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Baby Got Backend: Content Administrators are Users Too
 

Baby Got Backend: Content Administrators are Users Too

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Presented with Jeff Eaton (@eaton) at Drupalcon 2011 in Chicago.

Presented with Jeff Eaton (@eaton) at Drupalcon 2011 in Chicago.

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  • Sometimes kitchens, even though they’re functional, still need to be remodeled.\n
  • Getting a better kitchen, getting better pots and pans, means you have better tools to work with. It’s easier to navigate the space. A bright, attractive kitchen is more pleasurable to work in.\n\nBut getting a better kitchen doesn't make you a better cook. It doesn’t help you decide what’s for dinner.\n
  • Drupal needed remodeling.\n
  • D7UX has raised awareness and made improvements, but mostly for site builders. We have better tools in our UX toolbox. Those are good things, BUT that doesn’t mean the problem is solved.\n
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  • Content admins think about Drupal the way most people think about their cars. They don’t need to know how it works under the hood in order to use it. It’s not a feat of engineering to be marveled at or puzzled over. It’s something they use to accomplish the things they need to do.\n
  • Any content driven site has an internal team that creates and publishes content. These content administrators spend all day using the Drupal interface, even though they’re not developers and they may have no idea how things work under the hood.\n
  • Community driven site has both external and internal content creators. \nPower law. your 1% that's herding the sheep, and your 10% that's actually creating original content.\nAdmins are doing community moderation in addition to managing content.\n2/3 of the work is done by people who drive by.\n
  • CMS Showdown at SXSW -- drupal was EASIER. wtf? revealed the importance and danger of workflow customization. does that mean drupal "is easier?" no. it means that "managing your blog" is a crappy way to approach forum moderation and event management.\n
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  • What IS crappy about drupal that better tools don't automatically fix? Workflow, information overload (too much data, too hard to find), too many fields, too many clicks, too many screens...\n\n(current image is from http://ashotofjd.com/post/90368907/worst-user-interface-ever-via)\n
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  • If a content-driven organization isn't listening to its content creators -- and giving them a voice in redesign and platforming decisions - they might as well be throwing money down the drain. \n\n
  • If you have analytics, pay attention to them just as ecommerce sites would pay attention to shopping cart analytics. How often to people start creating content and stop, why? For teams, do you know how long it takes them to create content? Where are the problems? What are their pain points? Chances are it's not "Oh, Drupal is ugly." \n\n\n
  • Roleplay, act out the workflow, see where they hang up, see where they grimace. Don't JUST simulate the online stuff, simulate the offline components of their work, too. Where are the roadblocks?\n\n\n\n
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  • If your system is older than six months, your content creators have probably found uses for it you don't know about.\nMyspace's CSS jammed into profile fields, "Oh, we've been using the Alt text for something else entirely," etc.\n\n
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  • If it's a new site this even more important -- there's often not enough existing data for people to look for best practices, and they just muck with it until it does what they want it to.)\n
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  • Keep asking about the "whys" of tasks they do to understand, and avoid rebuilding old frustrations. (Building oysters around pearls is never useful). \n\nThis forces you to think like the business, too, not JUST a coder or designer. \n\n
  • There's a big difference between essential workflow and learned workarounds to old systems. \n\nDelicate balance between presenting them with a better approach than they're used to... and berating them into accepting a solution.\n\n
  • Iterate, iterate, iterate. Fast-and-crappy turns to polished-and-good with time and feedback from the users. \nBuilding content tools without feedback is like optimizing code without without metrics or profiling data. Flying blind.\n\n
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  • Don't optimize the individual pieces without addressing the workflow. \n\nTrain, simulate, roleplay. Do the intuitive pieces turn baffling when content editors have to pull the pieces together? It's easy to be penny-wise pound-foolish. \n\n\n
  • Drupal's emphasis on metadata and connections between pieces of content makes it easy to miss how mind-boggling the TASK is, because each one of the 15 screens is "easy" \n\n
  • Wrapper forms that build and save nodes behind the scenes. \nSingle-step forms to create an episode and a cluster of articles, galleries, etc.\nOverview screens that let \n
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  • Just naming the labels carefully and arranging things in the right tabs is huge. This is a classic UX/IA task. \n\nJust because it’s not a difficult technical problem to solve doesn’t mean it’s not important.\n
  • 'Manage this' works on every page on the site, it just presents context-relevant 'Manage' options.) \nManaging things is the same TASK even if it's different DATA. Admins only care about their tasks.\n
  • Muscle memory and visual patterns are important. NO ONE READS HELP TEXT.\nGrouping implies purpose: having the same groups even when fields differ from site to site\n
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Baby Got Backend: Content Administrators are Users Too Baby Got Backend: Content Administrators are Users Too Presentation Transcript

