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Living and Working in FinlandEmployment and Economic Development Office of Jyväskylä, Finland
Finnish labour market 72 % of employees work under a permanent full time contract Some 15 % of employees work under a fi...
Employment and unemploymentin July 2012 Labour shortages and unemployment commonly occur  simultaneously in the Finnish l...
Regionallabour market situation(2011)
Labour shortagesmost problematic sectors: health care and servicesTOP 10 shortages in May 2012   registered nurses   lab...
Enough unemployed in May 2012   unskilled jobseekers (no education, no experience)   construction workers without vocati...
Searching for a job National labour administration: www.mol.fi  ”Avoimet työpaikat” (vacancies) > under ”Maakunta” select...
Terms of Employment Collective agreements (ca. 160) specifying pay rates  for various sectors like Commercial sector, Con...
 Regular working hours are usually at most 8 hours daily and 40 hours weekly, but in collective agreements it has been ne...
Some 68 % of workers belong to a trade unionThe central federations are:I. The Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Union...
Examples of gross incomes    Engineer 3 500 – 4 200 € / month    Carpenter 2 400 – 3 000 € / month    Secretary 2 100 –...
TaxationIncome tax:   Up to 6 months: tax at source 35%   NB! Tax deduction of 510 € each month or 17 € per day for each ...
Finnish unemployment benefits   Documents concerning work and education history required   U1/E301-form (transferring wo...
Services of Employment Office for foreignersIn order to be able to register as a jobseeker you must have:       - a reside...
If you have “Full Rights” for servicesyou can get:(Kela has issued you a decision on your right for Finnish social securit...
Jyväskylä Employment and EconomicDevelopment Office (TE-Office)Vapaudenkatu 58 AOpen daily at 9.00–15.45     EURES servic...
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Living and Working in Finland 2012

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Information to you who are considering about living and working in Finland.

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Transcript of "Living and Working in Finland 2012"

