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Shared services afac_oct_11_2012_english
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Shared services afac_oct_11_2012_english
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Shared services afac_oct_11_2012_english

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SSC Architecture Framework Advisory Committee - Slide Deck

SSC Architecture Framework Advisory Committee - Slide Deck

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  • 1. Shared Services Canada Architecture Framework Advisory Committee Inaugural MeetingBenoît LongSenior Assistant Deputy MinisterTransformation, Service Strategy and DesignShared Services CanadaOctober 11, 2012 1
  • 2. Agenda Topics9:30 – 9:40 Opening Remarks and Introductions9:40 – 10:00 Information Technology Infrastructure Roundtable (ITIR) and Architecture Framework Advisory Committee (AFAC)10:00 – 10:15 Overview of Shared Services Canada10:15 – 10:30 Break10:30 – 11:00 Data Centre Consolidation11:00 – 11:30 Telecommunications Transformation11:30 – 12:00 Enterprise Architecture12:00 – 12:30 AFAC Workplan and Next Meeting 2
  • 3. IT Infrastructure Roundtable and Advisory Committees 3
  • 4. AFAC: Objectives and Terms of ReferenceMandate:• Serves as a public-private sector consultative forum on enterprise architecture in support of SSC’s transformation initiatives;• Explores, weighs options and makes recommendations through SSC on all aspects of enterprise architecture as it relates to SSC’s transformation initiatives – in particular, email, data centre and networks/telecom;• Supports the advancement of SSC’s transformation agenda consistent with Government of Canada priorities;• May establish sub-working groups as required to address specific issues; and,• Addresses and responds to issues or recommendations provided by the ITIR.Membership:• ICT industry representation, federal representation (Chief Information Officers (CIO) from other government departments, SSC).Meetings and Agenda:• Frequency of meetings, agenda. 4
  • 5. IT Infrastructure Roundtable - Forward Agenda Fall Winter (November) (February – March) • Transformation Journey •Strategic Sourcing and Best Practices • Plan-to-Plan Core Themes o Data Centres • Review of Plan-to-Plan o Telecommunications o Data Centres o Telecommunications • Procurement Benchmarks Updates • To be confirmed (as required) Advisory Committee 5
  • 6. AFAC Forward Agenda Oct 2012 Nov Dec 2013 Feb Mar Apr May 2013 2012 2013 2013 2013Transformation X XOverviewDCC and Constraints, Dependencies, andTelecom P2P X XArchitectural RisksFramework P2P X X X X X X XIdentity,Credential and Finalize X XAccess for ITIRManagement*Cloud Finalize for X X XComputing* ITIRConvergedCommunications X X(Voice, Video,Data)*Assumptions: * only for discussion purposes; Advisory committee meets every 4-6 weeks and has core group of membersfrom ICT industry and SSC. Advisory committee would have minimum of two meetings to develop product for consideration byIT Infrastructure Roundtable and one meeting to finalize product before presentation to IT Infrastructure Roundtable. 6
  • 7. Review of Initial Deliverables• Framework – Corporate Executive Board – enterprise architecture program• Annual Report and Plans/Progress• SSC architectural documents/artifacts and interim operating standards• Others? 7
  • 8. AFAC Rules of Engagement• Members are expected to freely share their ideas and opinion (aim is to leverage participants knowledge and experience)• No idea is a bad idea• Members of the committee have been asked to participate because of their expertise, not their company or association affiliations – leave corporate and affiliations at the door!• Recommendations should be standards-centric (i.e. not product-centric). 8
  • 9. A New Organization with an IT FocusBudget 2011 Standardize Consolidate Re-engineer Shared Services Canada:  Created on August 4, 2011 Mandated to deliver email, data centre and network/telecom services to 43 Government of Canada institutions representing 95% of the federal IT infrastructure spending  Budgets, people, assets and contracts transferred to SSC in November 2011  Full accountability for the infrastructure on April 1, 2012  Shared Services Canada Act, Royal Assent, June 29, 2012 Raison d’être  Reduce costs  Improve Security  Maximize Efficiencies  Minimize Risks 9
