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Shared Services Canada Data Centre Consolidation - Platform and Infrastructure Services

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Dcc ied presentations_july_17_2013_-_en

  1. 1. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Platform & Infrastructure Services Industry E tEngagement Day July 17, 2013 1
  2. 2. Industry Engagement Day: Key Messages “Engaging with others outside our institution—other levels of government, industry, academia, non-governmental organizations, and individual citizens—is also essential to our work. These diverse partners can help to identify and implement practical, effective solutions that get results. We need to develop our policies, programs and services with people, not just for them.” Source: Twentieth Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada • The strategic outcomes for Shared Services Canada (SSC) are to generate savings, increase security, and improve service • Strategies to achieve these outcomes include consolidation, standardization, and transformation, including development of sourcing strategies and incorporating security by design strategies • With regard to sourcing strategies, SSC Transformation will engage industry to explore options to implement these strategies and achieve its desired outcomes 2
  3. 3. Industry Engagement Day: Objectives • Share plans with industry suppliers and engage in a dialogue regarding Data Centre Platform and Infrastructure services and Service Delivery OptionsInfrastructure services and Service Delivery Options • Explain the proposed “Collaborative Procurement Solutions” approachSolutions approach • Address Supply Chain Cyber Security ThreatsSecurity Threats • Elicit feedback from industry on S i D li Hi h A il bilitService Delivery, High Availability, Contract Period and Pricing Options 3 g p
  4. 4. Industry Engagement Day: Agenda TIME SPEAKER DESCRIPTION 09:45 ‐ 09:50  TBD MC Opening Remarks &  Objectives Benoît Long09:50 – 10:15 Benoît Long SADM, Transformation, Service Strategy & Design, SSC  SSC Transformation Overview  10:15 – 10:45 Peter Littlefield DG, Data Centre Consolidation Program, SSC Data Centre Platforms &  Infrastructure Overview 10:45 ‐ 11:00 Break 11:00 ‐ 11:30 Stéphane Richard Senior Director, Information Technology Procurement, SSC  Collaborative Procurement  Solutions Approach  Patrick Mountford 11:30 – 12:30 Director, Cyber Security Strategy, Cyber and  IT Security  Transformation Program, SSC Carey Frey  Director, IT Security Strategic Relationships Office,  Communications Security Establishment Canada Supply Chain Integrity  Communications Security Establishment Canada 12:30 – 12:45 TBD and Speakers MC Questions and Answers  12:45 – 13:00 Peter Littlefield DG, Data Centre Consolidation Program, SSC Recap / Closing Remarks 4 DG, Data Centre Consolidation Program, SSC 
  5. 5. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Transformation Overview Benoît Long Senior Assistant Deputy Ministerp y Transformation, Service Strategy and Design Shared Services Canada July 17, 2013 5
  6. 6. SSC Background / Context 2011 Budget A New Organization with an IT Raison d’être  Reduce costs  Improve Security Focus STANDARDIZE  Maximize Efficiencies  Minimize Risks CONSOLIDATE RE-ENGINEER 6
  7. 7. The Government of Canada will consolidate data centres and networks transform Strategic Vision and Principles The Government of Canada will consolidate data centres and networks, transform telecommunications services, centralize their administration, and rationalize service delivery to achieve greater efficiencies, reduce costs, minimize risks, and improve security and service quality IMPROVE SERVICE QUALITY MAXIMIZE EFFICIENCIES • Improve levels of service and security for all • Modernize infrastructure and platforms • Increase system availability reliability • Consolidate and converge to reduce duplication of infrastructure • Standardize infrastructure and operations IMPROVE SERVICE QUALITY MAXIMIZE EFFICIENCIES • Increase system availability, reliability, robustness and scalability • Reduce dependence on physical location • Implement ubiquitous personal mobility Standardize infrastructure and operations • Determine appropriate level of private sector engagement • Make effective use of shrinking IT labour force • Fewer, better quality facilities mobility • Significant environmental benefits labour force MINIMIZE RISKS SSC ADDITIONAL BENEFITS • Increase information security • Power supply diversification • Centralize planning and recapitalization • Address aging IT infrastructure g – Reduce power demand – Reduce greenhouse gas emissions (cleaner power); reduce e-waste • Enable Workplace 2.0 7 • Address aging IT infrastructure • Examine industry investment and risk sharing • Reduce travel costs (videoconferencing)
  8. 8. Transformation Objectives SAVINGS SECURITYSERVICE Transformation will  match service levels  to partner and GC  i iti Transformation will  realize material cost  savings and avoid  future costs Transformation will  provision a secure  environment to meet  d 8 priorities. future costs. program needs.
  9. 9. EMAIL SSC’s Transformation Initiatives Nov 2011 Jan – May 2012 June 2013 Oct 2013 – April 2015 EMAIL DATA CENTRES 2012-2013 2013-2020 TELECOMMUNICATIONS 2012-2013 2013-2020 Forums / Events • Chief Information Officer Council (CIOC), CIO Forum • DPI, GTEC • Executive Summit Key Stakeholders • Ministers • Inter‐departmental Advisory  Committees (IT Business  Transformation) gement Inter‐departmental Working Groups: • Security  • Policy and Standards • Functional • Business Requirements 9 • Heads of IT meetings Industry – Launch and closure of procurement process;  engagement of industry based on sourcing strategies  Transformation) • CIO Council • 43 Partner organizations • Unions • Industry Engag • Business Requirements • Transition • Operational & Service Mgmt • Information Mgmt
