Digital approaches for the arts - 2013 - Unthinkable Consulting
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Digital approaches for the arts - 2013 - Unthinkable Consulting

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A set of slides from my talk for IT4Arts in February 2013. The focus of the talk was to look at a range of digital approaches that organisations and artists have used over the last few years and ...

A set of slides from my talk for IT4Arts in February 2013. The focus of the talk was to look at a range of digital approaches that organisations and artists have used over the last few years and consider how we might apply the lessons learnt to our future activity. I have included some speaker's as part of the slides so that it makes more sense a stand-alone piece of content.

Justin Spooner - Director - Unthinkable Consulting

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  • 1. Digital approaches for the arts  w i t h s o m e s p e a k e r ’s n o t e s J u s t i n S p o o n e r D i r e c t o r a t U n t h i n k a b l e C o n s u l t i n g
  • 2. One idea that we hold dear at Unthinkable is that technologyis about creating better connections, not just moreconnections.!Better connections between people.!Better connections between ideas.!Better connections between ideas and people, and peopleand machines!It permeates all our thinking and you’ll see that bias runningthrough my talk
  • 3. Trends are dangerous
  • 4. George Lois: “Trends are a search for something safe – and a reliance on them leadsto oblivion….Trends can tyrannize; trends are traps. In any creative industry, the factthat others are moving in a certain directions is always proof positive, at least to me,that a new directions is the only direction. (Damn Good Advice by George Lois)!That art is vital is not likely to be questioned in this room.!But is digital vital? The first trend is to answer quickly and enthusiastically yes. Whatelse could you say in good company like this?!But consider your own view to digital. !Does it make art better, does it help your organisations grow and therefore celebrate orcreate more of it? Is digital purely the means or can it be the ends? Does digitalenhance experiences for audiences and participants? Is the effort of making greatdigital experiences worth it for you and your organisation? Can you really create bettercreative connections with it?!As you assess these trends I put before you like some digital arts evangelist, I’d likeyou to push back a little and keep your critical faculties primed and ready.!
  • 5. We are not to be led by technology
  • 6. There  is  a  tremendous  pressure  to  keep  up  with  the  next  big  thing.  Simply  responding  to  that  pressure  means  le9ng  technological  change  happen  to  you.  I’d  like  to  start  this  session  building  out  from  the  end  of  a  previous  session.  The  Engaging  Digital  Audiences  in  Museums  conference  that  happened  in  July  2012.  It  brought  together  museum  people  and  technologists.  To  quote  from  the  blog  post  summary  –    Despite  being  a  conference  about  technology  use,  everyone  was  very  clear  that  it  is  very  necessary  to  resist  being  technology  driven.  
  • 7. Archives come alive
  • 8. In  his  later  years  Percy  Grainger  on  yet  another  of  his  missions  wanted  to  purge  the  English  language  of  words  with  LaMn  roots,  so  the  word  “museum”  was,  in  his  system,  to  be  replaced  with  the  term  “Hoard  House”  There  has  been  so  much  work  done  on  moving  museums  away  from  this  hoarding  idea  towards  a  perhaps  more  enlightened  role.  But  it  is  starMng  to  feel  like  there  is  a  new  possibility  opening  up,  enabled  by  digital  technology,  to  get  back  to  that  hoard  house  idea.  But  this  Mme  the  Hoard  House  is  also  my  house.  Examples  Rijksmuseum  Google  Art  Project  Google  Cultural  InsMtute  Retronaut  YouTube  Time  Machine    
