDAY BOWLING BASH