IR 2.0 International Benchmark Study / University of Leipzig

  • 9,422 views
Uploaded on

The cross-national IR 2.0 study conducted by the University of Leipzig / Department Communication Management in summer 2011 focused on company-owned investor relations websites as well as Twitter, …

The cross-national IR 2.0 study conducted by the University of Leipzig / Department Communication Management in summer 2011 focused on company-owned investor relations websites as well as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and SlideShare usage for IR purposes by the 150 largest companies listed in DAX, CAC, FTSE, DJIA and Nikkei. The content analysis revealed usage patterns and identified tools, topics, and intensity of use, dialogical approaches and functions. An engagement index offered the possibility for ranking lists within the indices as well as among the different countries. Additionally, the influence of industrial sectors or sales markets was tested.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
9,422
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7

Actions

Shares
Downloads
185
Comments
2
Likes
10

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Investor relations 2.0 – An international benchmark study Kristin Koehler, M.A.  University of Leipzig | Institute of Communication and Media Studies | August 20111 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 2. Content Outline of the study Research design Empirical insights Best practices Summary of findings2 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 3. Outline of the study _ Online content analysis of top 30 listed businesses in the United States  (Dow Jones Industrial Average), Germany (DAX), UK (FTSE), France (CAC)  and Japan (Nikkei) _ In addition, comparison of the IR 2.0 engagement of German companies  listed in DAX, MDAX, TecDAX and SDAX _ Longitudinal design for German and U.S. indices: first IR 2.0 study  conducted in 2009 (see DIRK research edition, vol. 17, Köhler, K. (2010):  Investor relations and social media) _ Organized by the University of Leipzig, Kristin Koehler, M.A. _ Thanks to Melanie Gerasch and Isabel Reinhardt for their support3 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 4. Outline of the study Aims and focus _ Monitoring the status quo in the field of investor relations 2.0 in an  international context _ Identifying trends and developments for German and U.S. businesses _ Identifying best practices _ Comparing use of social media for IR purposes in different countries and  cultural settings4 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 5. Research design _ Online content analysis of 280 listed companies in GER, USA, GB, FRA,  JPN: Investor relations websites and presence with IR topics on Facebook,  Twitter, YouTube and SlideShare _ Analysis included platforms and tools, predominant functions, topics, ratio  between obligatory information and published news via social media,  possibility for feedback and dialogue with stakeholders _ Ranking in regard to investor relations 2.0 engagement index _ Period of analysis: December 2010 – May 2011 _ Independent variables: industrial sector, sales market, index membership _ Methods of empirical research, descriptive and analytical analysis (using  SPSS for statistical analysis)  See Koehler (2011) for further readings.5 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 6. Overview obligatory and optional online investor relations Source: Own display in  reference to Köhler, 2010; 6 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de Weber, 2009