  • 9. Shops become public archives
  • 10. The  visual  arts  are  all  of  a  moment  reinvenMng  themselves  in  the  form  of  highly  approachable  digital  shops  The  Economist  very  recently  did  a  piece  on  this  latest  trend.  The  first  brilliant  line  of  the  arMcle  is  this  -­‐  FEW  cultural  mediums  have  defied  the  digital  revoluMon  quite  like  the  art  market.  This  piece  led  me  to  consider  an  intriguing  tension  that  the  visual  arts  have  always  had  to  grapple  with  –  the  relaMonship  between  their  commercial  drivers  and  their  public  purpose  Something  that  feels  like  a  Mghter  Mghtrope  than  ever.  Artsy  is  a  shop  that  seems  to  want  to  put  enormous  efforts  into  a  user  experience  that  focuses  on  the  pleasure  of  discovery  –  without  the  need  to  purchase  but  always  the  possibility  Examples  Art.sy  Etsy  Culture  Label  S.EdiMon  Art  Space  Art  Finder  
  • 11. The internet turns us all into memory institutions 
  • 12. Whether  we  like  it  or  not  increasingly  our  role  will  be  to  provide  the  basis  of  a  public  memory  Tony  Ageh  –  Controller  of  Archive  Development  at  the  BBC,  has  coined  a  term  –  Digital  Public  Space  He  doesn’t  mean  the  name  to  sound  like  a  website  or  a  thing,  it  is  more  like  an  agenda  –  one  I  think  is  worth  considering:  He  envisages  a  way  we  could  make  content  available  to  the  public  that  has  these  defining  characterisMcs  openness,  persistence,  engagement,  partnerships,  access  and  public  benefit.    Of  all  these  let  me  focus  on  persistence  for  a  moment  The  arts  are  fantasMcally  good  at  creaMng  fleeMng  moments  –  a  great  coming  together  of  art,  arMsts  and  audience  and  then  –  poof  –  its  gone.  Just  a  memory  for  those  parMcipants  and  quite  o^en  some  well  cra^ed  markeMng  material  all  wri_en  in  future  tense  describing  in  glowing  terms  an  event  that  had  yet  to  be.  What  could  and  should  have  been  le^  behind?  The  last  few  years  of  digital  development  are  challenging  us  all  to  come  up  with  a  new  answer  that  be_er  fits  our  public  purpose.  Three  examples  of  this  ongoing  cultural  preservaMon  –  historic  building  conservators,  those  sites  like  retronauts  and  Jubliee  Mme  capsule,  developers  who  create  simulators  of  past  computer  technology  so  that  we  can  access  our  digital  pasts.  The  company  code  mysMcs  has  created  a  number  of  these  simulators  and  created  apps  for  iOS.  
  • 13. Some  like  the  New  Museum  are  making  available  their  own  insMtuMonal  memories  as  a  lens  on  the  art.  ‘Since  1977  the  New  Museum  has  been  in  the  forefront  of  presenMng  contemporary  art  and  cultural  pracMce  in  New  York  City.  The  Digital  Archive  provides  researchers  with  free  online  access  to  primary  source  materials  from  New  Museum  exhibiMons,  public  programs,  and  publicaMons.  Through  this  interface,  users  can  explore  approximately  7,500  wri_en  and  visual  records,  as  well  as  a  searchable  database  of  over  4,000  arMsts,  curators,  and  organizaMons  associated  with  the  New  Museums  programming.  New  materials  are  being  processed,  digiMzed,  and  added  to  the  Digital  Archive  as  they  become  available.’  Jubilee  Mme  capsule  ‘Last  year  saw  the  Queen  celebrate  her  Diamond  Jubilee  and  60  years  as  head  of  the  Commonwealth.To  mark  both  the  Royal  Commonwealth  Society  created  the  Jubilee  Time  Capsule  an  online  social  archive,  containing  stories  from  people  across  all  54  Commonwealth  countries,  either  as  a  wri_en  memory,  a  film,  an  audio  recording  or  a  photographic  memory.  