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Flash Mentoring: Transferring Knowledge and Experience in a Busy World - ASTD 2009 Conference

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Information on Flash Mentoring presented at the American Society for Training and Development ASTD 2009 International Conference and Exposition in Washington, DC

Information on Flash Mentoring presented at the American Society for Training and Development ASTD 2009 International Conference and Exposition in Washington, DC

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Flash Mentoring: Transferring Knowledge and Experience in a Busy World - ASTD 2009 Conference Flash Mentoring: Transferring Knowledge and Experience in a Busy World - ASTD 2009 Conference Presentation Transcript

  • FLASH MENTORING: Transferring Knowledge and Experience in a Busy World K. Scott Derrick Director of Professional Development Senior Executives Association June 1, 2009 ASTD 2009 International Conference and Exposition
  • Agenda
    • Learning Objectives
    • Benefits of Mentoring
    • Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Other Flash Mentoring Approaches
    • Flash Mentoring Exercise for Session Participants
    • Questions & Answers
    • Contact Information
  • Learning Objectives
    • Apply new ideas and approaches for designing and implementing innovative mentoring programs in your organization.
    • Assess new mentoring efforts to demonstrate results and build support for mentors and mentees.
  • Benefits of Mentoring
    • Mentoring links people with experienced individuals in learning situations that foster development and professional growth.
    • Increased evidence and awareness that mentoring plays a key role in career development for the mentee.
    • Mentoring provides benefits not only for the mentee but also for the mentor and their organization(s).
  • Benefits of Mentoring Private Public Four Broad Functions: 1) Teaching 2) Counseling 3) Intervention 4) Sponsorship
  • Benefits of Mentoring
    • Session Exercise #1
    • Reflect and develop an answer to this question:
    • What is the single best piece of advice that you have received from a mentor or manager that has served you well throughout your career so far?
    • Share your answer with a session partner.
  • Flash Mentoring Programs
    • A Major Challenge of Traditional Mentoring:
    • The lack of time (and the perceived lack of time) to devote to traditional mentoring programs can be a critical barrier to successful mentoring efforts.
    Flash mentoring addresses this challenge!
  • Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Key Components:
    • Mentoring is “a process that enables an individual to learn and seek guidance from a more experienced person who can pass on relevant knowledge and experience.”
    • One-time meeting only (i.e., flash mentoring session).
    • No predetermined, publicized matching criteria.
    • No formal training for mentor and/or mentee to participate in the program.
  • Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Flash Mentoring is NOT:
    • Situational mentoring
    • Informational interviewing
    • Always better than traditional mentoring
  • Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Analyze and assess your organization’s needs.
    • Design the program around those needs.
    • Identify the prospective mentors and mentees.
    • Match participants to create mentoring pairs.
    • Oversee the flash mentoring sessions.
    • Evaluate results of the mentoring sessions.
    Key Steps in Developing a Program:
  • Flash Mentoring Programs Key Data for Two Case-Study Programs 32 (16 pairs) 60 (30 pairs) How many people participated? Aspiring senior executives in federal agencies Early- and mid-career federal employees in various agencies Who were the mentees? Senior Executive members of SEA Academy Fellows from NAPA Who were the mentors? Fall 2008 Fall 2007 When did the program run? Senior Executives Association (SEA) <www.seniorexecs.org> National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) & 13L <www.napawash.org> <www.13L.org>
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Overall Summary:
    • Follow-up:
      • Emails were sent to both mentees and mentors after flash mentoring sessions were held.
    • Information requested:
      • whether the experience was positive.
      • whether their mentor/mentee was prepared.
      • whether they would likely meet again with their mentor/mentee.
      • whether they might be interested in participating in the program again.
      • whether they had any other thoughts about the flash mentoring session.
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
      • Overall Results:
      • Responses were overwhelmingly positive.
      • Large percentage of the mentors
        • offered to communicate with same mentee again.
