YUCK! Housekeeping regulations For dealers that you just have to know

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YUCK! Housekeeping regulations
For dealers that you just have to know

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  • Let’s take a virtual walk through the dealership and see if we can’t identify some of the more common housekeeping issues that crop up and then address why they matter and what you should do about them.Option 1: most likely optionAsk participants which area of the dealership they want to start in and click that area of the “map” to go there in the PPT.Option 2: use only if you feel your attendees will participate in a constructive mannerIf you have a large group (10+ or so) and they seem willing to participate and stay on topic, divide them into smaller groups and assign each group one or two areas of the dealership. Ask them to generate as many housekeeping-related issues in those departments as they can in two minutes. (You don’t need to give them a lot of time or the conversation will definitely move on to other subjects.)After two minutes, ask each group to share what they came up with by department. Discuss why the issues pose a problem and what should be done to fix them. Try to solicit as much of this information as possible rather than spoon feeding it. If no one volunteers, though, share the information yourself. Click the area of the “map” onscreen to go the corresponding department and use the notes there to guide you.
  • What kind of housekeeping issues can be problematic in the service department? Why do they matter and what should you do about them?Solicit issues and talk them through. If you know that certain issues have been logged in MKO in the past, for example, mention that you know the department has had issues before. If you’ve just written something up, say so. Ask participants if they know what the issues were (or are).Discuss why each issue matters and what should be done about it. After your discussion, go through the images onscreen to recap. If some of them weren’t mentioned, either go over them or skip them, depending on time. If no one contributes ideas, share the information yourself. Show each of the images on this slide and ask participants to identify what the issue is in each one. Use the notes below to guide you. (Additionally, you can reference the HousekeepingIssues.xlsx spreadsheet.) Ask the group if they know anyone who has gotten hurt because of one of these issues. If not, consider sharing a relevant story based on your experience. NOTE: Not all of these issues should be covered. Also, there may be other issues that get raised for which there aren’t photos in the PPT and that’s fine. It’s more important that the issues discussed be relevant to dealership you’re at, especially if they have a history of poor housekeeping.Image 1: Improperly stored tires – trip and injury hazard (solution: take them out to where used tires are disposed of)Image 2: Oily floors and improperly discarded rags – slip and fire hazard (solution: put rags in the appropriate bin and close the lid; clean up the spill immediately)Image 3: Open parts washer – health hazard (solution: keep the lid closed) How do you collect and dispose of Brake Cleaner and other Flammables?Image 4: Improperly guarded grinder – injury hazard (solution: make sure all protections are in place; fix or notify supervisor immediately)Image 5: Blocked eyewash station – emergency response hazard (solution: clear anything blocking access and make sure the station is working)Image 6: Brake dust – slip and breathing hazard (solution: sweep the floor and dispose of the dust immediately, wear PPE)Image 7: Old parts/piled junk – trip and injury hazard (solution: dispose of scrap metal regularly; if you’re not sure where it should go, talk to your supervisor)Image 8: Large spill unattended– slip hazard and unsightly to customers (solution: take care of all spills ASAP from start to finish)Image 9:Cords/hoses/boxes blocking the work area and walkway – trip hazard (solution: put away as soon as you’re done using them)
  • What kind of housekeeping issues can be problematic in the detail department?Solicit issues and talk them through. If you know that certain issues have been logged in MKO in the past, for example, mention that you know the department has had issues before. If you’ve just written something up, say so. Ask participants if they know what the issues were (or are).Discuss why each issue matters and what should be done about it. After your discussion, go through the images onscreen to recap. If some of them weren’t mentioned, either go over them or skip them, depending on time. If no one contributes ideas, share the information yourself. Show each of the images on this slide and ask participants to identify what the issue is in each one. Use the notes below to guide you. (Additionally, you