  10. 10. Current State of Data Centres and Networks LAN2 – D t B Building Building Building Building LAN2 – Dept F: small 485 data centres Dept. F: small LAN1 – Dept. A LAN5 – Dept. Q LAN4 – Dept H LAN3 – Dept. F Dept. B LAN7 LAN6 LAN4 000 Dept. A: small data centre Dept. B Dept. F: small data centre LAN3 999 Dept. F: small data centre WAN1 WAN2 WAN 50WAN3 50 wide area networks (WAN) LAN4 – LAN6 LAN Dept. A: large data centre Dept. H: small data centre. Dept. Q: small data centre LAN6 Dept. B: small data centre Dept. D: small data centre LAN5 – Dept. Q Dept. H LAN7 Building Building Building LAN7 LAN6 Building LAN7 Building 4 000+ local area networks (LAN) 10
  11. 11. Data Centre Vision: From – To Perspective Key Elements FROM TO (TBC)Key Components Elements FROM TO (TBC) Number of Data Centres • 5 Tier 3 • 3 Tier 2 • 136 Tier 1 • 3060 Non tier • 395 small (100 - 999 sq. ft.) • 68 medium (1000 - 4999 sq. ft.) • 22 large (> 5000 sq. ft.) • Additional 2 718 locations with servers < 10 Tier 3 Facilities • 3060 Non-tier • Additional 2,718 locations with servers Power Density • 30 W/sq. ft. > 100 W/sq. ft Footprint • 591 000 sq. ft. IT Space • 123 000 sq. ft. M&E < 180,000 sq. ft. 123 000 sq. ft. M&E Servers • 63,754 total servers: 23,424 physical, 40,220 virtual • Includes 1,860 non-standard systems • 73% virtualized (Wintel); 53% virtualized (Lintel); 59% virtualized (Unix) • < 40,000 • > 70% virtualized IT Infrastructure Computing Platforms • 30% of servers older than 5 years • Processor architecture distribution is 95% x86 and 5% RISC • 71% Windows, 15% Linux, 6% Hypervisor, 5% Unix, 3% other legacy OS Standardized on few platforms: • Wintel high and std. availability (HA & SA) • Lintel (HA, SA) • z/OS (HA SA)• z/OS (HA, SA) • High-performance computing Mainframe • IBM z/OS + z/Linux = 16+5 DR; 146 LPAR; 73,000 MIPS • Unisys MCP = 5+1 DR; 10 LPAR and 10,000 MIPS Storage • Volumes : 36 PB SAN/NAS, 130 PB off-line; 34 PB direct- attached storage in Midrange V i t i id k SAN d NAS • SAN/NAS, consolidated and standardized 11 Storage • Various enterprise, midrange, workgroup SANs and NASs (HDS 26%, IBM 23%, EMC 18%, HP 14%, NetApp 9%) • 30% organic growth per year
  12. 12. Cyber Threats Target End State Target end state:Target end state: Allies (+International) T t d t tT t d t t Target end state: Streamlined networks • Connecting 377 000 public servants to each other and to Canadians • Linking 3 580 GC- i d b ildi Target end state: Streamlined networks • Connecting 377 000 public servants to each other and to Canadians • Linking 3 580 GC- i d b ildi Internet Businesses Canadians Virtual  Private  Cloud ( International) Target end state: Less than 10 data centres • Established in pairs for redundancy • Mostly private sector- owned Target end state: Less than 10 data centres • Established in pairs for redundancy • Mostly private sector- owned occupied buildings Key components include: • Single enterprise-wide network with enhanced capacity and robustness occupied buildings Key components include: • Single enterprise-wide network with enhanced capacity and robustness GC Network Regional and International Carriers (377 000 users; 3,580  buildings) Public Servants Businesses Governments• Most outside of the National Capital Region First pair: Development data centres • GC-owned Macdonald- C ti i Ott • Most outside of the National Capital Region First pair: Development data centres • GC-owned Macdonald- C ti i Ott • Ultra high-speed, no fail connectivity between data centres • Greater, more secure Internet connectivity • Streamlined and i l l • Ultra high-speed, no fail connectivity between data centres • Greater, more secure Internet connectivity • Streamlined and i l l GC Offices B i C i i Production X Production Y  Cartier in Ottawa • Bell Canada in Gatineau Second pair: First set of production data centres • GC-owned facility on the Canadian Forces Base Cartier in Ottawa • Bell Canada in Gatineau Second pair: First set of production data centres • GC-owned facility on the Canadian Forces Base prise Security wireless telecom infrastructure inside buildings • Voice services (VoIP) (wired and wireless) • More desktop id f i wireless telecom infrastructure inside buildings • Voice services (VoIP) (wired and wireless) • More desktop id f i Sensitive Data Enclaves Business ContinuityCanadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden • Site located within 100 km of Borden Next pair(s): Next set of production data centres Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden • Site located within 100 km of Borden Next pair(s): Next set of production data centres Enhanced Enterp videoconferencing services • Contact Centre Infrastructure Services • Enhanced security through consolidated it i d videoconferencing services • Contact Centre Infrastructure Services • Enhanced security through consolidated it i d Development Supercomputer • If required (to be confirmed) • Located outside of NCR and ON Specialized supercomputing facility • If required (to be confirmed) • Located outside of NCR and ON Specialized supercomputing facility 12 security services and increased perimeter security security services and increased perimeter security p p g yp p g y
  13. 13. Phased Implementation • SSC will implement the Data Centre and Telecommunications Transformation Plan in three phases. Ph 1 (2013 2014) Ph 2 (2014 2015) Phase 3 (2015 2017): By 2020:Phase 1 (2013–2014): Foundational infrastructure • First development pair Phase 2 (2014–2015): Services sourcing Phase 3 (2015–2017): Final data centre infrastructure By 2020: Full Implementation • Procure data • Final pair(s) of • Complete the• First development pair of data centres • First production pair of data centres • Contract(s) for • Procure data centre and network services • Final pair(s) of production data centres (if/as required) • Complete the migration and close the last legacy data centre ( ) enterprise network Migration (2013–2020): Migrate applications to the new data centres and GC-occupied buildings to the new network and close legacy data centres • Full consolidation of data centres and networks will take seven years to complete. • Savings, security enhancements and service improvements will be realized from the outset. the new network, and close legacy data centres 13 Savings, security enhancements and service improvements will be realized from the outset.
