Structuring arguments

269 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
269
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Structuring arguments

  1. 1. Structuring Arguments Using Toulmin Argument
  2. 2. 5 Elements of Toulmin’s Structure Claim Qualifiers Reasons / Evidence Warrants Backing
  3. 3. Claim Your claim states the argument you wish to prove.
  4. 4. When presenting an argument, your claim needs to state your main point or tell where you stand on an issue.
  5. 5. Qualifiers Qualifiers are any limits you place on your claim.
  6. 6. Examples of Qualifiers it is possible rarely few in some cases sometimes typically more or less often one might argue if it were so for the most part possibly perhaps under these conditions
  7. 7. Reason(s)/Evidence The evidence you produce demonstrates support for your claim.
  8. 8. Warrants Warrants are underlying assumptions that support your claim. They are implied, not written. Warrants can often be identified through critically reading the text.
  9. 9. “Crucial to Toulmin argument is appreciating that there must be a logical and persuasive connection between a claim and the reasons and data supporting it.” (Lunsford & Ruszkiewicz, pg. 135) This connection is the warrant.
  10. 10. Backing The evidence you provide in support of a warrants is called backing. The backing you offer shows your authority because you are able to defend the warrants that support your claim.
  11. 11. Assignment Thinking of an issue near and dear to you, write a 15 minute free write demonstrating your ability to use what you have learned about Toulmin Argument.

×