can reference the HousekeepingIssues.xlsx spreadsheet.) Ask the group if they know anyone who has gotten hurt because of one of these issues. If not, consider sharing a relevant story based on your experience. NOTE: Not all of these issues have to be covered. Also, there may be other issues that get raised for which there aren’t photos in the PPT and that’s fine. It’s more important that the issues discussed be relevant to dealership you’re at, especially if they have a history of poor housekeeping.Image 1: Unlabeled spray bottles, disorganized– health hazard and unproductive (solution: label all chemical containers and check them weekly)Image 2: Loose razor blades– injury hazard (solution: use a blade holder and dispose of all used blades in a designated sealed container)Image 3: Damaged plug end– electrical hazard (solution: replace plug ends when grounding pin is missing and/or insulation damage)Image 4: Cords/hoses blocking work area– trip hazard (solution: wrap up all cords and hoses when done using them)Image 5: Employee crushing cardboard in dumpster– injury hazard (solution: stack extra cardboard in another area, contact disposal company)Image 6: Missing outlet cover– electrical hazard (solution: install a new outlet cover)
  • What kind of housekeeping issues can be problematic in the parts department? Solicit issues and talk them through. If you know that certain issues have been logged in MKO in the past, for example, mention that you know the department has had issues before. If you’ve just written something up, say so. Ask participants if they know what the issues were (or are).Discuss why each issue matters and what should be done about it. After your discussion, go through the images onscreen to recap. If some of them weren’t mentioned, either go over them or skip them, depending on time. If no one contributes ideas, share the information yourself. Show each of the images on this slide and ask participants to identify what the issue is in each one. Use the notes below to guide you. (Additionally, you can reference the HousekeepingIssues.xlsx spreadsheet.) Ask the group if they know anyone who has gotten hurt because of one of these issues. If not, consider sharing a relevant story based on your experience. NOTE: Not all of these issues have to be covered. Also, there may be other issues that get raised for which there aren’t photos in the PPT and that’s fine. It’s more important that the issues discussed be relevant to dealership you’re at, especially if they have a history of poor housekeeping.Image 1: Improperly stored light bulbs– health hazard (solution: store all used bulbs in a box and label it as Used Bulbs, Universal Waste, etc.)Image 2: Improperly stored used batteries– health and environmental hazard (solution: store in a containment device)Image 3: Electrical cord, plastic in walkway– trip hazard (solution: remove all trip hazards from walkways)Image 4: Boxes stored along upper edge– injury hazard (solution: storage areas require toe board or remove boxes)Image 5: Blocked electrical panels– electrical and fire hazard (solution: remove all items from electrical panels)Image 6:Boxes piled up and questionable ladder– trip and fall hazard (solution: dispose of cardboard and replace ladder with Type I or II)Image 7:Blocked fire extinguisher– emergency response hazard (solution: remove item and keep all emergency response equipment clear at all times)
  • What kind of housekeeping issues can be problematic in the body shop? Solicit issues and talk them through. If you know that certain issues have been logged in MKO in the past, for example, mention that you know the department has had issues before. If you’ve just written something up, say so. Ask participants if they know what the issues were (or are).Discuss why each issue matters and what should be done about it. After your discussion, go through the images onscreen to recap. If some of them weren’t mentioned, either go over them or skip them, depending on time. If no one contributes ideas, share the information yourself. Show each of the images on this slide and ask participants to identify what the issue is in each one. Use the notes below to guide you. (Additionally, you can reference the HousekeepingIssues.xlsx spreadsheet.) Ask the group if they know anyone who has gotten hurt because of one of these issues. If not, consider sharing a relevant story based on your experience. NOTE: Not all of these issues have to be covered. Also, there may be other issues that get raised for which there aren’t photos in the PPT and that’s fine. It’s more important that the issues discussed be relevant to dealership you’re at, especially if they have a history of poor housekeeping.Image 1: Unsecured cylinders– health and property hazard (solution: all cylinders must be secured in a designated location)Image 2: Open paint room door– health hazard (solution: paint room door must remain closed)Image 3: Waste paint splashed, unlabeled waste containers– health hazard (solution: use a paint funnel and label all HW containers)Image 4: Open paint gun washer– health hazard (solution: close the washer with the cover after each use)Image 5: Blocked EXIT– emergency response hazard (solution: remove all items from an EXIT path)Image 6:Open waste paint funnel– health hazard (solution: close funnel after each use)Image 7:Open flammable storage cabinet– firehazard (solution: store all flammables in cabinet and close doors after each use)Image 8:Paint cups with liquid paint in trash– healthhazard (solution: properly dispose of all paint properly per federal/state codes)