  14. 14. Dec. 2013Mar. 2014 20202016 2018Sep.2012 Mar.  Sep. Transformation Timeline Step 1: CurrentState Step 2: SSC is following a proven methodology for  transforming IT infrastructure q Step 2: Requirements Step 3: End State Step 4: Plan & Procure Step 5: E t Manageable Projects Detailed Plans Execute Wave 1 (…) Step 5: Execute Wave 2 (…) Step 5: Execute Wave 3 14 Program Management: Project Management, Reporting, Communications, Governance, Stakeholder Engagement, Finance (…)
  15. 15. • Produce detailed Current State |asset & Transformation Phased Approach P d R f A hit t Produce detailed Current State |asset &  application information   • Develop detailed Partner req’mts. – Business cycles – Application refresh plans – Overall readiness approach • Define Consolidation  • Produce Reference Architecture • Establish Core Services roadmap • Develop “Migration Factory” Overall readiness • Develop Consolidation  Priority List (CPL) Sequence – Competing factors • Determine sourcing  strategies • Develop Security by • Establish enterprise  Data centres  & GCNet • Build new Operations • Define org. structure • Define migration & • Conduct Procurement  (incl. P3, etc.) • Develop Security by  design • Build new Operations  organization • Establish all ITSM tools &   processes • Build migration and  • Define migration &  receiving teams • Develop HR Mgmt & Talent  Plans • Projectize by priority / CPL  Core Services in Place DNS ADICAM IP ITSM DHCP receiving teams • Install & configure new infra. • Perform Quality Control • Assist Partners in the migration of all  business applications • Identify application inter‐ dependencies &  infrastructure reqmts • Align network consolidation plan with  data centre & application migration 15 business applications  • Close (“shred”) data centres as they are vacated data centre & application migration  reqmts TTP: Building DCC:  Server UNIT OF TRANSFORMATION WORK:
  16. 16. Application-Centric Approach To Planning/Execution Building Data Centres • Overall planning and execution framework is based on an Floor BuildingCentres Partners is based on an application-centric approach Partners Servers • Project for each server or suite of servers (1,000’s)( , ) • 14,020 applications on 63,644 servers in Application 485 data centres and 2,718 other locations 16
  17. 17. Overall Transformation Approach Architecture Applications (App.)Facilities Security Storage Platforms Foundational Elements Deploy Servers Data Centres Supply Chain for Servers and StorageNetworks (WAN, LAN) Deploy – Servers 9. App. Port Acceptance Pl Procurement 10. Remove / Dispose of 5 Mi ti Pl d T t d A h 6. Configure Destination Environment 7. Schedule With App. Teams 8. Test, Test and Test! Plan Project Smart 2. Facilities 3. Current State Asset Inventory 4. Applications – Inventory, Detailed Business Plans 5. Migration Plan and Targeted Approach 1. Server – Documentation and Dependencies Sequencing 17
  18. 18. Overall Transformation Approach (cont’d)   Prod1 & 2  Dev1 Dev1– use existing Simple   Dev1 use existing Bell contract Update Prod1 (P3); new space contract for Prod2 Moderate  Wave 1 Migration; multiple bus routes Upgrade Dev2 Wave 2 – Into full P d1 d P d2 Complex Dev2 Prod3 & 4   Prod1 and Prod2 Prod3 and Prod4 Wave 3 Migration to all Prod DCs, particularly Prod3 Bus routes will exist for different types of servers; multiple lines of transformation (as in manufacturing) will provide partners particularly Prod3, Prod4 18 Bus routes will exist for different types of servers; multiple lines of transformation (as in manufacturing) will provide partners with multiple options to migrate their applications; after two - three stops, applications MUST be moved, even if moved to temporary Quarantine Zones (QZs)
  19. 19. Business Requirements • Support a wide variety of federal government programs and• Support a wide variety of federal government programs and applications ranging from corporate file stores and routine data exchanges, to real-time government-wide mission-critical military, policy, health and public safety informationhealth and public safety information • Enterprise infrastructure and service management to eliminate silos and facilitate interoperability across departments and agencies • Reduce duplication and inefficiencies • Ensure high availability for mission critical applications • Standardize service levels to ensure a consistent delivery and availability of Data Centre services across all SSC partners and agencies • Minimize cost to manage service • Security: Supply must meet the Trusted Supply Chain Requirements ( identified in the “Supply Chain Integrity” presentation to follow) 19 ( identified in the Supply Chain Integrity presentation to follow)
  20. 20. Functional Requirements  Supplier diversity (primary/alternate and/or multiple primary)pp y (p y p p y)  Built-in, on-going competition to ensure best value, continuous improvement and innovation  Open standards to allow for workload mobility / portability across suppliers Open standards to allow for workload mobility / portability across suppliers  Certified compliance and compatibility with SSC reference architectures  Maximum pre-configuration and integration pre-delivery  No “Shopping list” / “retail” procurement vehicles  Innovative financing and commercial terms J t I Ti it Just-In-Time capacity  Self-service / self-provisioning  Frequent market checks to take advantageFrequent market checks to take advantage of technology, economic or market shifts  Provisions for annual price competition to ensure best value to Canada 20 best a ue to Ca ada  Secure multi-tenant environment (GC Domains & Zones)
  21. 21. Procurement Timeline to Contract Award Industry Day & 1-on-1s Post RFIs and RFREs Close RFP Contract Award SOLICITATION INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT Jul 17-26 RFRE October REVIEW/REFINE December Post RFP 2013 2014 March Apr - May RFP Evaluation June 2014 IMPLEMENTATION 2014‐ RFIS Aug - Sep February • The Collaborative Procurement process (identified above) will be explained SOLICITATION RFRE & RFP DEVELOPMENT RFRE REQUIREMENTS (RRR) RFIS The Collaborative Procurement process (identified above) will be explained further in the following “Collaborative Procurement Solutions Approach” presentation • Supply Chain Integrity (SCI) verification will be conducted during the RRR• Supply Chain Integrity (SCI) verification will be conducted during the RRR to ensure all IT Products meet Canada’s security and supply chain standards; more detail will be provided in the following “Supply Chain Integrity” presentation 21 Integrity presentation
  22. 22. Stakeholder Engagement: IT Infrastructure Roundtable 22
  23. 23. Stakeholder Engagement - AFAC Architecture Framework Advisory Committee (AFAC) was launched in October 2012Architecture Framework Advisory Committee (AFAC) was launched in October 2012 and includes a core group of members from ICT Industry and SSC ICAM Cloud  Computing/ Converged  Communications  Transformation  Overview Computing/ Platforms Oct. 11,  2012 Launch of  AFAC Architecture Framework Advisory Committee (AFAC) 23 AFAC
  24. 24. SSC Transformation Overview: Recap & Questions Questions?Questions? (for Suppliers only) 24
  25. 25. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Data Centre Platforms & Infrastructure Peter Littlefield Director General, Data Centre Consolidation Shared Services Canada July 17, 2013 25
  26. 26. Goal and Objectives • Goal of Data Centre Services:  Standardise and consolidate the GC’s IT infrastructure and platforms while meeting SSC Partners’ common service requirements • Today’s Objectives:  To outline current thinking related to what data centre services will be provided by SSC  To describe SSC’s proposed standard platforms and infrastructure and begin pre procurementand infrastructure and begin pre-procurement engagement with industry on service delivery options 26
