Etruscan Art<br />
Map of the Mediterranean region ca. 500 BC <br />
Fibula with Orientalizing lions. Found in a tomb in Cerveteri (near Tarchna). 650 BC. Size: 1’.<br />
Model of a typical sixth-century BC Etruscan temple as described by Vitruvius<br />
Model of a typical sixth-century BC Etruscan temple as described by Vitruvius<br />6th-cent. BC Greek Doric temple<br />
Lifesize statue of Apulu (Apollo), painted terracotta figure from roof of Portonaccio temple in Veii, Italy, ca. 500 BC<br />
Kore, Athens, ca. 510 BCE<br />Apulu (Apollo), painted terracotta figure from roof of Portonaccio temple in Veii, Italy, c...
Sarcophagus with reclining couple, from Cerveteri, Italy. Ca. 520 BCE. Painted terracotta<br />
Tumulus in Banditaccia necropolis, Cerveteri, Italy. 7th-2nd cent. BC. Note tufa bedrock<br />
Interior of the Tomb of the Reliefs, Cerveteri. 3rd cent. BC.<br />
Interior of Tomb of Leopards, Tarquinia. 5th cent. BC.<br />
Details of Etruscan tomb interiors, 5th cent. BC<br />
PortaMarzia (Gate of Mars), Perugia, Italy, 2nd cent. BC<br />
PortaMarzia, Perugia <br />2nd cent. BC.<br />Arch formed by a series of voussoirs framed by pilasters<br />
AuleMetele, from Cortona, Italy, 1stcent. BC. Bronze, 5’7” high.<br />
Capitoline Wolf, from Rome, Italy (suckling infants are later additions). <br />
Capitoline Wolf, from Rome, Italy (suckling infants are later additions). DATE 500 BC????<br />
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2011 survey etruscan

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  • Natural positioning, the way people may be posed in a symposium
  • Volcanic stone – called Tufa. Romans used this. Had certain advantages, before it is dug up, it is quite soft, almost like clay
  • Types of sarcophogai. Tombs would be places in the niches. The decorations is derived from the designs of contemporary
  • Connected to natural depictions in Greek art, also Egyptian influences, especially in the differentiating skin tones of the males and females. Shows musicians playing, and spectators being served from basins.
  • Shows fishers, divers, bird, and a scene of hunting. Pleasant, natural landscape that sound accompany the deceased in death. These images from the tombs are from the 5th and 6th centuries BCE, when Etruscans were at the height of their power. Afterward, the Romans began to gain more power. And Etruscan culture was infiltrated into Roman art and culture.
  • One of the only evidences of architecture. Designed to be a city gate, leading into the city. It was incorporated into a wall that was built around the medieval period.
  • Significant architecture because it provides one of the first systems of architecture that is perfected by the Romans. It combines Greek architecture with their own. The use of applied column, with tablature. Not full, rounded, free standing columns – applied decoratively as a flat surface: called pilasters. Clear Greek influence. The Arch, however, was never seen within Greek architecture – it was considered not worthy of representation architecture. The Romans, however, recognized it for its superior qualities of support. The sculpture that is seen are figures of classical mythology. Jupiter, flanked by his two sons Castor and Pollix (sp?) They represent a symbol of power, to declare the power of the city, as depicted in the art.
  • Later Etruscan art is characterized by extreme high quality. Sculptures not make with terracotta, but cast bronze. This figure was made at the time when Romans were gaining extreme amounts of power. What characterizes this figure as Etruscan is the inscription. This figure has his hand raised, to indicate that he is a public speaker. He raises his hand so as to call a crowd of people to order before speaking. He is wearing an outfit that expresses that he is of high Roman order. Shows the collaboration and influence of Rome on Etruscan art
  • Capitoline because it was associated with the Capitol Hill in Rome. This sculpture is based on the legend that the founders of Rome were the brothers Romulus and Remus, who were raised by a wolf.
  • The infants were later added during the renaissance. The original sculptures of Romulus and Remuswere lost.
  • 2011 survey etruscan

    1. 1. Etruscan Art<br />
    2. 2. Map of the Mediterranean region ca. 500 BC <br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. Fibula with Orientalizing lions. Found in a tomb in Cerveteri (near Tarchna). 650 BC. Size: 1’.<br />
    5. 5. Model of a typical sixth-century BC Etruscan temple as described by Vitruvius<br />
    6. 6. Model of a typical sixth-century BC Etruscan temple as described by Vitruvius<br />6th-cent. BC Greek Doric temple<br />
    7. 7. Lifesize statue of Apulu (Apollo), painted terracotta figure from roof of Portonaccio temple in Veii, Italy, ca. 500 BC<br />
    8. 8. Kore, Athens, ca. 510 BCE<br />Apulu (Apollo), painted terracotta figure from roof of Portonaccio temple in Veii, Italy, ca. 500 BCE<br />
    9. 9. Sarcophagus with reclining couple, from Cerveteri, Italy. Ca. 520 BCE. Painted terracotta<br />
    10. 10. Tumulus in Banditaccia necropolis, Cerveteri, Italy. 7th-2nd cent. BC. Note tufa bedrock<br />
    11. 11. Interior of the Tomb of the Reliefs, Cerveteri. 3rd cent. BC.<br />
    12. 12. Interior of Tomb of Leopards, Tarquinia. 5th cent. BC.<br />
    13. 13. Details of Etruscan tomb interiors, 5th cent. BC<br />
    14. 14. PortaMarzia (Gate of Mars), Perugia, Italy, 2nd cent. BC<br />
    15. 15. PortaMarzia, Perugia <br />2nd cent. BC.<br />Arch formed by a series of voussoirs framed by pilasters<br />
    16. 16. AuleMetele, from Cortona, Italy, 1stcent. BC. Bronze, 5’7” high.<br />
    17. 17. Capitoline Wolf, from Rome, Italy (suckling infants are later additions). <br />
    18. 18. Capitoline Wolf, from Rome, Italy (suckling infants are later additions). DATE 500 BC????<br />
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