  • 10. Enterprise Approach To TransformationOPERATIONS TRANSFORMATION Data CentresBusiness Continuity • Harvest efficiencies from consolidationFrameworks • Reduce number of data centres from 300 to less than 20Establishment of Networks • Transition from department-centric to shared networkorganizational infrastructurestructure • Converge voice data and video onto the same network infrastructure • Expand wireless network infrastructure for mobile devicesData collection/validation of people, Emailprojects and assets to • Move to one single email platform for the Government of Canada (unclassified – secret)establish baselineSSC created: Stand alonetransfer of Department1,500+ PWGSCemployees Transfer of 5,000+ SSC legislation employees from 42 receives Royal departments Assent August 4, 2011 November 15, 2011 April 1, 2012 June 29, 2012 2015 2020 10
  • 11. Current State of IT across Government of CanadaHighly complex, costly and Mission-critical programs highly Issues persist and are barriers less secure than desired dependent on infrastructure to government priorities 63 email systems  2,100 mission-critical, mandate- Current state of IT 19 large data centres specific systems that span: infrastructure: 65 Medium-sized data  key benefits programs (e.g.  is complex, old andcentres of varying quality, employment and pension benefits) expensivesecurity and energy  security (e.g. national defence and  is a long-term unfundedefficiency; national policing systems and liability hundreds of smaller provincial police force databases,  is vulnerable to availability“closets”; CBSA border systems, and Public and performance issues 50 wide area networks Safety cyber security and  is a barrier to businessconnecting over 3000 Emergency Response); system renewal, modernizationbuildings and data centres –  safety and health (e.g. food and agilityover 1,000 firewalls; monitoring, health science labs,  has uneven quality of service less than 100 buildings with weather systems, seismic systems);  has some resiliency softwireless WAN services;  farmers and students (agriculture spots over 110,000 people with 2 innovation, student loan programs)  is not service orientedphones;  finance systems (e.g federal- over 1000 PBX and key provincial tax and benefit systems,  Procurement practices thatsystems; money laundering) limit innovation. largely in-sourced  connectivity that ensures safe access to government, programs, citizens and protects information 11
  • 12. Data Centre and Networks - Current State Building Building Building Building LAN2 – LAN2 – Dept. F: Dept. C: Dept B Dept B small data small data LAN3 – centre centre Dept. A: Dept F small data LAN4 – LAN6 LAN2999 centre Dept H LAN1 – Dept A LAN5 – Dept Q LAN7 ... LAN3000 WAN1 WAN2 WAN3 ... WAN43 Dept. H: LAN6 LAN6 Dept. D: Dept. A: large. data centre small data small data centre. Dept. Q: Dept. B: centre small data small data LAN4 – centre centre LAN6 Dept H LAN5 – LAN7 LAN7 LAN7 Dept Q Building Building Building Building ... Building data centres 12
  • 13. Conceptual End State – Simpler, Safer and Smarter 13
  • 14. Data Centre Consolidation Renewed, Reliable, ResilientPeter LittlefieldDirector General, Data Centre Consolidation InitiativeShared Services CanadaOctober 11, 2012 14
  • 15. Data Centre Consolidation: Transformation Principles The Government of Canada will consolidate data centres, centralize their administration, and rationalize service delivery, to achieve greater VALUE efficiencies, reduce costs, minimize risks, and improve service quality Improve Service Quality Maximize Efficiencies Improve levels of service and security for all Reduce infrastructure and overall costs•• VISION Modernize infrastructure and platforms • • Standardize infrastructure and operations• Increase system availability, reliability, • Determine appropriate level of private sector robustness and scalability engagement• Reduce dependence on physical location • Make most effective use of IT labour force Minimize Risks Additional Benefits• Fewer, better quality facilities • Significant environmental benefits• Power supply diversification • Reduce power demand • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions• Centralize planning and recapitalization (cleaner power); reduce e-waste• Address aging IT infrastructure • Economic stimulation• Examine industry investment and risk sharing • Innovation (workforce, technology, service) 15
  • 16. GC Data Centres: Where Are We Now?By the numbers:• Over 300 GC data centres NCR: 128  Total of > 600,000 sq.ft.  19 data centres ≥ 5,000 sq.ft.  65 data centres 1,000 – 5,000 sq.ft.  Over 2,000 more server locations• Over 25,000 servers Western & Northern: 81  35% virtual; 65% physical Québec: 40  7% Unix; 14% Linux; 79% Windows Ontario: Atlantic: 31 28• Nearly 50,000 MIPS• Over 14 PB of on-line storage (54% utilized)Challenge:• Work together: 43 organizations to 1• Manage demand and capacity horizontally• Optimize SSC’s people, processes, and technology• Greening of government operations – efficient use of clean power• Secure GC data, infrastructure, networks, and facilities 16