  27. 27. Platform & Infrastructure Objectives • Standardization  Rationalize and consolidate like functions to standard specs.  Lower overall cost to GC of engineering and support  Find IT “commodities” and apply smart-sourcing principles to them  Cost efficiencies  Consistent service behaviours • Increase:Increase:  Automation  Service elasticity S i d li i t Service delivery consistency  Security 27
  28. 28. Approach • Leverage Current State Assessment of Partners, Industry Trends and GC IT Services Profile • Define target Data Centre Services to initiate the collaborative process of identifying and aligning to common service requirements • Define detailed service offering & requestg q specifications to drive procurement and development of Data Centre Services • Activate the Catalogue when Data Centre Services are available for deployment 28
  29. 29. Improve Service Value & Delivery Standard Common Services + Standard Service Options + Standard Service Level Tiers, minimizes technology variance and IT effort, while providing flexibility to customers Business Value ( g ) Standard Service Options Provide Feature Flexibility (ITIL Enhancing Services) Standard Service Level Tiers Provide Performance Options (ITIL Service Levels)( ) Standard DC Services  Deliver Value & Efficiency (ITIL Core Services) Common  Denominator Performance Delivers Business Outcomes Value Performance Business Outcomes Business V l Standard Enhancing  Service Package 1 + Satisfy Popular  Service Requirements Standard  Tiered Service Level  Pkg 1 + Satisfy different  Service Level Needs Satisfy Common  DC Service Req’ts i Resources & Capabilities Performance Delivers Business Outcomes Resources & Performance Delivers Business Outcomes Value Business Outcomes Standard Enhancing  Service Package 2 + Pkg 1 Standard  Tiered Service Level  Pkg 2 Standard + Data Centre Services Business  OperationsBusiness  Operations & CapabilitiesResources & Capabilities Business Processes  & Outcomes Business Unit Resources Standard Enhancing  Service Package 3 + Standard  Tiered Service Level  Pkg 3 + Business  OperationsBusiness  Operations & Capabilities DC Customer Facing and  Supporting Services   are  included in the overall SSC  Service Catalogue  & SSC Service Portal 29 All Partners
  30. 30. Proposed Data Centre Services • Application Hosting • Compute & Storage Provisioning DC Partner / End-User Facing Services DC Enabler Services • Database Hosting • Data Warehouse Hosting • Virtual Desktop Infrastructure • Backup / Recovery Service Data Archival Service• High-Performance Computing • File Service (GCDrive) • Data Archival Service • Facilities Management • Remote Admin Service • Distributed Print Service • Bulk Print Service St d d D l t • Remote Admin Service • Standard Development Environment 30
  31. 31. Proposed Tiered Service Levels ServiceParameter Development Standard Enhanced MissionCriticalService Parameter Development Standard Enhanced Mission Critical Hours of Operation 7x24x365 7x24x365 7x24x365 7x24x365 Hours of Support 5x12 DevSupportServices 5x12 StandardSupportServices 7x24 EnhancedSupportServices 7x24 CriticalSupportServicesDev Support Services with Continuous Monitoring Standard Support Services with Continuous Monitoring Enhanced Support Services with Continuous Monitoring Critical Support Services with Continuous Monitoring Availability 99.5% < 44 hrs. Annual Outage 99.8% Available < 18 hrs. Annual Outage 99.9% Available < 9 hrs. Annual Outage 99.9% Available < 9 hrs. Annual Outage Service Continuity Intra‐Data Centre High Avail. (lifecycle environments to  match Production) Intra‐Data Centre High Avail. Inter‐Data Centre High Avail. Inter‐Data Centre High Avail. Inter‐Region Disaster Recovery 31
  32. 32. Data Centre Element Framework 4 Security 5 Management & Ops 6 Business & Applications 3. Computing Platforms 4. Security • Security Operations Centre (SOC) – a part of Cyber Strategy • Integrated intrusion 5. Management & Ops. • Data Centre Operations (Level 1 support; part of NOC) • IT Service Management S i St t & T iti 6. Business & Applications • Partners’ business needs • Standardized Mainframe, Wintel, Lintel platforms to meet 90% of needs • Standardized database software and select middleware • Integrated intrusion protection, patch mgmt. and incident resp. • Service Strategy & Transition • Management Layer • Corporate Services IT Services Operations (People, Process, Technology) • Factory-engineered to SSC’s specs. 2. Infrastructure • Storage and network abstracted from Applications System Software (OS, Management, Virtualization) (ITSM) ement DBMS, Middleware (Web, Application, etc.) applications and users • Virtualized servers and storage for most efficient utilization • Converged or component infrastructure Ti ht i t ti ith l tf Server Storage Network Floor Space Power Cooling ServiceMgmt. rogramManage Security • Tight integration with platforms 1. Facilities • Most visible element of DCC B ildi l i li d h i l 32 Enterprise Data Centre (Facilities) ITS Pr • Buildings plus specialised mechanical and electrical systems
  33. 33. Proposed End State - Platforms • Meet >90% of platform needs with standardized Linux, Windows (growth platforms), and z/OS (sustainment platform) • Standardized application, database, and middleware platforms • Standardized and published release and support schedule and roadmap (n-1, n, n+1) • Standardized Service Catalogue and Service Levels • Highly automated deployment and management • Reduced administrative costs • On demand self service shared• On demand, self service, shared infrastructure • Infrastructure (storage, servers and network) abstracted from applications and users in resource pools • Measured service for most efficient utilization 33 • Adaptable, secure, standards based
  34. 34. Platform Technologies – Directions TBD Sustain Technologies whose disposition will be determined Technologies that will be maintained at current businesswill be determined over the coming months at current business volumes, with organic current business growth; no new business or kl d ill b Linux onLinux on System zSystem z z/OSz/OS SunsetGrow Technologies Technologies which workloads will be directed here Technologies where investments will be made, transformation will focus, and new Technologies which will be phased out over the course of the transformation; workloads will be Linux onLinux on x86x86 HPHP--UXUX AIXAIX business and workloads will be directed migrated to “Grow” platformsWindowsWindows SolarisSolaris MCPMCP 34
  35. 35. Platform Technologies – Example Use Cases GROW Example Use Cases Windows Linux z/OS Application Hosting    Enterprise Resource Planning  Document Management   Collaboration   Virtual Desktop / Thin Client  File Services File Services  Database / Data Warehouse   35
  36. 36. Proposed Platforms Interim Platform / Initial Proposed at End State Release Proposed at End State Operating System Windows Windows Server 2012 Windows Server Linux SUSE 11.2 or REHL 6.x SUSE Linux for zSeries Commercially Supported; determined via a Competitive processLinux Non Commercially Supported (?) Non-commercially Supported (?) Hyper-visor x86 Commercially supported VMWare vSphere 5.1 Commercially Supported; determined via a Competitive processWindows Server 2012 Hyper-V yp Non Commercial Linux NA Non-commercially Supported (?) 86 Oracle 11G R2 / Linux Commercially Supported; determined via Competitive processMS SQL Server 2012 /Windows DBMS x86 via Competitive processQ Server 2012 MySQL (?) / Linux Non-commercially Supported (?) System z IDMS, DB2 Commercially Supported determined via Competitive process Web Application Platforms .Net IIS v8 /.Net 2012 IIS v8 /.Net 2012 (?) Java Weblogic 12C / Websphere 8.0 & 8.5 / Linux Commercially Supported; determined via a Competitive process LAMP (?) LAMP (?) 36 LAMP (?) LAMP (?) Support of standard platforms will be restricted to three versions: n-1, n, n+1