  • 7. Empirical insights7 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 8. Investor relations 2.0 engagement index Engagement index IR 2.0 engagement index (IIR2.0) comprises internal and external IR 2.0 engagement. Internal = Social media on the IR website; External =  external social networks or platforms, here: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, or SlideShare. Index values for the overall score ranged from 0 to  1,280 with low engagement on a level of 0 !" IIR2.0 !#$$%"&()*&"+,-,&+."/+"-"010"/2"#$$"!"IIR2.0 !3$$"-+("4),4"+,-,&+."/+"-"010" of IIR2.053$$68 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 9. U.S. and German companies outperform RANKING IR­2.0­ENGAGEMENT Companies Ranking IR 2.0 / internal (in  Ranking IR 2.0 / external (in  Ranking IR 2.0 / overall (in  comparison to 2009) comparison to 2009) comparison to 2009) 1 Cisco Systems Inc. (4) DJIA Alcoa Inc. (1) DJIA Cisco Systems Inc. (5) DJIA 2 General Electric Co. (1) DJIA BASF SE (30) DAX General Electric Co. (1) DJIA 3 SAP AG (2) DAX Deutsche Bank AG (10) DAX SAP AG (2) DAX 4 Hewlett­Packard Co. (3) DJIA BMW AG (13) DAX Hewlett­Packard Co. (7) DJIA 5 AT&T Inc. (66) DJIA Chevron Corp. (15) DJIA AT&T Inc. (22) DJIA 6 Intel Corp. (6) DJIA SAP AG (4) DAX Intel Corp. (10) DJIA 7 Alcoa Inc. (25) DJIA Alcatel­Lucent SA (­) CAC Alcoa Inc. (3) DJIA 8 BAYER AG (12) DAX Cisco Systems Inc. (6) DJIA BAYER AG (23) DAX 9 Daimler AG (10) DAX Lafarge SA (­) CAC Daimler AG (12) DAX 10 Boeing Co. (43) DJIA Daimler AG (9) DAX BASF SE (27) DAX N = 150. Comparison could only be conducted for German DAX listed and U.S. DJIA listed companies. Changes in: DAX: sorted out: Salzgitter AG, new: HeidelbergCement  AG; DJIA: no changes. For the 2009 research results cf. Köhler, 2010 (N = 190; indices analysed: DAX, DJIA, MDAX, SDAX, TecDAX).Score IR 2.0 / internal = ((no. of dialogical  tools *3) + (no. of tools * 2) + (no. of social media publications on IR website * functions (1‐4) * degree of implementation (0‐3)) + (no. of social media publications with  feedback or comment function on IR website * 3) + (no. of social media publications on IR website / no. of IR releases traditionally published)). Score IR 2.0 / external =  ((no. IR channels * 3) + (no. of channels with IR topics * 2) + (no. of social media publications on external platforms) + (no. of social media publications on external  platforms / no. of IR releases traditionally published)). Score IR 2.0 / overall = ((Score IR 2.0 / internal) + (Score IR 2.0 / external)).9 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 10. U.S. blue chips even more engaged than German DAX;  social networks remain underrepresented Mean values scores10 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 11. 95 per cent use social media on their IR website;  webcast and RSS feed on top position  Overview applications on IR website RSS feed 30 Other 25 Podcast 20 15 IR app 10 Webcast 5 0 Share button Video cast Wiki Weblog Chat DJIA  DAX  FTSE CAC NIKKEI N = 142. Number of companies using the mentionend applications on IR website. Other: e.g. social media survey, live stream without filing,  instant messaging reminder, skype, virtual shareholder magazines. Share button includes Facebook “like” button and tweet button.11 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 12. Companies increasingly link to external platforms from  their IR website No. of companies with links to external platforms 0 1 Link to other 2 2 3 0 0 3 Link to SlideShare 1 0 Link to FlickR 1 2 2 3 3 4 0 Link to YouTube 0 4 Link to SlideShare 0 10 3 2 7 7 0 Link to Twitter 4 6 Link to YouTube 4 17 4 10 2 4 Link to Facebook 0 4 5 12 Link to Twitter 7 7 17 0 5 10 15 20 0 5 DAX 2009 DAX 2011 DJIA 2009 DJIA 2011 Link to Facebook 2 4 12 0 5 10 15 20 NIKKEI CAC FTSE DAX DJIA N = 142 (no. of companies with social media on IR website). Number of companies with links to external social media platforms from their IR  website. Other: e.g. LinkedIn, Scibd, Dailymotion,  FourSquare.12 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 13. Majority is still sceptical and does not experiment with  more than 5 different tools Overview no. of different tools on IR website DJIA  30 25 20 15 NIKKEI 10 DAX  5 0 CAC FTSE 1­5 different tools 6­10 different tools More than 10 different tools N = 142 (no. of companies with social media on IR website). Number of companies using different tools on IR website.13 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 14. American blue chips are most engaged; Japanese  companies lack behind Comparison no. of publications via social media  300 249 250 213 199 200 157 150 140 133 126 108 105 95 100 67 