  • What kind of housekeeping issues can be problematic in the showroom and on the grounds in front of and around the showroom where customers walk?Solicit issues and talk them through. If you know that certain issues have been logged in MKO in the past, for example, mention that you know the department has had issues before. If you’ve just written something up, say so. Ask participants if they know what the issues were (or are).Discuss why each issue matters and what should be done about it. After your discussion, go through the images onscreen to recap. If some of them weren’t mentioned, either go over them or skip them, depending on time. If no one contributes ideas, share the information yourself. Show each of the images on this slide and ask participants to identify what the issue is in each one. Use the notes below to guide you. (Additionally, you can reference the HousekeepingIssues.xlsx spreadsheet.) Ask the group if they know anyone who has gotten hurt because of one of these issues. If not, consider sharing a relevant story based on your experience. NOTE: Not all of these issues have to be covered. Also, there may be other issues that get raised for which there aren’t photos in the PPT and that’s fine. It’s more important that the issues discussed be relevant to dealership you’re at, especially if they have a history of poor housekeeping.Image 1: Uncapped outlets in Child area– electrical hazard (solution: install new outlet caps for outlets in child areas)Image 2: Electrical cord through doorway– electrical hazard (solution: remove cord, no cords can run through doorways, walls, etc.)Image 3: Broken hand railing– fall and injury hazard (solution: repair railing ASAP)Image 4: Open and unlabeled drums– environmental hazard (solution: identify contents of each drum, label them, keep them closed, and dispose of them ASAP)Image 5: Open oil drip drum– environmentalhazard (solution: remove all oily trash and install a cover for this drum and label it)Image 6:Used batteries stored outside– environmental hazard (solution: cover batteries with a tarp or store them in a shed or other covered container)Image 7:Icy parking lot– slip and injuryhazard (solution: winter plan includes salting parking lots)
  • YUCK! Housekeeping regulations For dealers that you just have to know

    1. 1. Presented by Amanda Rawls South Central District Team Leader
    2. 2. Moderator Becky Ross Marketing Manager (303) 228-8753 bross@kpaonline.com
    3. 3. Presenter Amanda Rawls, SC Team Leader • BS Environmental Science • Master of Environmental Management • 7 years of E&S Experience • 4 years with KPA • Lives in Austin, Texas
    4. 4. Housekeeping Housekeeping The management, care, and servicing of a facility’s property and equipment. Webinar Purpose • Identify common housekeeping issues and determine what you can do about them to keep safety, productivity, morale, and customer relations high • How OSHA can enforce housekeeping regulations • Improving your first impression to a compliance officer
    5. 5. Housekeeping Examples
    6. 6. Why Does Housekeeping Matter? • A clean environment reduces injuries • Clutter slows work down • Would you be happy working in a messy environment? • Customers can see their cars are fixed in a clean and organized area
    7. 7. OSHA Housekeeping Regulations OSHA does not have a subpart devoted to housekeeping
    8. 8. Walking and Working Surfaces 1910.22(a)(1-3) – Housekeeping General • Keep all work areas clean, orderly, and in a sanitary condition • The floors of every work room must be kept clean and when possible in a dry condition. • To facilitate cleaning every work surface should be kept clear of protruding nails, splinters, holes, or loose boards 1910.22(b) – Aisles and Passageways • Sufficient clearance allowed for aisles • Aisles must be kept clear and in good repair with no obstruction OSHA Subpart D
    9. 9. Hazardous Materials 1910.106(3)(9) • Maintenance and operating practices will tend to control leakage and prevent the accidental escape of flammable or combustible liquids. • Spills will be cleaned up promptly. OSHA Subpart H Do you think no one noticed these spills?