  37. 37. Service Catalog: Service Offering Creation Create Service Template: The definition of software components and the communication pathscommunication paths between them: i.e. Web, Middleware, Database Specify Deployment Models: One or many different deployment sizes for deploying the Service Servers Networks StorageGC Cloud S M L C S i Off i Template, i.e. Small, Medium, Large Servers Networks StorageGC Cloud Define Service Options:Option 1 Create Service Offering: Requestable services, with costing, entitlement, and change approval configured are placed in the Online Options: A set of configurable options associated with a Service for users to select at request time, Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Opt o Option 2 Option 3 37 a e p aced t e O e Catalogi.e , Storage, Retention, Location, Service Level p
  38. 38. Data Centre Architecture Vision To provide a set of defined target services coupled with advanced featuresTo provide a set of defined target services coupled with advanced features of the underlying infrastructure to: • Provide a dynamic,“Just in time” computing environment that meets the varied li ti d d t i d f SSC P t i b iapplication and data processing needs of SSC Partners on an on-going basis • Establish a software continuum built up from elementary services through to full programmability and promoting a common application delivery model • Adapt and evolve over time in a manner that aligns with an ever-changing technological and market landscapes without incurring any penalties due to decisions made • Leverage virtualization to drive consistency and standardization across platforms, thereby reducing overall complexity and related costs • Support service model deployment innovation and cost savings through privateSupport service model deployment innovation and cost savings through private sector engagement 38
  39. 39. Target End State Enterprise  Consolidation I t t p Security • All departments share one  Operational Zone • Domains and Zones where  required Principles 1. As few data centres as  possible 2. Locations determined  objectively for the LT Application  Service Levels RegionalRegional International International GCNet Public  Cloud  Services Public  Cloud  Services Internet B2G C2G G2G Virtual  Private  Cloud Several, highly‐ secure Internet  access pointsrequired • Classified information  below Top Secret • Balance security and  consolidation • Consolidated, controlled,  secure perimeters objectively for the LT 3. Several levels of resiliency  and availability  (establish in pairs) 4. Scalable and flexible  infrastructure Service Level … Service Level Standard Enhanced Mission Critical Regional  Carriers Regional  Carriers CarriersCarriersGCNet (3,580 buildings) Regional WAN Accelerators access points Production Prod3 UU Prod4 UU Production Prod1 A Prod2 UU Service  Management secure perimeters • Certified and Accredited  infrastructure 5. Infrastructure  transformed; not ‘’fork‐ lifted’’ from old to new 6. Separate  application  development  i eSecurity Application Migration • Standard platforms and Workload Mobility Development Dev1 Dev2 B UU UU C U UU S A B S B UU ServiceMa Protected Data A Protected A B Protected B HPCManagement • ITIL ITSM Framework • Standardized Service  Levels/Availability Levels • Inclusive of Scientific and  special purpose computing environment 7. Standard platforms which  meet common  requirements  (no re‐architecting of  applications) Enterprise GC Private Domain Standard platforms and  product versions • Migration guidance • Committed timeline for  product evolution Stand‐alone centre for GC super‐ computing (HPC) – e.g. Weather anagement Classified Data Confidential Secret C S C Protected C HPC Sci1 special purpose computing • Standardized Application  and Infrastructure Lifecycle  Management • Smart Evergreening • Full redundancy – within  d b Virtualized Platforms Near‐line Tier 2 On‐line Tier 1 SAN NAS Virtualized Storage IP PBX App. Email Data Centre Core Network V.Conf. Bridge Web File/ Print Database Th.Client VDI Business Intent • Business to GovernmentSys. z App / DB Containers /OS pp ) 8. Build in security from the  beginning x86 Web / App / DB Containers Windows x86 Web / App / DB Containers Linux Virtualized Services 39 data centres, between  pairs, across sites Off‐line / Backup Archive Tier 3WAN  Node Domains & Zones Internet PoP • Government to Government • Citizens to Government Sys. z z/OS Any Special Purpose / Grid / HPC Operating System
  40. 40. Platform Procurement Outlook P fi d i t t d d lif l dPre-configured, pre-integrated and lifecycle-managed infrastructure and platforms (IaaS and PaaS) Enterprise Management (Enterprise Architecture, Service Management, Design & Orchestration, Vendor Relationship Management, Partner/Client Relationship) Self-Service Catalogue/Portal Enterprise Service Management, Capacity Management Retained or Supplier Processes (TBD) • Solutions provisioning • Applications Interoperability Supplier Processes • Supplier diversity for on-going best value • Built-in competition ensures continuous improvement Windows Standard Windows Clustered Linux Standard Linux Clustered Standard Platforms (ERP, DBMS, Web, App, File, Print, VDI, DW) loud Cloud ms/Services Supplier Processes continuous improvement • Workload Portability through open standards Private Cloud Virtual Compute (Hypervisor) x86 Servers Storage PublicCl HybridC VerticalPlatform • Lifecycle management • Capacity Management • Incident management • Asset management H l d k t Private Cloud • Horizontal vs. Vertical (e.g. DB appliance) • Standard vs. Cluster (High Availability) • Lease vs. Buy • Goods (Assets) vs. Services • Horizontal vs. Vertical (e.g. DB appliance) • Standard vs. Cluster (High Availability) • Lease vs. Buy • Goods (Assets) vs. Services V Alternative IT Infrastructure Service Delivery OpportunitiesRetained GC Functions • Helpdesk support C t t O tiC t t O ti 40 Standard vs. Cluster (High Availability) • Wintel vs. Lintel • Development vs. Production Goods (Assets) vs. Services • Separate Storage from Compute • Separate Service Management Standard vs. Cluster (High Availability) • Wintel vs. Lintel • Development vs. Production Goods (Assets) vs. Services • Separate Storage from Compute • Separate Service Management Contract Options:Contract Options:
  41. 41. Engaging Industry for Feedback Objective:Objective: • Allow for an exchange of information through discussion (during one-on-one sessions) with platform and( g ) p infrastructure experts that will ultimately inform Data Centre Consolidation strategies and procurement planning • Provide suppliers with the opportunity to share their knowledge with the GC on the following discussion topics (detailed slides to follow):( ) 1. Service Delivery Models (including service levels) 2. Value-added services (bundling, pre-configuration, etc.) 3. Contract(s) Period and Terms 4. Pricing Models 41
  42. 42. 1 Discussion  Topic Topic: Service Delivery Models 1Preferences: S li di i• Supplier diversity • Best way to achieve? • Suppliers managing the whole stack B t di i i f k? Vendor A Vendor B Vendor C • Best division of work? • Solution life-cycle management (patches, upgrading, release h d l t ) Data Centre #1 schedules, etc.) • Reasonable? • Suppliers delivering directly to end- t t d t t Vendor D Vendor E state data centres • Capacity on demand and capacity monitoring Data Centre #2 42
  43. 43. 2 Discussion  Topic Objective: Topic: Value-Added Services 2Objective: To leverage the capability of the vendor to deliver on repeatable and consistent pre-integration (commodity engineering): • Solution life-cycle management (patches, upgrading, release schedules, etc.) • Capacity monitoring and capacity on demand • Engineering and Integration done at the factory, to meet standard configurations • Management of O/S and Application images and packages where it makes sense (optionally) • Service Portal • Solution engineering • GFE (e.g. software assets) 43