Over  37,000  people  submi_ed  contribuMons,  via  jubileeMmecapsule.org  and  an  Apple  app.  But  80,000  stories  were  collected  in  all  and  live  on  the  site.  Some  of  the  other  best  entries  are  of  7th  June  1954  –  The  legacy  of  Alan  Turing  as  remembered  by  his  former  PhD  student,  and  14th  November  1990  –  a  personal  account  by  Paralympic  athlete  Oscar  Pistorius,  who  recalls  his  childhood  realisaMon  that  disability  is  not  synonymous  with  disadvantage.’  Capsool  the  company  behind  delivering  that  project  call  themselves  –  Inventors  of  the  temporal  web  
  • 14. Curation is an essential public service
  • 15. Whether  it  is  done  by  you,  an  expert  out  there,  or  your  audience  Let’s  explore  this  highly  contenMous  word  curaMon:  There  are  blogs  and  websites  driven  by  personal  energy  and  commitment  like  one  of  my  favourites  Brainpickings  that  trawl  through  several  lifeMme’s  worth  of  art  and  culture  related  material  in  order  to  bring  me  the  top  picks.  There  is  automated  curaMon  that  happens  on  sites  like  Art.sy  for  visual  art  and  Last.Fm  for  music  There  are  organisaMons  like  the  Walker  Art  Center  that  use  editorial  curaMon  as  a  way  to  be  interested  in  the  world  around  them  There  are  the  thousands  upon  thousands  of  tumblogs  and  pinboards  –  where  cascades  of  images  pour  down  the  screen,  somehow  conveying  connecMons  and  odd  juxtaposiMons  as  they  go  -­‐  these  sites  force  you  to  engage  and  derive  meaning,  significance  or  at  the  very  least  pleasure  from  a  seemingly  random  grouping  of  pictures.  ‘ArMsts  o^en  cling  to  control  of  their  work  and  the  context  of  its  display,  but  to  interact  with  Tumblr,  they  must  give  up  that  control.  Art  on  Tumblr  might  get  seen  by  many  people,  but  1,000  reblogs  doesn’t  mean  anyone  will  be  looking  at  your  art  the  next  week,  know  who  made  it  or  understand  it  in  a  meaningful  way.’  Hyperallergic  and  Tumblr  have  joined  forces  to  present  “ The  World’s  First  Tumblr  Art  Symposium.”  –  March  9th  
  • 16. Silbermann  Pinterest’s  co  ownner  suggests  that  collecMng  online  is  a  form  of  self-­‐expression  for  people  who  don’t  create.  “If  you  walk  around  Brooklyn  and  ask  people  how  they  express  themselves,”  he  said  in  a  speech  at  New  York  University,  “everyone’s  a  musician  or  an  arMst  or  a  filmmaker.  But  most  of  us  aren’t  that  interesMng.  Most  of  us  are  just  consumers  of  that.  And  when  we  collect  things  and  when  we  share  those  collecMons  with  people,  that’s  how  we  show  who  we  are  in  the  world.”  This  is  what  Lauren  Northop  form  the  Hermitage  Museum  and  Gardens  (Virginia)  has  to  say:  If  anything  has  ever  moved  me  to  punch  my  fist  through  my  computer  screen,  it  is  the  recent  gross  misappropriaMon  of  the  word  CURATE,  most  parMcularly  by  a  certain  type  of  blogger.  The  flagrant  misuse  of  this  sacred  (to  me,  and  I  assume  to  other  curators)  word  has  spread  like  wildfire  through  the  precious  world  of  home,  cra^  and  decor  blogging  and  is  infecMng  the  internet  like  a  virus.  The  very  meaning  of  the  word  is  starMng  to  change,  and  that  makes  me  crazy.  
  • 17. Creativity gets better connected
  • 18. Making things together
  • 19. The  great  power  and  saMsfacMon  of  art  is  o^en  found  in  the  making  Can  digital  help  us  make  that  art,  can  it  bring  new  people  into  the  experience,  can  it  enrich  our  relaMonship  with  the  act  of  making?  