54 50 34 36 29 33 22 23 21 20 25 17 17 18 15 76 10 10 7 3 0 00000 01000 01100 1 2 4 0 RSS feed Podcast Webcast Video cast Weblog Chat Wiki Share  IR app Other button DJIA DAX FTSE CAC NIKKEI N = 142 (no. of companies with social media on IR website). Number of publications via social media (e.g. videos, audio recordings, audio­ visual presentations) on IR website.14 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 15. DJIA: Increased social media usage in comparison to  2009; especially blogs gain importance DJIA 2009 to 2011 / Social media on IR website 300 281 249 250 221 213 199 200 150 140 126 100 85 50 2529 2529 2826 1814 1317 10 9 14 9 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RSS feed Podcast Webcast Video cast Weblog Chat Wiki Share button IR app DJIA (no. of companies 2009) DJIA (no. of companies 2011) DJIA (no. of publications 2009) DJIA (no. of publications 2011) N = 30 (no. of DJIA listed companies using different tools on IR website).15 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 16. DAX: Podcast lost ground; no significant improvements  in IR 2.0 practice  DAX 2009 to 2011 / Social media on IR website 180 157 160 138 140 133 123 120 108 109 100 80 60 40 33 26 27 21 22 21 22 20 15 13 13 12 15 15 6 6 2 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 RSS feed Podcast Webcast Video cast Weblog Chat Wiki Share button IR app DAX (no. of companies 2009) DAX (no. of companies 2011) DAX (no. of publications 2009) DAX (no. of publications 2011) N = 29 (no. of DAX listed companies using different tools on IR website).16 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 17. On a low level, dialogical approaches are on the rise Overview no. of dialogical tools on IR  DJIA / DAX 2009 to 2011 website 0 3 1 8 Tools with feedback or  Tools with feedback or  2 comment function comment function 8 3 14 14 2 4 28 47 Publications with  Publications with  feedback or comment  28 feedback or comment  function function 47 61 240 240 0 100 200 300 0 200 400 NIKKEI CAC FTSE DAX  DJIA  DAX 2009 DAX 2011 DJIA 2009 DJIA 2011 N = 142 (no. of companies with social media on IR website). Number of tools and publications via social media on IR website.17 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 18. Most blue chips communicate on at least one of the social  networks with IR participation Overview external engagement DJIA / DAX 2009 to 2011 Company’s presence  26 15 Company’s presence on at least 1 of  24 on at least 1 of the  29 22 external platform (all  the external platform (all topics) 28 28 29 topics) 28 0 Specific IR  0 Specific IR channel/account on at  0 channel/account on at  1 0 least 1 of the external  least 1 of the external platforms 2 2 1 platforms 2 6 IR engagement on at  20 IR engagement on at least 1 of the  14 22 18 least 1 of the external  external platforms 17 16 22 platforms 17 2 2 8 IR engagement on 2  11 IR engagement on 2 platforms 13 11 platforms 6 11 11 1 3 3 IR engagement on 3  7 IR engagement on 3 platforms 6 7 platforms 1 7 7 0 0 0 IR engagement on all 4  3 IR engagement on all 4 platforms 0 2 platforms 0 3 2 0 10 20 30 40 0 20 40 NIKKEI CAC FTSE DAX  DJIA  DJIA 2009 DJIA 2011 DAX 2009 DAX 2011 N = 118. Number of companies within the sample on external platforms (here: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or SlideShare); all topics.18 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 19. Twitter and YouTube as top channels for the publication  of IR relevant topics regarding no. of companies Overview IR presence in social networks 20 18 18 16 16 14 14 14 13 13 12 11 10 8 8 7 7 6 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DJIA  DAX  FTSE CAC NIKKEI IR presence on SlideShare IR SlideShare channel IR presence on YouTube IR YouTube channel IR presence on Twitter IR Twitter channel IR presence on Facebook IR Facebook channel N = 77. Number of companies on external platforms with IR topics (here: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or SlideShare).19 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 20. However, specific IR channels remain at a low level Comparison DJIA & DAX / IR presence in social networks 20 18 18 16 14 14 14 12 12 11 10 9 9 8 7 7 6 5 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 IR presence on  IR SlideShare  IR presence on  IR YouTube  IR presence on  IR Twitter  IR presence on  IR Facebook  SlideShare channel YouTube channel Twitter channel Facebook channel DJIA 2011 DJIA 2009 DAX 2011 DAX 2009 N = 39. Number of DJIA and DAX companies on external platforms with IR topics (here: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or SlideShare).20 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 21. Most intense use of Twitter and Facebook regarding no.  of publications Overview no. of publications on external platforms 0 14 20 Posts and comments  128 Posts and comments on Facebook 21 128 on Facebook 55 121 121 69 148 440 Tweets and re­tweets on Twitter 195 326 Tweets and re­tweets  326 375 on Twitter 447 1 375 17 Videos on YouTube 24 70 38 84 70 Videos on YouTube 0 35 0 Presentations on SlideShare 2 84 7 18 2 70 Presentations on  7 185 SlideShare Publications on external platforms 242 0 531 18 598 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 0 100 200 300 400 500 NIKKEI CAC FTSE DAX  DJIA  DAX 2009 DAX 2011 DJIA 2009 DJIA 2011 N = 77 (No. of companies on external platforms with IR topics). Number of publications on external platforms (here: Facebook, Twitter,  YouTube, or SlideShare).21 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 22. Social media are used for information and interpretion;  networking remains marginally considered Basic functions of social media (no. of companies) 2 9 28 111 Basic functions of social media on the IR website: networking 4 17 107 22 Basic functions of social media on the IR website: interpretation 1 11 45 93 Basic functions of social media on the IR website: structuring 7 33 95 15 Basic functions of social media on the IR website: information 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 fully applicable (100 per cent) largely applicable (50­75 per cent) partly applicable (25­50 per cent) not applicable (0 per cent) Basic functions  of social software, see Zerfaß & Sandhu, 2008: information (e.g., RSS feeds), structuring (e.g., social bookmarks, wikis),  interpretation (e.g., podcasts, video casts, and blogs) and networking (e.g., social communities). Category in content analysis: Degree to which  each function is fulfilled: 3 =  fully applicable (to 100 per cent appropriate), 2 = largely applicable (to 50­75 per cent appropriate), 1 = partly  applicable (to 25­50 per cent appropriate), 0 = not applicable (to 0 per cent appropriate). N = 142 (category analyzed for companies using  social media on the IR website). 22 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 23. Differences between indices: FTSE and CAC use social  media for interpretation, Nikkei only for information,  DJIA and DAX are most balanced on a low level Country­specific characteristics of investor relations 2.0 Social media function  N Average SD F p Information DAX 30 1.30 0,651 3.806 0.006 DJIA 30 1.47 0.681 FTSE 30 1.10 0.607 CAC 30 0.87 0.507 NIKKEI 30 1.33 0.802 Structuring DAX 30 0.67 0.661 3.266 0.013 DJIA 30 0.63 0.718 FTSE 30 0.47 0.776 CAC 30 0.43 0.568 NIKKEI 30 0.13 0.434 Interpretation DAX 30 1.07 0.450 10.758 < 0.001 DJIA 30 1.33 0.711 FTSE 30 1.23 0.504 CAC 30 0.97 0.414 NIKKEI 30 0.50 0.572 Networking DAX 30 0.50 0.861 16.616 < 0.001 DJIA 30 1.00 0.743 FTSE 30 0.10 0.305 CAC 30 0.10 0.305 NIKKEI 30 0.03 0.183 Basic functions  of social software, see Zerfaß & Sandhu, 2008: information (e.g., RSS feeds), structuring (e.g., social bookmarks, wikis), interpretation  (e.g., podcasts, video casts, and blogs) and networking (e.g., social communities). Category in content analysis: Degree to which each function is fulfilled:  3 =  fully applicable (to 100 per cent appropriate), 2 = largely applicable (to 50­75 per cent appropriate), 1 = partly applicable (to 25­50 per cent  appropriate), 0 = not applicable (to 0 per cent appropriate). N = 150 (category analysed for companies using social media on the IR website). Average =  mean score; SD = standard deviation; F = F­ratio