  44. 44. 3 Discussion  Topic Recommended contract length (incl ding option ears)? Topic: Contract(s) Period and Terms 3• Recommended contract length (including option years)? • What is the best type of vehicle (supply arrangement / standing offer / standard contract / other) ? Pl f d S • Adding and subtracting services during the contract (substitution of services)? Platforms and Storage NDSTORAGE • Transformation • Service Consolidation Steady State  ‐ Infrastructure  Lifecycle  PLATFORMAN 2014 2020 Service Consolidation Time P Contract 1 Contract 2 Contract 3 Contract 4 Contract... 44 2014 2020 Primary years Time ‐ Years
  45. 45. 4 Discussion  Topic Topic: Pricing Options 4• Numerous pricing model options possible – adapt to elasticity, to meet business demand? • Pricing reviews at fixed intervals (based on market conditions) over the period of contract(s) advisable?of contract(s) advisable? • What are the factors that impact cost? • What are the levers to get best value? Basis of payment? Rates Review at fixed intervals (cost reduction based on market conditions) 1-2 years Rates 45 2014 Time 2016 2018 2020
  46. 46. OPERATIONAL/TECHNICAL: Questions for Industry Feedback 1. What Value-added services would you recommend that we should be incorporating? – Technical and operational considerations OPERATIONAL/TECHNICAL: – Procurement considerations 2. Is SSC’s proposed service catalogue comprehensive and meet industry best practices? 3. How can emerging trends/technologies be incorporated into the proposed solutions? How can we keep technologies up to date given length of transformation? How could they contribute to the Savings, Security and Service transformation objectives? 4 How can we leverage Government Furnished Equipment / assets lessons learned4. How can we leverage Government Furnished Equipment / assets, lessons learned, and previous experiences in delivering similar data centre service solutions? 5. How can we best utilize maximum pre-delivery configuration and integration? 6 What are the perceived barriers to success and risks that require mitigation6. What are the perceived barriers to success and risks that require mitigation strategies? 7. What technology, tools or features could be put in place to facilitate application migration? 46
  47. 47. PROCUREMENT: Questions for Industry Feedback PROCUREMENT: 1. What Pricing Model would be most beneficial to Canada? Are regular pricing reviews at fixed intervals over the period of contract(s) advisable? 2 What should contract length be (including option years)?2. What should contract length be (including option years)? 3. What usage-based or size-based licensing options, just-in-time capacity methodologies, innovative financing or other additional benefits related to the services provided can be leveraged to reduce our costs?p g 4. What recommendations can be provided on the approach for the technical evaluation of supplier proposals? 5. How could we modify requirements to maximize competitiveness and minimizey q p costs? What are the levers that impact costs? What other opportunities are there to consolidate and rationalize that we may have missed? 6. What are views or feedback on proposed procurement timelines. 7. Where should services be bundled and where should they not, to achieve best value? Where do you see the opportunity space and what logical groupings exist? 8. Which services or components should be subject to RFI’s? 47
  48. 48. Next Steps • Industry one-on-one engagements* (45 min each) to be held July 22 - 26 to obtain feedback on the discussion topics – Industry feedback will be incorporated into the statement of work • Initiate next phase of the procurement process - RFI andp p p RFRE Industry Day & Post RFIs Contract Award Jul 17-26 y y 1-on-1s Post RFIs and RFREs October December Post RFP 2013 2014 Close RFP March Apr - May RFP Evaluation June 2014 2014‐ Contract Award Aug - Sep February Note: suppliers must have pre registered for the one on one sessions SOLICITATION INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT RFRE & RFP DEVELOPMENT RFRE REVIEW/REFINE REQUIREMENTS (RRR) 2014 IMPLEMENTATION RFIS 48 Note: suppliers must have pre‐registered for the one‐on‐one sessions
  49. 49. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Collaborative Procurement Solutions Approachpp Stéphane Richard Senior Director, Procurement and Vendor Relationshipsp Shared Services Canada July 17, 2013 49
  50. 50. Approach – Collaborative Procurement Solution Description  An iterative approach to requirements definition involving a limited number of vendorsvendors  Reduce the probability of incompletely defined requirements leading to change requests  Requirements will reflect what Industry can provide cost-effectively and rapidlyq y p y p y while meeting GC constraints  Define contract terms and conditions in collaboration with Industry  Provide opportunity to generate new ideas based on industry input Request for Responses for Evaluation Review & Refine Requirements Phase (With successful Implementation Phase Bid Solicitation Phase Industry Engagement Phase Go Forward Decisions Go Forward Decisions Start of Execution Evaluation Phase respondents) PhasePhase Decisions Decisions 50
  51. 51. Request for Responses for Evaluation (RFRE) Phase The purpose is to qualify suppliers who have demonstrated and proven skills and experience in implementing and operating DC services. Evaluation criteria will focus on the supplier’s capabilities and experience to deliver DC services.p Canada will inform Successful Respondents that, in the “Review and Refine Requirements Phase”, a draft Statement of Work (SOW) will be provided to them and once the SOW is finalized(SOW) will be provided to them, and once the SOW is finalized, Successful Respondents will be requested to submit their list of IT products (equipment, software, services and network diagrams) as part of Canada’s Supply Chain Integrity (SCI) process.p pp y g y ( ) p 51
  52. 52. Review and Refine Requirements (RRR) Phase Canada will provide the Successful Respondents with a draft SOW. Canada will collaborate with Successful Respondents to seek feedback and clarification on Canada’s requirements to refine the SOW (e.g. one-on-one sessions, Q’s and A’s, written submissions,( g , , , etc.). Once the SOW is finalized, Canada will request that the Respondents provide their list of IT products and a network diagram. Canada intends to conduct the Supply Chain Integrity (SCI) verification over a period of 10 calendar days to ensure that all IT products and the network diagram meet Canada’s security andproducts and the network diagram meet Canada’s security and supply chain standards. 52
  53. 53. Review and Refine Requirements (RRR) Phase (continued) Upon completion of the SCI verification process, Canada will provide Respondents with written notification informing them if their IT d t li t d t k di dIT product list and network diagram are approved. If a Respondent’s IT products list is not approved, the Respondent will be briefed and have 10 calendar days following the receipt of Canada’s written notification to resubmit their IT products list and if necessary, their network diagram. If the Respondent’s IT products list is rejected a second time, therep p j , will be no further opportunities to resubmit a new IT products list and the Respondent will not be qualified to proceed to the next phase in the procurement process. Respondents whose IT product list and network diagram are approved by Canada will be deemed Qualified Respondents and will proceed to the “Bid Solicitation Phase”. 53 p