    10. 10. Sanitation Would you want to work here? OSHA Subpart J
    11. 11. Sanitation 1910.141(a)(3) – Housekeeping 1910.141(a)(4) – Waste Disposal 1910.141(a)(5) – Vermin Control 1910.141(b) – Water Supply (potable and non-potable water) 1910.141(c) – Toilet Facilities 1910.141(d) – Washing Facilities 1910.141(e) – Change Rooms 1910.141(f) – Clothes Drying Facilities 1910.141(g) – Consumption of food and beverages 1910.141(h) – Food Handling OSHA Subpart J
    12. 12. 1910.141(a)(3) – Housekeeping • All places of employment shall be kept clean • The floor of every workroom shall be in a dry condition • Drainage shall be maintained and mats or other dry standing places shall be provided • To facilitate cleaning every working space shall be free of protruding nails, splinters, loose boards, and unnecessary holes or openings. OSHA Subpart J
    13. 13. OSHA Interpretation Letter OSHA Subpart J
    14. 14. 1910.141(a)(4) Waste Disposal • Waste receptacles cannot leak • Should have a tight fitting cover unless it can be maintained in a sanitary condition without a cover • Trash should be removed as often as possible to maintain a sanitary condition 1910.141(a)(5) Vermin Control • Every enclosed workplace shall be constructed and maintained to prevent the entrance or harboarage of rodents, insects, or other vermin OSHA Subpart J
    15. 15. 1910.141(b) – Water Supply Potable Water • Drinking water must be provided • Water fountains must be clean and sanitary • Potable water for bathrooms must be provided for hand washing Nonpotable Water • Nonpotable water must be labeled OSHA Subpart J
    16. 16. 1910.141(g) Consumption of food and beverages • No employee is allowed to consume or store food or beverages in a toilet room nor in any area exposed to a toxic material • Receptacles storing food must be emptied daily when used OSHA Subpart J
    17. 17. Materials Handling and Storage • Storage areas shall be kept free from accumulation of materials that constitute hazards from tripping, fire, explosion, or pest harborage • Vegetation control will be exercised when necessary OSHA Subpart N
    18. 18. KPA Inspections Service Body Shop PartsDetail Showroom
    19. 19. Housekeeping – Service Department
    20. 20. Housekeeping – Detail Department
    21. 21. Housekeeping – Parts Department
    22. 22. Housekeeping - Body Shop
    23. 23. Housekeeping - Showroom & Grounds
    24. 24. Fixing Housekeeping Issues 1. Identify the problem areas 2. Implement a housekeeping schedule 3. Assign housekeeping responsibilities to employees 4. Provide equipment like hose reels, shelves, floor squeegees, etc. 5. Immediately clean up spills 6. Properly stow equipment 7. Notify managers of damaged equipment 8. Avoid leaving trip hazards on the floor 9. Train employees on housekeeping
    25. 25. Housekeeping Solutions to Avoid 1. Using a compressed air hose to blow away dirt and dust • Mops and brooms should be used instead • Not removing dirt just pushing it somewhere else • Can create respiratory problems • Can create health hazards 2. Throw everything away • Waste determinations must be made
    26. 26. Solutions Before OSHA Listen to employee complaints • Employees can use the suggestions tab in MKO • Most housekeeping issues have been complained about but not acted on OSHA cites housekeeping regulations often • OSHA will use this as a catch all
    27. 27. OSHA Fines Unlabeled Bottles 1910.1200(f)(5)(i) The employer shall ensure that each container of hazardous chemicals in the workplace is labeled, tagged or marked with the Identity of the hazardous chemical(s) contained therein. Initial Penalty: $735 per unlabeled container
    28. 28. OSHA Fines Grinders 1910.215(a)(4) Work rests. On offhand grinding machines, work rests shall be used to support the work. They shall be of rigid construction and designed to be adjustable to compensate for wheel wear. Work rests shall be kept adjusted closely to the wheel with a maximum opening of one-eighth inch to prevent the work from being jammed between the wheel and the rest, which may cause wheel breakage. The work rest shall be securely clamped after each adjustment. The adjustment shall not be made with the wheel in motion. Initial Penalty: $825 per missing Work (Tool) Rest
    29. 29. OSHA Fines Electrical 1910.303(b)(1) Examination. Electric equipment shall be free from recognized hazards that are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. Initial Penalty: $1500
    30. 30. OSHA Fines Eyewash Stations 1910.151(c) Where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use. Initial Penalty: $1800
    31. 31. OSHA Fines Housekeeping 1910.22(a)(1) All places of employment, passageways, storerooms, and service rooms shall be kept clean and orderly and in a sanitary condition. Initial Penalty: $2700
    32. 32. The Good News Housekeeping can always be improved! Who is responsible for housekeeping? YOU

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