  • Baby Got Backend:Content administrators are users tooKaren McGraneJeff Eaton
  • Hi, I’m Jeff Eaton from Lullabot @eaton 2
  • Hi, I’m Karen McGranefrom Bond Art + Science @karenmcgrane 3
  • WE FOCUS ON MAKING DRUPALEASIER FOR SITE BUILDERS. 8
  • BUT WHAT ABOUT THE PEOPLEWHO USE DRUPAL EVERY DAY? 9
  • CONTENT ADMINISTRATORS AREMORE IMPORTANT TO THELONGTERM SUCCESS OF THE SITE. 10
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sherlock77/25369435/
  • BETTER INTERFACE WIDGETSDON’T EQUAL USABILITY 15
  • 16
  • BETTER WORKFLOWEQUALS USABILITY 17
  • DRUPAL PRESENTS A DATAMODEL, NOT A TASK MODEL 19
  • BUT YOU HAVE THE TOOLS TOCHANGE THE ADMIN WORKFLOWON YOUR SITE 20
  • HOW TO DO IT
  • HOW TO DO IT1. Listen to the content administrators. 22
  • 1. Listen to the content administrators.IF YOUR CONTENT CREATORSDON’T HAVE A VOICE, YOU’RETHROWING MONEY AWAY. 23
  • 1. Listen to the content administrators.ANALYZE TASK COMPLETIONLIKE IT’S AN ECOMMERCESHOPPING CART. 24
  • 1. Listen to the content administrators.GET THEM TO ROLEPLAY ANDDOCUMENT BOTH ONLINE ANDOFFLINE WORKFLOWS. 25
  • HOW TO DO IT1. Listen to the content administrators.2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it. 26
  • 2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.CONTENT CREATORS INVENT ALLKINDS OF WORKAROUNDS. 27
  • 2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.UNDERSTANDING HOW FIELDSARE USED WILL SAVE COUNTLESSHOURS CLEANING UP MESSES. 28
  • 2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.EVEN NEW SITES EVOLVEQUICKLY. 29
  • HOW TO DO IT1. Listen to the content administrators.2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterate. 30
  • 3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterateTHINK LIKE THE BUSINESS.WHY DO THEY NEED TO DO ACERTAIN TASK? 31
  • 3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterateDON’T JUST REPLICATE EXISTINGMENTAL MODELS. 32
  • 3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterateFAST-AND-CRAPPY TURNS TOPOLISHED-AND-GOOD WITH THERIGHT FEEDBACK. 33
  • HOW TO DO IT1. Listen to the content administrators.2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterate.4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens. 34
  • 4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens.REAL CONTENT PRODUCTIONIS A PROCESS, NOT A SINGLESCREEN. 35
  • 4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens.METADATA MAKES FLEXIBLE SITESBUT COMPLEX WORKFLOWS. 36
  • 4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens.IT’S OKAY TO CREATE DIFFERENTWORKFLOWS FOR DIFFERENTBEHAVIORS. 37
  • 4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens.BULK TOOLS.EASY TURNS HARD WHEN YOUHAVE TO REPEAT IT 10,000TIMES. 38
  • HOW TO DO IT1. Listen to the content administrators.2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterate.4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens.5. Use repeating concepts, not just UI elements. 39
  • 5. Use repeating concepts, not just UI elements.PROPER CATEGORIZATION ANDCONSISTENT LABELING GO ALONG WAY. 40
  • 5. Use repeating concepts, not just UI elements.USE SIMILAR VISUAL CUES FORWORKFLOWS ACROSS THE SITE. 41
  • 5. Use repeating concepts, not just UI elements.PLACE SIMILAR FIELDS IN ACONSISTENT PLACE ACROSSALL SCREENS. 42
  • NIRVANA! …ALMOST. 43
  • THE BETTER IT FITS ONE TEAM,THE HARDER IT IS TO REUSE. 44
  • “There’s a big difference between the ‘site’ and‘shop’ mentalities.Devs who work on a site for a long time alwaysmake some code that no one else can use.Shops and the community usually want stuff thatcan be reused over and over. —Blake Hall 45
  • ACCEPT THAT MANY GOODANSWERS WILL BE UNIQUE. 46
  • HOW TO DO IT1. Listen to the content administrators.2. Don’t just understand the data, understand what they’re doing with it.3. Keep asking “why?” and iterate, iterate, iterate.4. Optimize the workflow, not individual screens.5. Use repeating concepts, not just UI elements.6. Accept that many good answers will be unique. 47
  • Thanks!@eaton & @karenmcgrane 48
  • What did you think?Locate this session on the DCC website:http://chicago2011.drupal.org/sessionsClick the “Take the Survey” link.Thanks!