  54. 54. Bid Solicitation Phase Canada may issue one or more formal Request for Proposal (RFP) solicitations to the Qualified Respondents who have successfully passed the RFRE and RRR Phases. Each Qualified Respondent will be permitted to formally bid on the requirements set out in the RFP(s).requirements set out in the RFP(s). 54
  55. 55. Contract Award and Implementation Contract Award will take place upon completion of the evaluation during the Bid Solicitation Phase.during the Bid Solicitation Phase. One or more contracts may be awarded as a result of the Request for Proposal(s). 55
  56. 56. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Supply Chain Integritypp y g y Patrick Mountford, Director, Cyber Security Strategy Christian Caron A/Manager Cyber Threat Assessment UnitChristian Caron, A/Manager, Cyber Threat Assessment Unit Shared Services Canada July 17, 2013 56
  57. 57. Two-Step Process Request for Information (RFI)Request for Information (RFI) / Request for Responses for Evaluation (RFRE) / Review and Refine Requirements (RRR) SCI determination & pre-requisite National Security Exception posted on GETS Respondents provide list of Information and Communications Rejected respondent has 10 calendar days to resubmitInformation and Communications Technology (ICT) equipment, software and services DebriefNo j p y revised equipment list 1st Rejection 2nd Rejection SCI Authority reviews ICT list in consultation with Security Partners Decision by SCI Authority Debrief session with respondent No YesYes Respondent does not Receive Approval Letter for pre-qualification SSC issues RFP to Qualified Respondents 57 qualify Respondents
  58. 58. Required Information from the Respondents • Once the SOW is finalized GC will request that the respondents provideOnce the SOW is finalized, GC will request that the respondents provide their list of IT products and services. More specifically, when it applies, the GC will be requesting the following detailed information: 1. List of equipment used to deliver the service (vendor manufacturer, model number, software load version). 2 List of managed services (names of companies and the location from2. List of managed services (names of companies and the location from where these services are delivered). 3. Conceptual network diagrams showing third party dependencies and interconnections (includes physical and logical network topologyinterconnections (includes physical and logical network topology, depicting the nodes and connections amongst nodes in the network). 4. All of the above applies for sub-contractors and partners (sub- contractor and their own sub contractors) This should include allcontractor and their own sub-contractors). This should include all companies who will be sub-contracted to provide equipment or services as part of the DCC project. 58
  59. 59. On-going Supply Chain Integrity Auditing Supplier provides Rejected supplier has to resubmit revised equipment list Supplier provides revised list of ICT equipment On-going SCI auditing from the moment the contract SCI Authority reviews ICT list in consultation with Security Partners Decision by SCI Authority Debrief session with supplier No Yes the contract has been awarded until it ends. Yes Supplier receives Amendment Approval Letter SCI Authority monitors threats and audits results in consultation Threats? Internal threat evaluation can with Security Partners Debrief session with Yes lead to the questionning/exclusion of specific equipment/services 59 session with supplier
  60. 60. Cyber & Supply Chain Threats to the GCCyber & Supply Chain Threats to the GC Data Centre Consolidation Industry Day July 17, 2013 Carey Frey, Communications Security Establishment Canada 60
  61. 61. UNCLASSIFIED CSEC: What We Do CSEC C d ’ ti l t l i• CSEC: Canada’s national cryptologic agency • Our Mandate  Foreign Signals Intelligence  IT Security Support to Lawful Access Support to Lawful Access • ‘B’ MandateB Mandate  To provide advice, guidance and services to help ensure the protection of electronic information and of information infrastructures of importance to the Government of Canada 61 61 of importance to the Government of Canada
  62. 62. UNCLASSIFIED CSEC: IT Security Program W h l t d t t d d f d i t IT it• We help prevent, detect and defend against IT security threats and vulnerabilities • CSEC provides unique technical expertise, capabilities and classified information that we use to complement commercial security technologies available to IT security practitionerssecurity technologies available to IT security practitioners • We use our own methods and operations to detect andWe use our own methods and operations to detect and defend against threats that are not in the public domain 62 6 62
  63. 63. UNCLASSIFIED Effects of Market Forces on Technology • Market forces favour commercial and personal technologies over• Market forces favour commercial and personal technologies over requirements for security features • Our society is almost totally dependent on software and hardwarey y p commercial technology providers from global markets • New products and new versions of products are rapidly producedp p p y p • No regulatory framework exists for hardware/software safety and security • Traditional government policies and processes impose security requirements after products and systems have been developed 63 6 63 • Few incentives for commercial technology developers to invest in security
  64. 64. UNCLASSIFIED Technology Vulnerabilities • “People write software sloppily. Nobody checks it for mistakes before it gets sold”  Peiter Zatko (Mudge), WhiteHouse Cyber-Security Summit (2000) • Unintentional vulnerabilities or weaknesses  Design flaws  Implementation errors • Cyber Threat – a threat actor, using the Internet, takes advantage of a known vulnerability in a product for the purpose of exploiting a network and the information the network carries • Intentional vulnerabilities or weaknesses  Predetermined deliverables can be implanted in a product with or without knowledge of company. • Supply Chain Threat – a product can be easily tampered with in the supply chain to later facilitate a cyber-intrusion against that product in order to exploit a network and the information the network carries 64 6 64
  65. 65. UNCLASSIFIED The Evolving Cyber-Threat • Today, malicious cyber activities are directed against C d d l t lli d il b iCanada and our closest allies on a daily basis • Threat actors range in sophistication from malfeasantThreat actors range in sophistication from malfeasant hackers to organized crime groups, to terrorists to nation states • Canadians trust the GC to defend Canada’s cyber sovereignty and protect and advance our national it d i i t tsecurity and economic interests 65 6 65
  66. 66. UNCLASSIFIED An Issue of National Security • Risks from vulnerable technologies• Risks from vulnerable technologies  Covert and persistent access by cyber threat actors in Canadian data centre / cloud infrastructures threatens the sovereignty of GC information and the continuity of governmentsovereignty of GC information and the continuity of government operations  Cyber threat actors are effective at exploiting enterprise technologies and management systems used to administer andg g y operate data centre / cloud infrastructures • Risks from the supply chainpp y  Increases opportunities for threat actors to circumvent GC cyber security measures  More difficult for the GC to detect and remediate 66 6 66