  • 20. ConnecMng  creators  of  all  kinds  is  essenMal  Unthinakble  worked  with  Heart  n  Soul  on  the  Dean  Rodney  Singers  project  in  2012.  Its  a  project  thats  near  impossible  to  summarise  without  pictures,  sound  and  a  great  deal  of  hand  waving,  but  heres  an  a_empt:  the  singer  and  composer  Dean  Rodney  had  a  vision  of  an  internaMonal  collaboraMon  involving  72  musicians,  singers  and  dancers  both  with  and  without  learning  disabilites  in  seven  countries  to  create  something  amazing  together  as  part  of  London  2012.  As  the  project  began  to  take  pracMcal  shape,  this  involved  Dean,  working  with  Charles  Stuart,  generaMng  23  tracks  of  raw  musical  material,  which  could  then  have  layers  of  musical  and  visual  creaMvity  overlaid  by  arMsts  in  Brazil,  South  Africa,  Germany,  CroaMa,  China,  Japan  and  Britain.  The  song  creaMon  process  ran  across  several  phases  and  used  iPads  as  the  primary  creaMve  tool.  It  culminated  in  an  installaMon  in  the  Southbank  Centre  in  early  September  2012  which  was  itself  designed  to  encourage  interacMon  and  musical  invenMon  from  visitors.  Midi  is  30  years  old!  But  the  challenge  to  connect  our  tools  remains  as  important.  The  new  challenge  is  to  go  beyond  connected  machines  and  to  find  ways  to  connect  different  creators.  
  • 21. Making art
  • 22. ArMsMc  Development  ENO  MINI  Operas  The  Museum  of  Non  ParMcipaMon  Karen  Mirza  and  Brad  Butler  ‘…the  duo  developed  The  Museum  of  Non  ParMcipaMon:  a  roaming,  ever-­‐evolving  collecMon  of  audio-­‐visual  works,  workshops,  presentaMons,  and  other  acMviMes  that  has  traveled  to  Egypt,  Pakistan,  Germany,  and  the  UK.  Created  as  a  way  to  iniMate  and  build  dialogue  around  issues  of  direct  acMon,  acMvism,  and  resistance  that  specific  to  its  temporary  locaMons—and  as  an  alternaMve  to  tradiMonal  museums  as  repositories  of  coveted  objects—the  Museum  of  Non  ParMcipaMon  is  paradoxically  dependent  on  parMcipaMon.’  [from  Walker  Art  Center  website]  
  • 23. Making choices
  • 24. Giving  your  audience  some  real  choices  beyond  the  purchase  of  a  Mcket  Brooklyn  Museum  -­‐  ‘Brooklyns  Got  Talent’  From  their  rather  brilliant  website:  ‘Brooklyn  Museum  is  tesMng  a  new  construct  of  audience  engagement  with  its  current  exhibit  GO:  A  Community-­‐Curated  Open  Studio  Project.    GO  combines  two  exisMng  tacMcs:  inviMng  the  public  into  studios  of  working  arMsts  to  see  where  and  how  artwork  is  made,  and  crowdsourcing  the  selecMon  of  that  artwork  through  an  open  voMng  process  which  then  makes  an  exhibiMon  at  the  museum.    During  the  GO  weekend,  1800  Brooklyn-­‐based  arMsts  were  asked  to  open  their  studios  to  the  community  on  September  8–9,  2012.  Community  members  registered  as  voters  visited  studios  and  nominated  arMsts  for  inclusion  in  a  group  exhibiMon  to  open  at  the  Brooklyn  Museum  onTarget  First  Saturday,  December  1,  2012.    There  was  of  course  anxiety  about  how  many  of  the  4,929  eligible  voters  (those  who  checked  in  to  more  than  5  studios)  would  conMnue  their  engagement  into  the  nominaMon  phase.  We  anMcipated  that  we  would  lose  some  people,  but  again,  as  has  o^en  happened  with  GO,  we  have  been  pleasantly  surprised  with  the  results.  Our  nominaMon  period  ended  on  Tuesday  night.  We  received  9,457  nominaMons  over  seven  days.  Of  the  eligible  voters,  78%  of  them  took  the  next  step  to  recommend  arMsts.  While  we  allowed  visitors  to  select  up  to  three  arMsts,  many  chose  fewer—23%  nominated  1  arMst;  10%  nominated  2  arMsts;  and  67%  nominated  3  arMsts.’  They  had  a  lot  of  trouble  with  the  app,  it  kept  crashing,  a  lot.  But  when  it  did  work  it  made  the  experience  really  fun  for  families  touring  around.  Comment  from  the  website:  I  think  the  GO  Project  as  conceived  was  extremely  ambiMous,  risky  even.  As  one  of  the  arMsts  who  parMcipated,  I  applaud  that  ambiMon.  The  Times  review  has  a  chastening  tone.  Everything  it  says  is  likely  accurate,  but  the  art  world  suffers  in  general  from  not  enough  people  taking  enough  chances.  