for one­way ANOVA F­test statistic. Results significant for p < 0.05. Rounded figures. Significant  differences between groups (here: indices) according to social media functions  found. Post hoc tests revealed further insights, see Koehler (2011).23 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 24. Financials, CSR and non­standard issues as most  common topics Topics24 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 25. Software, technology and telecommunications  outperform, but no significant correlation between  industrial sector and IR engagement could be found Mean values industrial sector One­way ANOVA tests found no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05).25 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 26. Surprisingly, B2B more engaged in social media when it  comes to financial communications Mean values sales market One­way ANOVA tests found no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05).26 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 27. Within German companies, DAX outperforms but smaller  indices significantly gain ground Social media usage on IR website 45 41 40 35 35 30 29 29 25 25 20 20 16 15 15 10 5 0 DAX MDAX TecDAX SDAX Social media on IR website 2011 Social media on IR website 2009 N = 115 (2011) / 95 (2009). Number of companies with internal IR 2.0 engagement, German indices only.27 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 28. Findings for German indices correspond with data for  international usage: screencasts on top Overview applications on IR  Overview applications on IR  website 2011 website 2009 RSS feed RSS feed 30 30 Feedback tools Podcast Feedback tools Podcast 25 25 20 20 Other Webcast Other 15 Webcast 15 10 10 5 5 IR app 0 Video cast IR app 0 Video cast External link Weblog External link Weblog Share button Chat Share button Chat Wiki Wiki DAX MDAX TecDAX SDAX DAX MDAX TecDAX SDAX N = 115 (2011) ) / 95 (2009). Number of companies with internal IR 2.0 engagement, German indices only. Other: e.g. social media survey,  live stream without filing, instant messaging reminder, skype, virtual shareholder magazines. External link: Link to external social media  platforms (e.g. FourSquare, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter).28 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 29. German IROs gradually pay attention to external  platforms, also among small and mid caps Overview IR presence in social networks 16 14 14 14 12 12 11 10 9 8 8 7 7 7 6 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 11 1111 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 0 0 0 00 0 0 00 0 0 0 DAX 2011 DAX 2009 MDAX 2011 MDAX 2009 TecDAX 2011 TecDAX 2009 SDAX 2011 SDAX 2009 IR presence on SlideShare IR SlideShare channel IR presence on YouTube IR YouTube channel IR presence on Twitter IR Twitter channel IR presence on Facebook IR Facebook channel N = 51 (2011) / 27 (2009). Number of companies with IR 2.0 engagement on external platforms (here: YouTube, Twitter, Facebook,  SlideShare); German indices only.29 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 30. However, specific IR channels are not yet perceived  valuable for financial communications at large;  improvements within small and mid caps Overview no. of publications on external platforms 18 17 16 16 15 14 12 11 10 10 9 8 7 7 6 6 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DAX 2011 DAX 2009 MDAX 2011 MDAX 2009 TecDAX 2011 TecDAX 2009 SDAX 2011 SDAX 2009 IR engagement on all 4 platforms IR engagement on at least 3 platforms IR engagement on at least 2 platforms IR engagement on at least 1 of the external platforms Specific IR channel/account on at least 1 of the external platforms N = 51 (2011) / 27 (2009). Number of companies with IR 2.0 engagement on external platforms (here: YouTube, Twitter, Facebook,  SlideShare); German indices only. Specific IR channels: YouTube: Gesco AG (SDAX); Twitter: Deutsche EuroShop AG, HHLAG (both MDAX),  Qiagen, QSC AG (both TecDAX), Balda AG (SDAX); Facebook: Deutsche EuroShop AG, HHLAG (both MDAX), C.A.T. oil AG (SDAX); SlideShare:  Balda AG (SDAX).30 