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Arodelementsofart 101009211334-phpapp01

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  • 1. Art A visual statement that represents the world around you, communicates an idea, expresses a feeling or present an interesting design.
  • 2. Artist A person who uses imagination and skill to communicate ideas in visual form.
  • 3. What is applied art? Applied art refers to art that is made to be functional as well as visually pleasing.
  • 4. Visual Culture The visual statements you find in your environment every day. Paintings , books, chairs, videogames advertisements everything one sees, has seen or may imagine.  The internet, movies, toys, fashion and cars as well as fine arts are all part of one’s visual culture.
  • 5. Perceive To be come aware through the senses fo the special nature of objects. Using sight hearing touch smell and taste to perceive an object increases your understanding of it.  Artists must strengthen their perception to interpret what they see in the world around them.
  • 6. •The fundamentals or vocabulary of the artist’s language. •The basic visual components that an artist uses to create visual art. •Line, color, value, shape, form, space, and texture
  • 7. A mark with length and direction. A continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point. Ansel Adams Gustave Caillebotte
  • 8. LineLines can be described as having/being length and width  short/long, thick/thin, dark/light, blurred/uneven, sharp/clear. The style where lines are emphasized is called “linear”. Self Portrait of Pablo Picasso
  • 9. Kinds of lines Horizontal,  vertical,  diagonal, curved  zigzag.
  • 10. Pablo Picasso
  • 11. COLOR •Consists of •Hue (name for the color) •Intensity (brightness) •Value (lightness or darkness). Henri Matisse Venice Twilight by Claude Monet
  • 12. Color Theory • HueHue : name for the color • Intensity:Intensity: brightness or dullness of a hue. • Bright pure hues are called high-intensityhigh-intensity colors • Dull hues are called low-intensitylow-intensity colors. • ValueValue :: lightness or darkness of a hue. • When white is added to a hue the result is a tint.tint. • When black is added to a hue the result is a shade.shade.
  • 13. Color Primary colors are basic colors that can not be obtained by mixing. They are red, yellow, and blue. Secondary colors: are obtained by mixing primary colors. They are orange, green, and purple. Tertiary or Intermediate Colors: in between primary and secondary colors on the color wheel, have more of a primary color in them. They are: red-orange, yellow-green, blue-green etc.
  • 14. The Color Wheel The color wheel is a tool to help you organize colors, mix colors and compare colors. Colors across from each other on the wheel are complementary colors. Colors next to each other within the same family are analogous colors.
  • 15. The lightness or darkness of a color. MC Escher Pablo Picasso
  • 16. An area clearly set off by one or more of the other six visual elements of art. They have height and width but not depth. Shapes are flat, 2 dimensional. Joan Miro
  • 17. Shape Shape is an a element that artists use to convey their message or visual statement. Geometric shapes:Geometric shapes: precise mathematical shapes ex; circle, square, triangle. Free-form or organicFree-form or organic shapesshapes ex: outline/contour of a lake. Balancement by Wassily Kandinsky
  • 18. FORM A 3-dimensional object; or something in a 2-dimensional artwork that appears to be 3-dimensional Cylinder, cube, cone, pyramid, free-form form Jean Arp
  • 19. Gustave Caillebotte
  • 20. The distance or area between, around, above, below, or within things. Linear perspective- the lines of buildings roads and similar objects are slanted to make them appear to come together or meet in the distance. Size- objects in the foreground (front) are made bigger than objects in the background. Overlapping- nearer shapes and forms overlap or partly cover those meant to appear farther away. Placement- distant objects are placed higher up in the picture. Foreground, Middle ground and Background (creates DEPTH) La Rue de la Bavolle in Honfleur by Claude Monet. Space
  • 21. Space Positive space filled with something Negative empty spaces between the shapes or forms in two and three dimensional art. Intensity and value- the colors of objects meant to appear in the distance are lower in intensity than those of objects meant to appear nearer. They are also lighter in value. Detail- more detail is added to closer objects and less detail is added to those in the distance
  • 22. TEXTURETEXTURE •The surface quality or "feel" of an object, its smoothness, roughness, softness, etc. •Textures may be actual or implied.
  • 23. Cecil Buller Texture- the element of art that refers to how things feel, or look as though they might feel , if touched. Visual texture- is texture you experience with your eyes as you remember them from experience. Ex. Paintings of velvet, leather, silk or concrete.
  • 24. What we use to organize the Elements of Art, or the tools to make art.
  • 25. Principle of art concerned with arranging the elements so that no one part of the work overpowers, ore seems heaver than, any other part. Alexander Calder
  • 26. Balance Formal balance is dignified, stable, more static and symmetrical. Informal balance is asymmetrical. The Last Supper by Leonardo Da Vinci
  • 27. Symmetrical Balance The parts of an image are organized so that one side mirrors the other. Leonardo DaVinci
  • 28. AsymmetricalAsymmetrical BalanceBalance When one side of a composition does not reflect the design of the other. James Whistler
  • 29. Radial Balance When the elements of art or object in an artwork radiate or come out from a central point.
  • 30. The focal point of an image, or when one area or thing stand out the most. Jim Dine Gustav Klimt
  • 31. Emphasis Emphasis is a principle that captures your eye when you first see an art piece. The focal point or center of attention. The Herring Net by Winslow Homer
  • 32. CONTRAST A large difference between two things to create interest and tension. Ansel Adams Salvador Dali
  • 33. The principle of art that indicates movement through the repetition of elements and objects. Marcel Duchamp
  • 34. Movement The principle of art that leads the viewer to see action in a work, also the path that the viewers eye follows through the work. Movement is the principle of giving life to an artwork. The artist makes a compelling path through repeated line, color, and shapes. Napoleon Crossing the Alps by Jacques-Louis David
  • 35. Vincent VanGogh
  • 36. Gustav Klimt PATTERN -Two dimensional, decorative visual repetition. -Motif- unit of repetition in a visual pattern.
  • 37. Repetition Repetition is a principle that can be simple or complex. Repetition of line shape and color creates a visual rhythm. A pattern or motif also results from repetition. Repeated patterns also show order.
  • 38. Unity Unity is the arrangement of elements and principles of art to creat a feeling of completeness or wholeness. Irises by Vincent van Gogh
  • 39. Harmony A principle of design where elements of art are combined to accent their similarities and bind the picture parts into a whole. Sandy Skoglund
  • 40. Variety The use of differences and change to increase the visual interest of the work. Marc Chagall
  • 41. Variety Variety is a principle that uses differences and contrasts between elements to bring an art piece to life. Variety brings life and attention to an art piece. The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali
  • 42. •The comparative relationship of one part to another with respect to size, quantity, or degree; SCALE. Gustave Caillebotte
  • 43. Proportion Realistic proportion accurately represents people of things in their actual proportions. Distorted proportion effects mood and feelings by not being accurate in proportion. Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci

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