The Future of Libraries: Making Stuff with Your Patrons

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(Presented at the 2012 Maine Library Association Conference)

Technology, eBooks and shrinking budgets are all causing libraries to rethink their position within the community. How can we reach out to our patrons when so much is limited? Luckily, advances in technology have made it easier for librarians to become community centers where their patrons can become active in a participatory culture. In this program, Justin Hoenke will explore a possible future for the public library where librarians will act as producers of content who work directly with their patrons. Justin will share his experiences with participatory programming for teens in hopes of encouraging librarians to look toward creating their own participatory environments in the public library.

Program developed by Justin Hoenke
Program presented by Michael Whittaker

Michael Whittaker has worked for the Portland Public Library for nine years. He managed the Reiche Branch - which served the most demographically diverse square mile in Maine - for six+ years and currently divides his time at the Main Branch between the Teen and Public Computing sections. He is a connectivist who, for over thirty years has created and inspired alternative delivery systems of cultural literacy to various youth constituencies and sub-cultures. His pioneering work with artists as diverse as: Sonic Youth, Sarah Brightman, Sting, Black Flag and projects such as The "Altered Book Project," http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/arts/design/23suth.html?pagewanted=all and "World's Longest Lobster Roll" http://www.pressherald.com/archive/record-rolltops-61-feet_2009-06-07.html have won Whittaker international acclaim as both an innovator and iconoclast.

Justin Hoenke is a teen librarian and video gaming enthusiast who has written about these subjects for publications such as Library Journal, VOYA, and is a regular contributor for the blog Tame The Web. Justin is a member of the 2010 ALA Emerging Leaders class and an MLIS graduate of the Department of Library Science at the Clarion University of Pennsylvania. He is currently the Teen Librarian for a Southern Maine library where he is responsible for teen collection development, teen programming, and content creation as well as overseeing the video game and graphic novel collection for the library system. His professional interests include video gaming in libraries, teen librarianship, creating local collections, and community building.

Follow Justin on Twitter at @justinlibrarian and read his blog at http://www.justinthelibrarian.com

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The Future of Libraries: Making Stuff with Your Patrons

  1. 1. MAKING STUFF WITH YOUR PATRONSPresentation by Michael Whittaker in collaboration with Justin Hoenke
  2. 2. ENCOURAGE CREATIVITY
  3. 3. PARTICIPATORY CULTURE Preserving a community’ “Everything we do s digital heritage is the should be measured by work of both libraries and the benefit [to] the public museums, but involving the community in these efforts is imperative as we move forward. “Participation occurs when someone welcomed as a guest feels as though they have become a hostRead this for more info! http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/02/opinion/michael-stephens/the-age-of-participation-office-hours/
  4. 4. TECHNOLOGY Technology doesn’t solve our problems, but it can be a conduit to making change and promoting progress -Michael Stephenshttp://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/02/opinion/michael-stephens/the-age-of-participation-office-hours/
  5. 5. TECHNOLOGY THE ANSWER? CONNECT WITH YOUR PATRONS
  6. 6. TECHNOLOGY ...and these technologies could help you out quite a bit...
  7. 7. REALLY GREAT READSBeyond the Walled Garden: LIS Students in an Era of Participatory Culture by Michael Stephenshttp://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1067&context=slissrjThe Age of Participation by Michael Stephenshttp://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/02/opinion/michael-stephens/the-age-of-participation-office-hours/Services More Meaningful Than Ebooks by Aaron Schmidthttp://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/aaron-schmidt/services-more-meaningful-than-ebooks-the-user-experience/Think Like a Startup by Brian Matthewshttp://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/bitstream/handle/10919/18649/Think%20like%20a%20STARTUP.pdf?sequence=1
  8. 8. LETS CONTINUE THIS CONVERSATION justinthelibrarian.com @justinlibrarian whittaker@portland.lib.me.us
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