  • 25. Making meaning
  • 26. In  John  Carey’s  book  ‘What  good  are  the  arts?’  he  points  out  that  meanings  are  not  inherent  in  objects,  they  are  supplied  by  those  who  interpret  them.  So  it  ma_ers  a  great  deal  who  does  that  interpretaMon  if  we  want  diverse  and  surprising  meaning  to  unfold  around  our  art.  Many  organisaMons  are  experimenMng  with  different  ways  to  encourage  the  generaMon  of  new  meaning  by  web  user  or  physical  visitors.  Our  work  with  the  Wellcome  CollecMon  is  focusing  exactly  that  challenge,  in  our  view  it  one  of  the  most  exciMng  ideas  that  digitally  accessible  art  and  collecMons  gives  rise  to.  
  • 27. Physical and digital combine to createunique experiences
  • 28. Digital  combined  with  physical  can  bring  different  audiences  together  Google  Labs  and  Tellart  create  the  Chrome  web  labs  project  for  the  Science  Museum  Digital  combined  with  physical  can  augment  your  gallery  experience  The  Cleveland  Museum  of  Art  h_p://www.clevelandart.org/artlens  MONA  h_p://journal.davidbyrne.com/2013/01/012113-­‐monaism.html  Digital  combined  with  physical    can  enable  new  kinds  of  storytelling    Punch  Drunk  collaboraMon  with  MIT  on  Sleep  no  more  The  PlaystaMon  3  game  –  the  Wonderbook  New  technologies  and  making  it  much  cheaper  to  capture  physical  gestures  and  with  be_er  definiMon  h_ps://leapmoMon.com/  
  • 29. Forget Likes, Fans & Followers 
  • 30. The  term  social  media  obscures  something  that  is  Mmeless  about  the  way  humans  connect  with  each  other  We  can  easily  become  obsessed  with  the  tools  and  get  focused  on  the  the  thin  end  of  the  story  I’d  prefer  to  hear  about  your  conversaMon  strategy  than  your  social  media  strategy  What  might  a  conversaMons  strategy  include?  ++  Having  something  to  talk  about  ++  Your  approach  to  being  interesMng  ++  Perhaps  more  importantly  –  your  way  of  being  interested  ++  Your  approach  to  sparking  new  conversaMons  ++  Your  approach  to  bringing  people  into  new  relaMonships  and  conversaMons  ++  Your  approach  to  responding  to  criMque  ++  Your  approach  to  acMvely  listening  Some  cultural  organisaMons  do  listen  to  and  parMcipate  in  online  debate,  but  for  many  it  remains  a  series  of  conversaMons  that  are  taking  place  elsewhere  –  out  of  earshot.  
  • 31. We are all Mobile
  • 32. At  Kings  Cross  recently  I  noMced  as  I  walked  alongside  the  taxi  rank  of  about  20  cabs  that  every  single  driver  had  a  mobile  device  in  their  hand,  on  their  lap  or  leaning  on  the  wheel.  The  range  of  devices  was  staggering,  Im  not  sure  I  saw  the  same  device  twice.  There  were  different  Kindles,  iPads,  Samsung  tablets,  and  every  kind  of  smart  phone.  Some  cabbies  were  texMng,  some  watching  TV,  some  reading,  very  few  were  on  the  phone.  Clearly  mobile  does  not  just  mean  the  device,  it  means  the  mode  of  experience  -­‐  to  be  mobile.  To  create  great  mobile  experiences  is  an  interesMng  design  challenge  to  say  the  least.  Arts  organisaMon  audience  have  a  bias  towards  the  use  of  high-­‐end  mobile  technology.  71%  of  visitors  to  the  V&A  in  autumn  2012  owned  a  smartphone  and  25%  of  the  rest  planned  to  buy  one  in  the  next  year  –  compared  with  50%  of  the  general  populaMon.    The  big  debate  in  2012  and  likely  to  rage  this  year  as  well  is  how  to  respond  to  this  mobile  environment.  OrganisaMons  are  now  weighing  up  the  benefits  of  creaMng  naMve  apps  for  devices  vs  a  more  web  app  approach.  Or  they  are  considering  whether  to  create  a  bespoke  mobile  website  or  to  try  and  create  a  responsive  design  approach  that  will  scale  elegantly  to  different  devices.  