  1. 1. Living and Working in FinlandEmployment and Economic Development Office of Jyväskylä, Finland
  2. 2. Finnish labour market 72 % of employees work under a permanent full time contract Some 15 % of employees work under a fixed-term contract Some 12 % of employees have part-time contract 1-2 % of employees work as temporary agency workers Women generally participate in the labour market, their employment rate being 71 % About 70 % of the population has a vocational education Upper secondary school level qualifications 39 % Higher educations (University of Applied Sciences or University) 28 %Source: Statistics Finland 7/2012
  3. 3. Employment and unemploymentin July 2012 Labour shortages and unemployment commonly occur simultaneously in the Finnish labour market Employment rate 72,7 % Unemployment rate 10,2 % Espoo 6,9 Turku 14,6 Helsinki 8,9 Oulu 15,4 Vantaa 9,3 Tampere 14,2 Kuopio 11,3 Lahti 15,1 Jyväskylä 14,2
  4. 4. Regionallabour market situation(2011)
  5. 5. Labour shortagesmost problematic sectors: health care and servicesTOP 10 shortages in May 2012  registered nurses  laboratory nurses, radiographers  medical doctors  social workers  social welfare workers, personal assistants  nursery school teachers  special education teachers  cleaners  sales representatives and telemarketers  accounting staffSource: Occupational barometer, Ministry of Employment and the Economy
  6. 6. Enough unemployed in May 2012  unskilled jobseekers (no education, no experience)  construction workers without vocational education  industrial workers without vocational education  telecommunications engineers  IT operators and IT support persons  assemblers of electric and electronic products  tailors, dressmakers  artists (visual arts)  office workers  travel agents, guides Source: Occupational barometer, Ministry of Employment and the Economy
  7. 7. Searching for a job National labour administration: www.mol.fi ”Avoimet työpaikat” (vacancies) > under ”Maakunta” select the last option ”Koko Suomi” (whole Finland) > ”sanahaku” (keyword) > write ”English”> push enter EURES Portal: http://eures.europa.eu Academic recruitment services: www.aarresaari.net Companies often recruit through their own internet sites. Typical address is: www.companyname.fi List of 100 largest Finnish companies: www.uranus.fi Vacancies in the largest newspapers www.oikotie.fi Private recruitment agencies e.g. www.manpower.fi, www.adecco.fi, www.barona.fi, www.staffpoint.fi, www.hpl.fi The national helpline Työlinja +358 295 020 700 Mo-Fri between 8-18: Personal advice about work, jobs and labour market.
  8. 8. Terms of Employment Collective agreements (ca. 160) specifying pay rates for various sectors like Commercial sector, Construction industry, Hotel and restaurant industry, Financial sector etc. If there is no collective agreement (e.g. domestic helpers), the salary should be at least 1 103 €/month (in 2012) More information about labor legislation: www.tyosuojelu.fi, www.mol.fi/finnwork, www.tem.fiAsk for the employment contract in written form!
  9. 9.  Regular working hours are usually at most 8 hours daily and 40 hours weekly, but in collective agreements it has been negotiated down to an average of 37,5 hours Overtime is compensated with a higher rate of pay and there are limitations on overtime: it’s allowed to do maximum 138 hours of overtime during each four-month period and during a calender year a maximum of 250 hours Annual holiday is at least 4 weeks (when the employment has lasted up to a year) and 5 weeks (when the job has continued over a year) There are an average 9 paid national holidays a year
  10. 10. Some 68 % of workers belong to a trade unionThe central federations are:I. The Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions SAK (industries, transport, private service industries) www.sak.fiII. The Finnish Confederation of salaried Employees STTK (white-collar employees, service sector and industries) www.sttk.fiIII. The Confederation of Unions for Academic Professionals in Finland AKAVA www.akava.fi
  11. 11. Examples of gross incomes  Engineer 3 500 – 4 200 € / month  Carpenter 2 400 – 3 000 € / month  Secretary 2 100 – 2 400 € / month  Bus driver 2 500 € / month  Cleaner 1 600 – 2 400€ / month  Market seller 1 800 – 2 100 € /month  Nurse 2 800 – 3 300 € / month  Social worker 3 000 € / monthAn average Finnish salary 3190 €/month (January 2012) Source: Statistics Finland
  12. 12. TaxationIncome tax:  Up to 6 months: tax at source 35% NB! Tax deduction of 510 € each month or 17 € per day for each working day  More than 6 months: progressive income tax including:  Social security payments 7,9 %  Members of the Finnish Lutheran/ Orthodox church pay a church tax 1 – 2,15%  Local taxes vary from one city/municipality to the other  For example the share of all taxes and compulsory contributions salary 2500 €/month = 25 %, 3000 €/month = 29 %More information about taxation: www.vero.fi
  13. 13. Finnish unemployment benefits  Documents concerning work and education history required  U1/E301-form (transferring work history from other EU/EEA -countries)I. The Unemployment allowance (employment condition 34 weeks, ~ 8 months work in last 28 months) a) Basic allowance (paid by The Social Insurance Institution of Finland Kela) b) Earnings-related (unemployment funds, e.g www.ytk.fi )II. The Labour market subsidy  If you haven’t got enough work history  Benefit for a single person gross 31,36 €/day (in 2012) www.kela.fi (basic allowance and labour market subsidy) www.tyj.fi (earnings-related)
  14. 14. Services of Employment Office for foreignersIn order to be able to register as a jobseeker you must have: - a residence permit A or P (continuous or permanent) or - a residence permit B or an EU/EEA-citizenship.With B-permit you are not entitled to unemployment benefits.Registration for B-permit holders is recommended: - at the last stage of your studies (e.g. in last year) or - when you speak Finnish well.Without any registration you can get these services at ourRecruitment centre 1. floor: - help in creating CVs and applications by appointment - information on educational possibilities.
  15. 15. If you have “Full Rights” for servicesyou can get:(Kela has issued you a decision on your right for Finnish social security benefits)- Unemployment benefits- Vocational counselling (career planning)- Labour market training + job seeking training- Special services for disabled (occupational rehabilitation)- Subsidized placement and traineeships- Subsidy for job seeking travels in Finland- Start-up grant for setting up a business
  16. 16. Jyväskylä Employment and EconomicDevelopment Office (TE-Office)Vapaudenkatu 58 AOpen daily at 9.00–15.45  EURES services, 1. floor  Immigrant services, 3. floor (Open at 12.00-15.45)
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