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Kore, Athens, ca. 510 BC<br />
Greece: Transition from Archaic to Classical periods<br />
Temple of Hera I, Paestum, Italy, ca. 550 BC<br />
Medusa and two panthers from the west pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.<br />
Lamassu from DurSharrukin. 8th c. BC<br />Lion Gate at Hattusa (in modern-day Turkey), ca. 1400 BC. Built as an entrance t...
West pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.<br />
Temple of Hera I, Paestum, Italy, ca. 550 BC<br />Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC<br />
Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC, <br />				with reconstruction drawing<br />
Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC, <br />				with reconstruction drawing<br />Remains of pediment sculpture...
Details from Temple of Aphaiapediment sculpture<br />
Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC (reconstruction drawing)<br />West pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Cor...
Aegina, warrior from west pediment<br />Aegina, warrior from east pediment<br />
Exekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy<br />Krater from...
Detail, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, byExekias. Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy<br />
Exekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy<br />Euthymides,...
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2011 survey -_archaic_greece

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  • Slide 1: exhibits the perfect form of a women, idealized formGreece: Transition from Archaic to Classical periods
  • Slide 4: Temple of Hera I, Paestum, Italy, ca. 550 BCHas a masculine and massive qualityArchitecture is characterized by genders of styleOne of the earliest Doric forms that remains intactExtremely heavyGreeks were attuned to heavy elementsPortions become more refined in the transition to the classical periodThe columns taper toward the top – and curve out slightly toward to middle to suggest a weight that is pushing it townThe Greek developed entasis – a technique of a column with a budging middleUsed tricks called emphasis to suggest weight
  • Slide 5 – ancient pediment of the buildingMedusa and two panthers from the west pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.Images on the temple pediment are always associated with the god the temple is dedicated toDepicts stories about the god or goddessIn the Artemis temple: images on two sidesOne depicts the legend of the Trojan warThese epic themes were popular among Greek architecture, also storytellingSlide 5- depicts Medusa in the center – terrifying image of Homer’sWhen mortals gazed upon her, they were turned to stone
  • The way her body is turning is very typical of this Archaic period, as if she is in a running stanceShe is flanked by two panthersRelated to ancient Mesopotamian imagery – slide 6, apotrophaic imageryGreeks were influenced by Mesopotamian art
  • Slide 7 – the entire pediment depicts what happens to MedusaWest pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.The horse represents Pegasis, and another figure called ChrysaorThey were her children, birthed from her head after she was beheadedAlso, there are much tinier images on the ends – the god Zeus throwing thunder bolts on the rightOn the left, King Priam and the god AcheliusNarrative type of presentation
  • Slide 8 – difference in architecture from archaic to classical: better proportionsTemple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BCColumns do not look so pressed down – refinement of architectural design
  • Slide 9 – shows the Aphaia reconstructionDepicts were bright colors
  • Slide 10 – central images – preservedShows the goddess of Athena – temple was dedicated to Aphaia (a local goddess, and Athena)Remains of pediment sculpture showing the goddess Athena and mortal warriorsAthena – represented as a warrior figure
  • Slide 11 - Details from Temple of Aphaia pediment sculptureMost of the figures were of the same heightIn crouching positions, or positions were they are lying
  • Slide 12 - Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC (reconstruction drawing)West pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.Each pediment west and east – done in different stylesWest – earlier: archaic styleEast – later: classical style
  • Slide 13 -Aegina, warrior from west pedimentArtist wanted to show the entire figure, even if it is unnaturalAlso depicts the Archaic smileAegina, warrior from east pedimentShows face turned, more naturalistic poseBoth figures are injuredFigures meant to stand for eternity, meant to stand in for the idea of humanity for a long period of timeRole of human beings in society – goes along with the role of Philosophy – especially in the 5th century
  • This style is apparent also in vase painting - slide 14Krater from the Dipylon cemetery in Athens, Greece, ca. 740 BCVase from the early classical period, attention focused on one sceneNot ritualistic, not set up at a tomb, set up in someone’s home or palace to be appreciatedExekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in ItalyDepicts the story of Achielles and Ajax playing a dice game – figures are warriorsWarriors celebrated in Greek societyFigures are ready for battleVase painting was the most popular form of art in GreeksNot just for temples, but daily life as well
  • Slide 16 – artists would sign their painted vasesThere would be competitions as to who was the best painter
  • Transcript of "2011 survey -_archaic_greece"

    1. 1. Kore, Athens, ca. 510 BC<br />
    2. 2. Greece: Transition from Archaic to Classical periods<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. Temple of Hera I, Paestum, Italy, ca. 550 BC<br />
    5. 5. Medusa and two panthers from the west pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.<br />
    6. 6. Lamassu from DurSharrukin. 8th c. BC<br />Lion Gate at Hattusa (in modern-day Turkey), ca. 1400 BC. Built as an entrance to a Hittite citadel<br />
    7. 7. West pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.<br />
    8. 8. Temple of Hera I, Paestum, Italy, ca. 550 BC<br />Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC<br />
    9. 9. Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC, <br /> with reconstruction drawing<br />
    10. 10. Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC, <br /> with reconstruction drawing<br />Remains of pediment sculpture showing the goddess Athena and mortal warriors<br />
    11. 11. Details from Temple of Aphaiapediment sculpture<br />
    12. 12. Temple of Aphaia, Aegina, Greece, ca. 500-490 BC (reconstruction drawing)<br />West pediment of the Temple of Artemis. Corfu, Greece, ca. 600-580 BC.<br />
    13. 13. Aegina, warrior from west pediment<br />Aegina, warrior from east pediment<br />
    14. 14. Exekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy<br />Krater from the Dipylon cemetery in Athens, Greece, ca. 740 BC<br />
    15. 15. Detail, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, byExekias. Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy<br />
    16. 16. Exekias, Achilles and Ajax playing a dice game, Athenian black-figure amphora, 540-530 BC. Found in Italy<br />Euthymides, Three revelers, Athenian red-figure amphora, ca. 510 BC. Found in Italy<br />
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