  • 33. The demands of on-demand
  • 34. The  first  Mcketed  public  concert  was  in  London  in  1672.  It  was  organised  by  a  composer  and  violinist  called  John  banister  shortly  a^er  he  was  fired  from  the  royal  band.  The  price  was  one  shilling  and  the  audience  could  make  requests.  By  1877  Edison  had  invented  the  wax  cylinder  recorder.  The  sound  quality  led  him  to  iniMally  market  them  as  dictaMon  machines  The  New  York  Times  predicted  that  this  would  lead  to  owners  becoming  collectors  of  speeches.  To  quote  ”Whether  a  man  has  or  not  a  wine  cellar  he  will  certainly,  if  he  wishes  to  be  regarded  as  a  man  of  taste,  have  a  well  stocked  oratorical  cellar.  From  1990  TED  launched  as  an  expensive  event  you  would  never  be  going  to  From  2006  we  had  TED  on-­‐demand  Since  June  2006,  the  talks  have  been  offered  for  free  viewing  online,  under  A_ribuMon-­‐NonCommercial-­‐NoDerivs  CreaMve  Commons  license,  through  TED.com.As  of  November  2011,  over  1,050  talks  are  available  free  online.By  January  2009  they  had  been  viewed  50  million  Mmes.  In  June  2011,  the  viewing  figure  stood  at  more  than  500  million,  and  on  Tuesday  November  13,  2012,  TED  Talks  had  been  watched  one  billion  Mmes  worldwide,  reflecMng  a  sMll  growing  global  audience.  [wikipedia]  So  what  happened  in  2012?  The  BBC  went  on-­‐demand  crazy  for  the  Olympics,  with  every  sport  having  its  own  on-­‐demand  channel.  The  Arts  Council  with  the  BBC  focused  the  UK  arts  world  with  its  The  Space  project.  Opera  went  big  for  on-­‐demand  but  it  split  the  pack.  Glyndebourne  worked  well  with  the  Guardian,  the  Royal  Opera  House  went  for  cinemas  but  the  English  NaMonal  Opera  pushed  back.  Their  arMsMc  director  John  Berry  has  this  to  say  "If  opera  in  cinema  becomes  the  main  event  and  not  the  live  work  on  stage,  we  feel  that  is  not  a  step  forward  but  a  step  back,"  he  said,  arguing  that  "this  obsession  about  pu9ng  work  out  into  the  cinema  can  distract  from  making  amazing  quality  work".  Speaking  to  The  Stage  newspaper,  he  added:  "It  is  not  a  priority.  It  doesnt  create  new  audiences  either.”  David  Sabel,  the  head  of  digital  media  at  the  NaMonal  Theatre  and  producer  of  works  for  its  cinema  arm,  NT  Live,  said  the  experience  of  watching  performances  in  a  cinema  rather  than  on  television  "sMll  offers  a  shared  experience.  They  laugh  along  with  the  audience  and  applaud  at  the  end.”  One  conclusion  of  the  Arts  &  Business/MTM  report  in  2010  was  that  the  vast  majority  of  people  who  access  online  cultural  experiences  (videos,  recordings  etc.)  also  a_end  cultural  events.  It  notes  that  “Crucially,  this  (online)  engagement  augments,  rather  than  replaces,  the  live  experience”.  