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 31. Best practices IR 2.031 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 32. BASF (DAX) as IR 2.0 pioneer 32 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 33. Allianz (DAX) offers investor relations app33 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 34. Online shareholder meeting by Walmart (DJIA)34 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 35. elringklinger (MDAX) introduced live chat with CEO35 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 36. Surprisingly, Deutsche Bank (DAX) canceled present live  chat with retail investors in 201136 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 37. Bayer (DAX) interested in shareholders‘ social media  demands37 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 38. Deutsche EuroShop (MDAX) launched IR blog38 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 39. Alcatel­Lucent (CAC) with no specific IR blog but  corporate one deals with IR topics39 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 40. IBM (DJIA) offers RSS feeds for specific IR occasions40 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 41. Deutsche Beteiligungs AG (SDAX) includes feedback  function in webcast presentation41 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 42. Munich RE (DAX) with specific shareholders‘ portal42 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 43. Mitsubishi (Nikkei) with investors‘ newsroom43 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 44. SABMiller (FTSE) with special IR website on takeover44 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 45. Deutsche Boerse (DAX) and Nyse Euronext provide  similar online services45 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 46. Even though highly sensitive, social media seem  applicable to accompany M&A transactions / AT&T (DJIA)  with videos, blog posts, webcasts46 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 47. SAP (DAX) investor relations Twitter channel47 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 48. Deutsche Euroshop (MDAX) proves that broad social  media engagement does not necessarily demands high  personal ressources48 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 49. Summary of findings _ Social media gained importance within investor relations departments _ Internationally, U.S. blue chips are on the forefront _ However, German companies outperform in comparison to French,  Japanese or British ones _ Social media networks and other external platforms are still  underrepresented in online IR _ Most companies employ different social media tools on their IR website  and support their online financial communications in regard to interactive  features, multimedia, but not shareholder dialogue or networking _ Best practices prove adaptability of social media within investor relations _ Further research is dedicated to focus on users‘ demands: Are social media  really appropriate for investor relations purposes? Which would be the  right channels? Which would be the appropriate type of communication? _ Country­specific differences within the recent study are critical for further  analysis (cultural differences as well as characteristics of the occupational  field, online usage patterns, etc.)49 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 50. References _ Köhler, K. (2011). Investor relations 2.0 – Status quo of online financial  communications. Paper presented at EUPRERA annual conference, Leeds, UK,  September 2011. _ Köhler, K. (2010). Investor Relations und Social Media. Benchmarkstudie zur Praxis  der Finanzkommunikation im Web 2.0 bei börsennotierten Unternehmen in  Deutschland [Investor relations and social media]. DIRK Forschungsreihe, Vol. 17.  Mu!nchen: Going Public Media AG. _ Weber, C. (2009). Online­Finanzkommunikation [Online financial communications]. In  K. R. Kirchhoff & M. Piwinger (Eds.) Praxishandbuch Investor Relations. Das  Standardwerk der Finanzkommunikation [Handbook investor relations], (2nd rev.  