  • 17. Data Centre Vision: From – To Perspective For Illustration Purposes Only Key Components Elements FROM (TBC) TO (TBC) Number of Data Centres 300+ < 20 Enterprise focus; Facilities Geographic location Dept. based objective criteria Footprint > 600,000 sq.ft. < 200,000 sq. ft. Number of Servers 25,000+ < 18,000 Hardware Type of computing and storage Specialized Standardized Middleware Non standard Standardized platforms Software Virtualization Ratio (virtual: physical) Low (35:65) High (70:30) Common high speed Network Consolidation Dept. specific WAN/LANs and secure network Power Density (Watts per square foot) 35 W/sq. ft. 100 W/sq. f t. (min.) Power & Cooling Total Power (Mega Watts) 17.8 MW 13.4 MW Resiliency Availability and disaster recovery Tier 0-2 Tiers 3-4Optimize the delivery of GC data centre services, by standardizing technologies, consolidating buildings and IT, centralizing operations, and re-engineering service delivery 17
  • 18. DCC MethodologyStep 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5:Current State Requirements End State Plan Execute• Inventory of • Partners’ business • Target architecture • Gap analysis between current and • Project execution in facilities and needs and for future state data future several waves of infrastructure technology centres and small projects • How to migrate from current to end• Applications to directions infrastructure state • Dynamic plan infrastructure map • Policy impacts • Organization to adjustment • Costs and benefits analysis• Service levels for all • Key enterprise provide future state data centre services • Sourcing approach • On-going programs and requirements adjustment of applications • Core skills and • Impacts to people and culture • Partners as agents strategies and plans, industry options • Risks and mitigations as needed• Knowledge and of change and experience from relationships • Detailed project and migration • Active partner industry and other plans engagement government • Procurement of goods and/or • Benefit tracking jurisdictions services • Frequent • Infrastructure plan alignment with recognition of partner business cycles and plans successes • Business Cases to support initiatives Inventory  Requirements  Target Architecture  Consolidation Plan  Progress Reports Application Map Analysis  Target Organization  HR Mgmt. Plan  Benefits Reports Case Studies, Industry  Engagement Strategy  Service Delivery Model  Change Mgmt. Plan Trends  Migration, HR, Sourcing Strategies  Business Cases 18
  • 19. Data Centre Consolidation Strategies Reduce Standardize • Duplicative infrastructure • Diverse infrastructure • Unused capacity • Service levels • Time to delivery • Service delivery • Environmental footprint • Business intake • Costs Modernize Commoditize • Data centre facilities • Infrastructure as a service • Aging infrastructure • Storage • Workplace tools • Compute • Core competencies / skills • Platform as a service Key Driver: Capital refresh lifecycle 19
  • 20. Criteria for the Selection of Data Centres• SSC envisions the establishment of a few principal data centres (e.g. < 20) o Based on industry best practices and case studies of organizations and jurisdictions who have conducted data centre consolidation initiatives, of comparable size and complexity.• SSC is analyzing the many options available for the Potential Criteria establishment of data centres, for example: • Geographical and geological factors o Use of existing Crown real property assets • Proximity to existing o Construction of new facilities telecommunications network hubs • Proximity to power utilities o Partnership with other jurisdictions • Security assurance o Private sector arrangements • Business continuity• Scientific and objective criteria – economic, • Proximity to Canadian users, vendor support and a sustainable workforce demographic, environmental and technological • Environmental footprint factors – will be examined during the selection • Cost (e.g. build, property, power) process.• SSC has launched an independent third-party study to determine objective location selection criteria by October 31, 2012.• Locations should be determined by the Spring of 2013. 20
  • 21. Data Centre Conceptual End State (detail) 21
  • 22. Data Centre Consolidation Principles1. As few data centres as possible2. Locations determined objectively for the long term3. Several levels of resiliency and availability (establish in pairs)4. Scalable and flexible infrastructure5. Infrastructure transformed; not ‘’fork-lifted’’ from old to new6. Separate application development environment7. Standard platforms which meet common requirements (no re-architecting of applications)8. Build in security from the beginningEnd State: Security1. All departments share one Operational Zone2. Domains and Zones where required3. Classified information below Top Secret4. Balance security and consolidation5. Consolidated, controlled, secure perimeters6. Certified and Accredited infrastructure 22
