TACTICAL
OPERATIONAL
WHICH LEVEL OF WAR
IS
MOST IMPORTANT?
STRATEGIC
Strategic
Operational
Tactical
Strategic
Operational
Tactical
- Based on Figure 2-2, JFSC Pub 1, 2000
Fundamentals of Joint
Operations
 Principles of War:
 Objective
 Offensive
 Mass
 Economy of force
 Maneuver
 Unity of command
 Security
 Surprise...
JOINT
FORCE
COMMANDER
JOINT
OPERATIONS
OPERATIONS WITH
INTERGOVERNMENTAL
ORGANIZATIONS
MULTINATIONAL
OPERATIONS
OPERATIONS...
1. Command & Control
2. Intelligence
3. Fires
4. Movement & Maneuver
5. Protection
6. Sustainment
JP 3-0 (CH 2), pp. III-1...
 Joint force options
 Component options
 SOF employment options
 Standing joint force headquarters (core element)
 De...
Core Staff
Building Upon the Core Staff
Geographic
Combatant
Commander’s Standing
Joint Force
Headquarters Deployable
Join...
 Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process
input
 Assignment of subordinate commanders
 Relations with Dep...
 Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process
input
 Assignment of subordinate commanders
 Relations with Dep...
 Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process
input
 Assignment of subordinate commanders
 Relations with Dep...
 Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process
input
 Assignment of subordinate commanders
 Relations with Dep...
Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), Figure II-3
Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), Figure II-4
Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), Figure II-5
1. Identify Operation ANACONDA command & control
issues. Explain their significance.
2. Based on assigned readings, diagra...
Grossman, Elaine M. “Army Analyst Blames Afghan Battle Failings
on Bad Command Set-Up.” Inside the Pentagon, 29 July 2004
...
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Joint operations

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Joint operations

  1. 1. TACTICAL OPERATIONAL WHICH LEVEL OF WAR IS MOST IMPORTANT? STRATEGIC
  2. 2. Strategic Operational Tactical
  3. 3. Strategic Operational Tactical - Based on Figure 2-2, JFSC Pub 1, 2000
  4. 4. Fundamentals of Joint Operations
  5. 5.  Principles of War:  Objective  Offensive  Mass  Economy of force  Maneuver  Unity of command  Security  Surprise  Simplicity • Additional principles: – Restraint – Perseverance – Legitimacy Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), p. II-2
  6. 6. JOINT FORCE COMMANDER JOINT OPERATIONS OPERATIONS WITH INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS MULTINATIONAL OPERATIONS OPERATIONS WITH US GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES OPERATIONS WITH NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Figure II-2, Joint Pub 3-0, (CH 2)
  7. 7. 1. Command & Control 2. Intelligence 3. Fires 4. Movement & Maneuver 5. Protection 6. Sustainment JP 3-0 (CH 2), pp. III-1 “Related capabilities and activities grouped together to help JFCs integrate, synchronize, and direct joint operations.”
  8. 8.  Joint force options  Component options  SOF employment options  Standing joint force headquarters (core element)  Deployable JTF augmentation cell (DJTFAC) JP 3-0 (CH 2), pp. II-11 – II-15
  9. 9. Core Staff Building Upon the Core Staff Geographic Combatant Commander’s Standing Joint Force Headquarters Deployable Joint Task Force Augmentation Cell Liaison Officers Joint/Multinational Individual Augmentees Joint Organization Augmentees The Interagency Army Corps Marine Expeditionary Force Numbered Fleet Numbered Air Force JP 3-33, Figure II-1
  10. 10.  Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process input  Assignment of subordinate commanders  Relations with Department of Defense agencies  Directive authority for logistics  Authoritative direction for all military operations and joint training  Organize and employ commands and forces  Assign command functions to subordinates  Establish plans/requirements for ISR activity  Suspend subordinate commanders from duty  Local direction and control of movements or maneuvers to accomplish mission  Aid, assist, protect, or sustain another organization Combatant Command (Command Authority) Based on Figure III-2, Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2)
  11. 11.  Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process input  Assignment of subordinate commanders  Relations with Department of Defense agencies  Directive authority for logistics  Authoritative direction for all military operations and joint training  Organize and employ commands and forces  Assign command functions to subordinates  Establish plans/requirements for ISR activity  Suspend subordinate commanders from duty  Local direction and control of movements or maneuvers to accomplish mission  Aid, assist, protect, or sustain another organization Operational Control (OPCON) Based on Figure III-2, Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2)
  12. 12.  Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process input  Assignment of subordinate commanders  Relations with Department of Defense agencies  Directive authority for logistics  Authoritative direction for all military operations and joint training  Organize and employ commands and forces  Assign command functions to subordinates  Establish plans/requirements for ISR activity  Suspend subordinate commanders from duty  Local direction and control of movements or maneuvers to accomplish mission  Aid, assist, protect, or sustain another organization Tactical Control (TACON) Based on Figure III-2, Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2)
  13. 13.  Planning, programming, budgeting and execution process input  Assignment of subordinate commanders  Relations with Department of Defense agencies  Directive authority for logistics  Authoritative direction for all military operations and joint training  Organize and employ commands and forces  Assign command functions to subordinates  Establish plans/requirements for ISR activity  Suspend subordinate commanders from duty  Local direction and control of movements or maneuvers to accomplish mission  Aid, assist, protect, or sustain another organization Support Based on Figure III-2, Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2)
  14. 14. Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), Figure II-3
  15. 15. Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), Figure II-4
  16. 16. Joint Pub 3-0 (CH 2), Figure II-5
  17. 17. 1. Identify Operation ANACONDA command & control issues. Explain their significance. 2. Based on assigned readings, diagram the C2 arrangements for Operation ANACONDA. Include organizational options and command relationships, from the combatant command through task forces. 3. Identify and explain why the following operational areas could have been established or likely would not have been designated during the operation: AOR, Theater of War, Theater of Operations, JOA, AOA, JSOA, AO, JSA. 4. Based on your assigned doctrine readings, diagram the C2 arrangements that could have been established for Operation ANACONDA. Include organizational options, and command relationships, from the combatant command through task forces.
  18. 18. Grossman, Elaine M. “Army Analyst Blames Afghan Battle Failings on Bad Command Set-Up.” Inside the Pentagon, 29 July 2004 JFSC Publication 1, The Joint Staff Officers Guide 2000, August 2011 JP 3-0, Joint Operations, 11 August 2011. JP 3-33, Joint Taskforce Headquarters, 30 July 2012 JP 5-0, Joint Operation Planning, 26 December 2006

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