Ed.) (pp. 393­414). Wiesbaden: Gabler. _ Zerfaß, A. & Sandhu, S. (2008). Interaktive Kommunikation, Social Web und Open  Innovation. Herausforderungen und Wirkungen im Unternehmenskontext [Interactive  communication, social web and open innovation. Challenges and effects for  organizations]. In A. Zerfaß, M. Welker & J. Schmidt (Eds.) Kommunikation,  Partizipation und Wirkungen im Social Web. Band 2: Strategien und Anwendungen:  Perspektiven für Wirtschaft, Politik, Publizistik [Communication, participation and  effects of the social web. Volume 2: Perspectives for business, politics and the media]  (pp. 283­310). Köln: Herbert von Halem Verlag.50 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 51. Appendix: Index composition _ Each index represents the top listed companies in the respective  country/at the respective stock exchange.  _ From each index, the top 30 constituent companies according to weight  within size indices were chosen to enable a comparative design: The  German DAX and the U.S. DJIA both consist of 30 values. The Japanese  Nikkei comprises 225, the French CAC 40 and the UK based FTSE 100 the  100 most highly capitalized listed companies. DJIA and NIKKEI are price­ weighted stock market indeces; DAX, CAC and FTSE are market­value­ weighted indeces. _ Index composition according to January 6, 2011. _ DJIA: 3M Co., Alcoa Inc., American Express Co., AT&T Inc., Bank of America Corp.,  Boeing Co., Caterpillar Inc., Chevron Corp., Cisco Systems Inc., Coca­Cola Co., E.I.  DuPont de Nemours & Co., Exxon Mobil Corp., General Electric Co., Hewlett­Packard  Co., Home Depot Inc., Intel Corp., International Business Machines Corp., Johnson &  Johnson, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Kraft Foods Inc., McDonalds Corp., Merck & Co.  Inc., Microsoft Corp., Pfizer Inc., Procter & Gamble Co., Travelers Cos. Inc., United  Technologies Corp., Verizon Communications Inc., Wal­Mart Stores Inc., Walt Disney  Co. 51 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 52. Appendix: Index composition cont‘d _ DAX: adidas AG, Allianz SE, BASF SE, Bayer AG, Beiersdorf AG, BMW AG,  Commerzbank AG, Daimler AG, Deutsche Bank AG, Deutsche Börse AG, Deutsche  Lufthansa AG, Deutsche Post AG, Deutsche Telekom AG, E.ON AG, Fresenius Medical  Care AG & Co. KGaA, Fresenius SE, HeidelbergCement AG, Henkel AG & Co. KGaA,  Infineon Technologies AG, K+S AG, Linde AG, MAN SE, Merck KGaA, Metro AG,  Münchener Rück AG, RWE AG, SAP AG, Siemens AG, ThyssenKrupp AG, Volkswagen  AG _ FTSE: Anglo American plc, AstraZeneca plc, Aviva plc, BAE Systems plc, Barclays plc,  BG Group plc, BHP Billiton plc, BP plc, British American Tobacco plc, BT Group plc,  Centrica plc, Diageo plc, GlaxoSmithKline plc, HSBC Holdings plc, Imperial Tobacco  Group plc, Lloyds Banking Group plc, National Grid plc, Prudential plc, Reckitt  Benckiser Group plc, Rio Tinto Group plc, Rolls­Royce Holdings plc, Royal Dutch Shell  plc, SABMiller plc , Scottish and Southern Energy plc, Standard Chartered plc, Tesco  plc, Tullow Oil plc, Unilever plc, Vodafone Group plc, Xstrata plc52 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 53. Appendix: Index composition cont‘d _ CAC: Air Liquide SA, Alcatel­Lucent SA, Alstom SA, Arcelormittal SA, AXA SA, BNP  Paribas SA, Carrefour SA, Credit Agricole SA, Danone SA, EADS, Essilor Intl. SA,  France Telecom SA, GDF Suez SA, LOréal SA, Lafarge SA, LVMH SA, Michelin SCA,  Pernod Ricard SA, PPR SA, Renault SA, Saint Gobain SA, Sanofi­Aventis SA,  Schneider Electric SA, Societe Generale SA, Total SA, Unibail­Rodamco SA, Vallourec  SA, Veolia Environ. SA, Vinci SA, Vivendi SA _ Nikkei: Canon Inc., Denso Corp., East Japan Railway Co., Fanuc Corp., Hitachi Ltd.,  Honda Motor Co. Ltd., Inpex Corp., Japan Tobacco Inc., KDDI Corp., Komatsu Ltd.,  Kyocera Corp., Mitsubishi Corp., Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Mitsubishi Estate Co. Ltd.,  Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group Inc., Mitsui & Co. Ltd., Mizuho Financial Group Inc.,  Nippon Steel Corp., Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., NTT Corp., Panasonic Corp., Seven & I  Holdings Co. Ltd., Shin­Etsu Chemical Co. Ltd., Softbank Corp., Sony Corp.,  