        • would participate in a flash mentoring session again with another mentee.
      • Vast majority of the mentees
        • would participate in a flash mentoring session again with another mentor.
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Main Focus of Sessions in Case Studies:
    • Teaching
      • Career development
    • Intervention
      • Opening lines of communication
      • Visibility and marketing
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Examples of Teaching:
    • MENTEE: “After discussing ideas that he had after reviewing my resume, we conversed and brainstormed a few more ideas for me to focus on to help me reach a few of my short term goals.”
    • MENTEE: “I asked him to review my IDP and provide feedback, he agreed.”
    • MENTOR: “I spent some time with [mentee] at the beginning offering suggestions on ways to improve his resume.”
    • MENTOR: “I thought that I was able to provide some strategic advice to [mentee]. She was looking at her career in terms of the next promotion and had not thought through where she wanted to be in five to ten years.”
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Examples of Intervention:
    • MENTOR: “I gave [mentee] some ideas to investigate, and I promised to locate some individuals in the procurement world who would be able to proffer some additional insights about that field and perhaps consider her for employment.”
    • MENTOR: “I am working with [agency] to attempt to break a logjam that has developed there concerning a 60-day rotation [mentee] would like to do.”
    • MENTEE: “[Mentor] is providing me with a list of names of individuals that I can arrange to have meetings with.”
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Some Overall Feedback from Mentees:
    • “ [T]he flash mentoring program exceeded my expectations…There is also an unquantifiable nature to matching strangers, yet at the same time, people who can relate to each other through a particular career path.”
    • “ I think this is a great program and more individuals should serve as mentors and more individuals who are in dead-end career paths should know about it. Thank you.”
    • “ I wished it had been offered a lot sooner. This has been the most effective coaching that I have ever received.”
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Some Overall Feedback from Mentors:
    • “ It was very positive for me, because I felt I had something to share with the mentee and I was able to share her excitement and interest in her personal growth.”
    • “ [The program] was user-friendly and not an unrealistic commitment to make even with my unwieldy calendar.”
    • “ It’s tough to connect in such a short period of time, but I believe it was a net positive.”
    • “ I enjoyed the discussion and would be glad to do this again.”
  • Evaluation of Flash Mentoring Programs
    • Lessons Learned:
    • Fully explain the program to all participants…and reexplain.
    • Provide mentoring “tip sheets” to both mentees and mentors that are focused specifically on your flash mentoring program.
    • Ensure that mentees provide their proposed discussion topic(s) and resume to the mentor prior to the flash mentoring session.
    • Address issues regarding “unstated willingness” of the mentor to communicate or meet again with the mentee.
    • Follow up with mentors by providing selected mentee observations to ensure that mentors feel appreciated and strengthen the mentor network for the future.
  • Other Flash Mentoring Approaches
    • Sequential Flash Mentoring
    • Women in Technology - Mentor-Protégé Program Protégés are matched with 4 different women during each 5-month program. Each session is 1 hour of one-on-one mentoring.
    • York University Speed Mentoring Students were given the opportunity to meet with various York alumni in concurrent 10-minute mentoring sessions.
  • Other Flash Mentoring Approaches
    • Group Flash Mentoring
    • Executive Women in Government – Flash Mentoring EWG style
    • A dozen mentors were each grouped with 3 or more participants. A designated question was asked of the mentors and then ad hoc questions were asked by the participants. There were 3 separate groups/rotations, each lasting about 25 minutes.
  • Flash Mentoring Experience
    • Session Exercise #2
    • Pair with a session participant in a 20-minute flash mentoring session.
    • Brief out to the session participants:
      • Mentor & mentee: What are your general reactions to today’s flash mentoring session?
      • Mentee: What is the single best piece of advice that you received today from your flash mentor?
  • Questions and Answers ?
  • Contact Information
    • K. Scott Derrick Director of Professional Development Senior Executives Association 820 First Street NE, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20002 202.927.7000 www.seniorexecs.org
    < www.flashmentoring.com >