  67. 67. UNCLASSIFIED GC Shared Services Procurements • Shared Services Canada and CSEC are working in partnership to eliminate or significantly reduce risks to the GC from cyber threats & global supply chain l bilitivulnerabilities • CSEC will provide follow-up briefings on supply chain risk mitigation to interested suppliers for GC shared services  Companies must be willing to sign a CSEC non-disclosure agreement to Companies must be willing to sign a CSEC non-disclosure agreement to receive this information • Security requirements for cyber-protection, cyber-defence and supply chain risk mitigation must be met by suppliers in order to successfully bid on GCg y y shared services initiatives  As the IT Security authority for the GC, CSEC will seek long-term partnerships with successful suppliers  CSEC will assist Shared Services Canada in the pedigree analysis of supply chain information provided by respondentschain information provided by respondents • Examples of these requirements can be found on CSEC’s website under Technology Supply Chain Guidance 67 6 67
  68. 68. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Questions & Answers 68
  69. 69. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Wrap-up & Closingp p g 69
  70. 70. Shared Services Canada • Data Centre Consolidation Industry Engagement Day Additional Material Shared Services Canada 17 July 2013 70
  71. 71. Workload and Data Containment in the Data Centre GCNet InternetInternet GCNet Physical PerimeterPhysical Perimeter Shared Physical Containment Area Dedicated Physical Containment Area Virtual Perimeters Virtual Perimeters Virtual Perimeters REZ REZOZOZPAZPAZOZ Data Restricted Zone Data Restricted Zone Data Restricted Zone Application Restricted Zone Application Restricted Zone Application Restricted Zone Storage Restricted Zone Storage Restricted  GCNet Internet Dedicated Virtual Containment Area Shared Virtual Containment Area Production and Development Data Centres Production and Development Data Centres Storage Restricted Zone Zone GCNet Internet Physical Perimeter Management Containment Area IPC Local Restricted  Zone Backup Restricted  Zone Partner/Owner  Application  Access  Restricted  Zone Monitoring Restricted  Zone Management  Restricted Zone (MRZ) Storage Re Public Access Zone (PAZ) Management Restricted Extranet Zone  (MREZ) Zone stricted Zone 71 Supporting Services ICAM IPAM NTP GC Domains & Zones Standard
  72. 72. Partner & User Facing Services • Application Hosting:  Provides two standardized “Platform as a Service” (PaaS) options for Partners’ COTS d C B ilt li tiCOTS and Consumer-Built applications:  Managed Operating System (OS) Platform service provides management of the “OS and Below”  Optional 3-tier Managed Application Platform with standardized database and platform middleware (Windows, J2EE and LAMP) and full management of “Everything but the Application” • Database Hosting:  Provides a standard solution specific to the needs of Partner Databases “Pl tf S i ” (P S) i l d iddl d t l f l di “Platform as a Service” (PaaS) includes middleware and tools for leading databases, residing on SSC’s standard managed Computing and Storage Infrastructure. Partners can provision their own databases and virtual resources 72  Partners can provision their own databases and virtual resources
  73. 73. Partner & User Facing Services • Standard Development Environment:  Platform service for developing/maintaining business systems for SSC’s standardized cloud-based environment.  Includes instances of 3-tier architecture deployed across five development phases (Dev, Test, UAT, Pre- Prod, and Training).  Transformation option is provided for transforming mature business systems (legacy) to run in SSC’s standardized cloud based environment. • Data Warehouse:  PaaS solution for Partners for data mining, query and reporting, complimented by Business Intelligence tools  Includes suite of ETL (Extract, Transform and Load) tools to move transactional data to Data Warehouse Hosting platform. • File Service (GCDrive):( )  Centralized, highly scalable, secure online storage solution for unstructured data and files.  Includes: Search, Encryption, Daily Backups and Offsite Archival, Anti-Virus & Malware Scanning, Multi- Format Support, Document Quick View, File Versioning, User Trace & Audit, and Policy based User t 73 quotas.
  74. 74. Partner & User Facing Services • High Performance Computing:  Fully managed platform for consumers with extreme performance computing needs  Basic service for intermittent computing needs supports self-service provisioningBasic service for intermittent computing needs supports self service provisioning  Enhanced service for steady state heavy computing demands and supporting services for specialized configurations Di t ib t d P i t S i• Distributed Print Service:  Allows users to print from anywhere and any device to any printer allowed by their User Account  Includes centralized monitoring and management of policies, printers and consumption • Bulk Print Service:  For consumers requiring very high volume and specialized print media  Fully managed with high volume distribution and mailing capabilities in secure, centralized printing facilities 74
  75. 75. DC Enabler Services • Compute & Storage Provisioning Service:• Compute & Storage Provisioning Service:  Highly available, secure and fully managed capability for computing and storage  Compute: Fully managed virtual infrastructure platform with container isolation for Guest OS and Workloads (Physical Bare Metal and Virtual Machine)  Storage: Various levels of data protection data availability and data performance in highly available online data repository Storage: Various levels of data protection, data availability and data performance, in highly available online data repository • Virtual Desktop Infrastructure:  Fully managed platform service for hosting virtualized desktops and common office applications  Allows users to access full featured virtual desktop from anywhere using a Desktop PC or thin client Allows users to access full featured virtual desktop from anywhere, using a Desktop PC or thin client  Provides significant TCO savings and rapid provisioning for users • Backup / Recovery Service:  Storage capacity for copies (backup) of data used for point in time data and system recovery in the event of failure or lossStorage capacity for copies (backup) of data used for point in time data and system recovery in the event of failure or loss • Data Archival Service:  Secure storage of older/less- utilised data, for longer-term retention; data are indexed and accessible by business users • Facilities Management:• Facilities Management:  Management of the physical assets for building space, security, power, backup power, climate, fire and cable plant as well as external Co-location services and hands-on support services to other Enabler Services (onsite feet on the ground) • Remote Admin Service: 75  Provides SSC system and Partner application administrators the ability for remote access
  76. 76. Common Capabilities For All Services Services reside on SSC’s Standard Fully Managed• Services reside on SSC’s Standard Fully Managed Computing, Storage and Network Infrastructure, in secure & robust Data Centres or authorized external service providers • Industry standards ensure Service Offerings & Requests are compatible with leading Tools for Portfolio, Service Catalogue, Self Service and Auto ProvisioningSelf-Service and Auto-Provisioning • Supporting Services:  Lifecycle Service & Systems Management Practices & Tools (ITIL 2011 + NIST + DC Mgmt, etc.)  Exposes / Integrates aspects of DC Service Management with Partners’ & Providers Service Mgmt  Lifecycle Technical Support for Partners developing, maintaining and using DC Services  Subscriber Services  Professional Services • Standard Tiered Service Levels (Service Level Targets & Commitments for each Tier) • Standard Tiered Service Capabilities (Activities & Tools needed to deliver each service and 76 Standard Tiered Service Capabilities (Activities & Tools needed to deliver each service, and specified Service Level Targets)

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