Sumitomo Corp., Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokyo Marine Holdings Inc.,  Toshiba Corp., Toyota Motor Corp. (Weighting of Nikkei 225 indexs components according to market capitalisation)53 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 54. Appendix: Index composition cont‘d _ German indixes TecDAX, MDAX and SDAX are market­value­weighted  indeces. _ Index composition according to January 6, 2011. _ All companies within each German index were part of analysis. _ MDAX: Aareal Bank AG, Aurubis AG, Axel Springer AG, BayWa AG, Bilfinger Berger  SE, Brenntag AG, Celesio AG, Continental AG, Demag Cranes AG, Deutsche EuroShop  AG, Deutsche Wohnen AG, Douglas Holding AG, ElringKlinger AG, EADS, Fielmann  AG, Fraport AG, Fuchs Petrolub AG, GAGFAH S.A., GEA Group Aktiengesellschaft,  Gerresheimer AG, Gildemeister AG, Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG, Hannover  Rückversicherung AG, Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, Hochtief AG, Hugo Boss AG,  IVG Immobilien AG, Kabel Deutschland Holding AG, Klöckner & Co. SE, Krones AG,  LANXESS AG, Leoni AG, MTU Aero Engines Holding AG, Praktiker Bau­ und  Heimwerkermärkte Holding AG, ProSiebenSat.1 Media AG, Puma AG, Rational AG,  Rheinmetall AG, RHÖN­KLINIKUM AG, Salzgitter AG, SGL Carbon SE, Sky  Deutschland AG, STADA Arzneimittel AG, Südzucker AG, Symrise AG, Tognum AG,  TUI AG, Vossloh AG, Wacker Chemie AG, WINCOR NIXDORF Aktiengesellschaft54 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 55. Appendix: Index composition cont‘d _ TecDAX: ADVA Optical Networking, Aixtron AG, BB Biotech AG, Bechtle AG, Carl Zeiss  Meditec AG, centrotherm photovoltaics AG, Conergy AG, Dialog Semiconductor plc,  Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA, Drillisch AG, EVOTEC AG, Freenet AG, Jenoptik AG,  Kontron AG, Manz Automation AG, MorphoSys AG, Nordex AG, Pfeiffer Vacuum  Technology AG, Phoenix Solar AG, Q­Cells SE, Qiagen, QSC AG,  Roth & Rau AG,  Singulus Technologies, SMA Solar Technology AG, Software AG, SolarWorld AG,  STRATEC Biomedical Systems AG, United Internet AG, Wirecard AG _ SDAX: Air Berlin PLC, alstria office REIT AG, Amadeus Fire AG, Balda AG, Bauer AG,  Bertrandt AG, Biotest AG, C.A.T. oil AG, CENTROTEC Sustainable AG, CeWe Color  Holding AG, Colonia Real Estate AG, comdirect bank AG, Constantin Medien AG, CTS  Eventim AG, Delticom AG, Deutsche Beteiligungs AG, DEUTZ AG, DIC Asset AG, Dürr  AG, elexis AG, Gerry Weber International AG, Gesco AG, GfK SE, Grammer AG,  GRENKELEASING AG, H&R WASAG AG, Hawesko Holding AG, Highlight  Communications AG, Homag Group AG, Hornbach Holding AG, Indus Holding AG,  Jungheinrich AG, Koenig & Bauer AG, KUKA AG, KWS SAAT AG, Medion AG, MLP AG,  MVV Energie AG, PATRIZIA Immobilien AG, Pfleiderer AG, SAF Holland S.A., Sixt AG,  SKW Stahl­Metallurgie Holding AG, Ströer Out­of­home Media AG, TAG Immobilien  AG, TAKKT AG, Tipp24 SE, TOM TAILOR Holding AG, VTG AG, Wacker Neuson SE55 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 56. Copyright and reproduction of results _ The material presented in this document represents empirical insights and  interpretation by the author. It is intellectual property subject to  international copyright. Publication date: August 2011.  _ You are welcome to quote from the content of this survey and reproduce  any graphics, subject to the condition that the source including the  internet address is clearly quoted and depicted on every chart.  _ Suggested citation for this document (APA style)  Koehler, K. (2011): Investor relations 2.0. An international benchmark  study (Chart Version). Leipzig: University of Leipzig (available at:  http://www.slideshare.net/communicationmanagement) 56 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de
  • 57. Contact Kristin Koehler, M.A. University of Leipzig, Germany Research Assistant Institute of Communication and Media Studies Department Communication Management and Public Relations (Prof. Dr. Ansgar Zerfass) kristin.koehler@uni­leipzig.de www.communciationmanagement.de57 / Kristin Koehler | University of Leipzig  | www.communicationmanagement.de