2011 survey early_and_high_classic

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  • Common to know Greek artists in this period, signatures were placed on vasesThis period marks the rise of Greek poetry and writings
  • Understanding of the Greek human form and the human bodyDepictions of warExekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy – slide 3
  • Types of Figures: Black Figure and Red FigureDevelopment difference: black developed earlier, made my applying a back silhouette color to a red vaseDetails carved through the black silhouette, creates a stylized form, easy to produce geometric patternsDoesn’t allow for great flexibilityScenes of mythology from the Trojan wars, also of frivolity, these were luxurious itemsExekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in ItalyEuthymides, Three revelers, Athenian red-figure amphora, ca. 510 BC. Found in Italy – slide 4
  • Statues symbolizing perfect bodily and heavenly depictionsFreestanding sculptures placed in public placesKouros, Anavysos near Athens, ca. 530 BCKritios Boy, Athens, ca. 480 BC.Figure demonstrates contrapposto – slide 6Differences in musculature, and the way the figure standsSlide 6 – as opposed to rigid stance set up at tomb sites, produced a more lifelike imagePlacing the weight of the body on one legContinual development of understanding of human boyd and it’s depiction
  • Sculpture found on a ship that sunk – slide 7Shows that Greek sculpture was so popular that it was being shipped to other destinationsSculptures made of bronze – great valueAt some point later melted down to regain the metal to create armor for warBronze statue of a warrior, found under the sea near Riace, Italy, ca. 460 BCBronze sculpture was the preferred methodTorso and sculpture slightly turned. Shows movementBronze is ideal for this movement
  • Slide 8 – plaster mold, wax creation for sculpturesPlaster mold can be easily reproduced
  • Slide 9 – Romans preferred marble for creation of their statuesPopular image of the discus thrower – would have been set up in arenas and stadiumsMyron, Diskobolos (Discus Thrower), Roman marble copy of a bronze original of ca. 450 BCEWanted to create a more perfect form that what the human body appeared as in reality
  • This process led to a canonization of the forms of the human boydPolykleitos, Doryphoros (Spear Thrower), Roman marble copy from Pompeii, after a Greek bronze original of ca. 450 BC. The statue demonstrates Polykleitos’sCanon, a harmonic system of proportion. – slide 10System of harmony – divine perfection
  • Pediment sculpture within architecture – Acropolis, AthensWord Acropolis means upper or high cityA natural hill, in the center of AthensOntop of the hill – the city was built – slide 11
  • Temple of Athena, patroness of Athens was built – slide 13Similar ideas of perfection in architectureForms become harmonicIktinos and Kallikrates, Parthenon (Temple of Athena Parthenos), Acropolis, Athens, 447-438 BCEGreeks combined concepts of visuality, geometry, etc. 
  • Slide 14 – pediment sculptureInterest in larger forms of the human body
  • Slide 15 - Phidias, sculpture from Parthenon pedimentLargely female forms – tells the story of Athena’s lifePhidias – designed the layout of the acropolis 
  • Slide 17: Erectheion, Acropolis, Athens, 421-405 BCIonic order of columns – smallerErectheius was a previous KingSlide 18: Porch of the Caryatids, Erectheion, Acropolis, Athens, 421-405 BCA group of women processing towards the ParthenonClassical style of sculptureThe women are the columns of the temple
  • Slide 19 – detail of the CaryatidsThey are rigid formsNew discovery of naturalism in art – innovation that Greeks produced in this period 

Transcript

  • 1. Greece: Early and High Classical periods
  • 2. Exekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy
    Krater from the Dipylon cemetery in Athens, Greece, ca. 740 BC
  • 3. Detail, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, byExekias. Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy
  • 4. Exekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy
    Euthymides, Three revelers, Athenian red-figure amphora, ca. 510 BC. Found in Italy
  • 5. Temple of Aphaia,
    Aegina, warrior from west pediment (late 6th cent. BC)
    Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, warrior from east pediment (early 5th cent. BC)
  • 6. Kouros, Anavysosnear Athens, ca. 530 BC
    Kritios Boy, Athens, ca. 480 BC.
    Figure demonstrates contrapposto
  • 7. Bronze statue of a warrior, found under the sea near Riace, Italy, ca. 460 BC
    Kritios Boy, Athens, ca. 480 BC
  • 8. Explanation of the “lost wax” process of bronze casting
  • 9. Bronze statue of a warrior, found under the sea near Riace, Italy, ca. 460 BCE
    Myron, Diskobolos (Discus Thrower), Roman marble copy of a bronze original of ca. 450 BCE
  • 10. Polykleitos, Doryphoros (Spear Thrower), Roman marble copy from Pompeii, after a Greek bronze original of ca. 450 BC. The statue demonstrates Polykleitos’sCanon, a harmonic system of proportion.
  • 11. Acropolis, Athens
  • 12. Reconstruction drawing of the Athenian Acropolis
  • 13. Iktinosand Kallikrates, Parthenon (Temple of Athena Parthenos), Acropolis, Athens, 447-438 BCE
  • 14.
  • 15. Phidias, sculpture from Parthenon pediment
  • 16. Temple of Aphaia
    Parthenon
  • 17. Erectheion, Acropolis, Athens, 421-405 BC
  • 18. Porch of the Caryatids,
    Erectheion, Acropolis, Athens, 421-405 BC
  • 19. Porch of the Caryatids,
    Erectheion, Acropolis, Athens, 421-405 BC