  • 23. Data Centre Consolidation Principle Cont’dEnd State: Data Centre Service Management1. ITIL ITSM Framework2. Standardized Service Levels/Availability Levels3. Inclusive of Scientific and special purpose computing4. Standardized Application and Infrastructure Lifecycle Management5. Smart Evergreening6. Full redundancy – within data centres, between pairs, across sitesEnd State: Business Intent1. Business to Government2. Government to Government3. Citizens to Government 23
  • 24. Current Activities and Next Steps• Complete current state inventory and analysis (Dec. 2012)• Engage with Partner departments to produce business requirements (Dec. 2012/Jan. 2013)• Industry Day(s) and formal engagement (early 2013)• End State Definition (Mar. 2013) 24
  • 25. Data Centres – Critical Success Factors People • ... • ... • ... Process • ... • ... • ... Technology • ... • ... • ... 25
  • 26. Telecommunications Transformation ProgramMichel FortinDirector General, Telecommunications Transformation InitiativeShared Services CanadaOctober 11, 2012 26
  • 27. Telecommunications Transformation Principles The Government of Canada will consolidate networks and transformtelecommunications services, to achieve greater efficiencies, reduce costs, VALUE minimize risks, and improve security and service quality Improving Service Quality Maximizing Efficiencies Improve levels of service to citizens and public Consolidate and converge to reduce• servantsVISION • duplication of infrastructure• Standardize infrastructure and platforms • Centralize operation and administration• Increase system availability and robustness by • Determine appropriate level of private sector improving redundancy and route diversification engagement• Implement ubiquitous personal mobility • Make effective use of shrinking IT budget Minimizing Risks Additional Benefits• Increase information security • Enable Workplace 2.0• Centralize planning and procurement • Reduce travel costs (videoconferencing)• Consolidated access points to the Internet • Improve support to remote worker• Rejuvenate aging IT infrastructure • Significant environmental benefits 27
  • 28. Current State – Analysis• Canada Canadians population distribution population = 33.4M Legend Population• 13 largest ciities Orange– population >1,000 (metro areas) total Blue – population < =1000 population > 18M• Canada has 230 cities with a population of > 15,000• Important to factor in population distribution in network architecture to provide best service to citizen 28
  • 29. Geographical Distribution of Federal Employees GC employee distribution by province + NCR• Total of approximately Saskatachewan Yukon International 255,000 public 2.5% 0.2% 0.6% servants (excluding Alberta military members of Prince Edward 5.6% Island Quebec British the Canadian Forces Columbia 1.3% 11.8% and RCMP officers) 9.3% Manitoba 3.8%• Over two thirds of public servant employees are Ontario located in Ontario and 14.6% Quebec Nunavut 0.1% NCR Nova Scotia 40.6% 4.4% New Foundland 1.8% Northwest New Territories Brunswick 0.3% 3.2% 29
  • 30. Geographical Distribution of Federal employees• GC employees are GC employee population distribution Zone 4 Zone 5 located in ~1400 1% cities/towns in Zone 3 12% Canada 3% Zone 2 Legend 10% Population Zone 1 Zone 1 – pop. >350,000• 74% of GC Zone 2 – pop. 50K-350K employees are 74% Zone 3 – pop. 10K-50K located in Zone 1 Zone 4 – pop. < 10,000 (population of Zone 5 - Nunavut, 350,000+ with NWT, Yukon suburbs). These GC location distribution represent only 9% of Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 3% 9% the total # of locations 5% Zone 3 2%• 80%+ of GC locations are small towns Two populations: (<10,000 population) Zone 4 Canadians and (Zone 4, 5) 81% Public Servants 30
  • 31. Current State (from a number’s perspective) Networks:  50 Wide Area Networks serving 43 depts  ~8000 WAN access to ~ 4000 buildings Telephony:  300,000+ CENTREX telephone lines  850 + PBXs or Key Telephone Systems  120,000+ Blackberries, cell phones, wireless modems  15,000+ Toll Free Lines Videoconferencing  2800+ Boardroom Systems  82 VC bridges Contact Centre  100+ contact centres of various sizes  12000 + contact centre agent seats Must transform to provide best value and better service to Canadians ! 31
  • 32. Telecom Vision: From – To Perspective For Illustration Purposes OnlyKey Components Elements FROM (TBC) TO (TBC) Number of Wide Area Networks 50 1 (intended)Inter-buildingNetworks Number of WAN connections to 7000+ -20% buildings Number of multi-tenant buildings <40 >300Intra-building with consolidated infrastructureNetworks Number of buildings with Wireless < 100 >3000 LAN services Number of PBXs and key systems 850 + <100Telephony Number of IP phones deployed < 10,000 >150,000Videoconferencing Number of VC bridges 82 < 12 Number of contact centresContact Centres 100+ -50%+ (infrastructure) Modernize and optimize the delivery of GC networks, by standardizingtechnologies, consolidating buildings and IT, centralizing operations, and re-engineering service delivery 32
  • 33. Conceptual Telecom/Networks End-State 33
  • 34. Conceptual End State (detail) 34
  • 35. Conceptual End-State Continued Consolidation principles • As few wide area networks as possible • All departments share network access in multi-tenant buildings • Network equipment is shared • Telecom hubs (call managers, VC bridges) located in enterprise data centers or common points of presence • Inter-data center connections should be diverse and fully redundant • Scalable and flexible infrastructure • Performance levels should be similar wherever possible • Contracts/services will be consolidated Security principles • All departments share one enterprise/common zone • Access to sensitive departmental data is secured through restricted zones • Developers do not have access to production infrastructure • Classified information below Top Secret • Consolidated, controlled, secure perimeters • Balance security and consolidation • Certified and Accredited infrastructure 35
  • 36. Conceptual End-State Continued Transformation Areas 1. Inter and Intra-data center networks 2. Inter-building wide area networks 3. Intra-building (Local Area Networks) includes mobile services 4. Converged (Voice, Video , Data) / Unified Communications 5. Contact Centres (internal and external) 6. Network Security 7. Internet connectivity (including IPv6 support) Characteristics • Integrated (single, common, secure GC network will link all service delivery points) • High performance • Secure • Cost-effective • Standardized (based on open standards, modularized design) • Mobile (wireless technology will be maximized where cost-effective) • Responsive and resilient 36
  • 37. Current Activities and Next Steps• Complete current state inventory and analysis (Oct 2012)• Engage with stakeholders to produce business requirements (December 2012/January 2013)• Industry Day(s) and formal engagement (early 2013)• End State Definition (March 2013) 37
  • 38. Networks – Critical Success Factors People • ... • ... • ... Process • ... • ... • ... Technology • ... • ... • ... 38
  • 39. Enterprise Architecture ProgramJirka DanekDirector General, Enterprise ArchitectureShared Services CanadaOctober 11, 2012 39
  • 40. Enterprise ICT Architecture 40
  • 41. Draft Architecture Documents Schedule Available today Q3 2012-2013 • Distributed computing • Telecommunications ♦ GC SRA RIA* ♦ GCNET Intra-Building RA • Telecommunications ♦ GCNET Inter-Building RA ♦ Wireless LAN RA** ♦ GCNET Data Center ♦ Wireless LAN RIA Network RA ♦ VoIP RA ♦ UC RA • IT Security  Distributed computing ♦ Security Domains and ♦ Directory RA Zone Architecture ♦ Mail Service Strategy ♦ Security Domains and Zones Implementation Guidelines ♦ Management Zone Implementation Guidelines * RIA – Reference Implementation Architecture **RA – Reference Architecture 41
  • 42. Draft Architecture Documents Schedule Cont’dQ4 2012-2013 TBD  Distributed computing  Telecommunication ♦ VDI Platform RA ♦ Contact Center RA ♦ Collaboration RA  IT Security  Production computing ♦ IT Environment Protection ♦ ERP Platform RA ♦ Identification, Authentication, ♦ Common Infrastructure Authorization Service RA ♦ Secure Communications ♦ Storage Services RA ♦ Perimeter Defence, ♦ Data Protection/Backup Detection, Response, Services RA Recovery, Audit ♦ Data Archival Services RA ♦ Data Centre Facilities Management RA ♦ IT Service Management RA ♦ High Availability and Disaster Recovery RA ♦ Data Centre Services Interoperability RA  Telecommunication ♦ Videoconferencing RA 42
  • 43. Enterprise Architecture EC Framework Core Enterprise Architecture ActivitiesEXECUTIVE SUMMARY I RECOMMENDED RESOURCES I DETAILED FINDINGS I APPENDIX© 2011 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. 43
  • 44. AFAC Next Meeting 44
  • 45. Next Meeting of AFAC• Receive and integrate feedback into Transformation Program presentation for IT Infrastructure Roundtable meeting that is being planned for November 2012.• Timing for meeting #2 for Architecture Framework Advisory Committee. 45

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