  • 35. Intellectual propertybattles will not resolve anytime soon
  • 36. But  that  should  not  stop  us  trying  new  things  for  a  second  Story  of  Google  Books  ba_le  with  the  AAP  The  associaMon  of  american  publishers  launched  a  lawsuit  against  Google  in  2005.  in  2012  the  AAP  se_led  –  It  took  around  seven  years  to  agree  this:  US  publishers  can  choose  to  make  available  or  choose  to  remove  their  books  and  journals  digiMzed  by  Google  for  its  Library  Project.  Those  deciding  not  to  remove  their  works  will  have  the  opMon  to  receive  a  digital  copy  for  their  use.”  The  strange  bit  is  that  these  are  pre_y  much  the  same  opt-­‐out  terms  that  Google  offered  the  AAP  when  this  suit  started  almost  exactly  seven  years  ago.  So  why  the  seemingly  endless  fight?  Because  seven  years  ago  the  e-­‐book  market  was  very  young  and  the  publishers  were  in  freak-­‐out  mode.  The  iniMaMve  has  been  hailed  for  its  potenMal  to  offer  unprecedented  access  to  what  may  become  the  largest  online  body  of  human  knowledge[9][10]  and  promoMng  the  democraMzaMon  of  knowledge,[11]  but  it  has  also  been  criMcized  for  potenMal  copyright  violaMons.  As  of  March  2012,  the  number  of  scanned  books  was  over  20  million,  but  the  scanning  process  has  slowed  down.[13]  Google  esMmated  in  2010  that  there  were  about  130  million  unique  books  in  the  world,[14][15]  and  stated  that  it  intended  to  scan  all  of  them  by  the  end  of  the  decade.  WHAT  on  earth  is  going  to  happen  when  3D  printers  become  mainstream?  These  skirmishes  are  really  creaMng  a  grey  haze  about  things  we  need  to  and  can  change:  Looser  collaboraMve  IP  contracts  –  creaMve  partnership  
  • 37. Who is giving?Who is paying?
  • 38. People  in  the  arts  know  this  well:  The  gi^  economy  runs  alongside  the  market  economy  The  evidence  shows  that  greater  engagement  in  the  arts  leads  to  greater  giving  If  you  only  focus  on  making  your  audience  consumers  of  your  excellent  wares  rather  than  parMcipants  or  it  is  harder  to  ask  for  more  money.  You  are  almost  training  audiences  not  to.  We  all  need  to  create  stories  that  make  the  case  for  support.  Outreach,  learning  and  community  projects  can  have  a  vital  visibility  online,  that  enable  your  organisaMon  to  tell  the  fuller  story  about  your  mission.  An  independent  report  commissioned  by  the  Secretary  of  State  for  Culture,  Media  and  Sport  on  the  scope  for  harnessing  digital  technology  to  boost  charitable  giving  to  the  culture  and  heritage  sectors  made  these  high-­‐level  recommendaMons  to  Government:  Encourage  the  industry  to  collaborate  to  simplify  digital  giving  systems  Extend  the  Digital  R&D  Fund  Introduce  a  matching  scheme  for  online  donaMons  Join  up  Government  policy  on  philanthropy  and  giving  
  • 39. The  funding  picture  is  shi^ing,  in  my  view  in  three  posiMve  ways:  Crowd  funding    Public  InnovaMon  funding  Corporate  funding  Here  let’s  focus  on  Crowd  funding  Kickstarter  came  to  the  UK  at  the  end  of  October  -­‐  h_p://www.kickstarter.com/  Kickstarter  is  an  American-­‐based  private  for-­‐profit  company  founded  in  2009  that  provides  through  its  website  tools  to  fund  raise  for  creaMve  projects  via  crowd  funding.[1]  StaMsMcs  for  projects  from  UK-­‐based  creators  (October  31,  2012  —  November  30,  2012)  Total  Pledged:  £2,069,164  -­‐  Total  Backers:  45,799  -­‐  Launched  Projects:  407  Successfully  Funded  Projects:  30In  Kickstarters  first  month  in  the  UK,  an  amazing  £2  million  was  pledged  to  UK  creators.  That  works  out  to  £48  in  pledges  each  minute.Of  the  400  projects  that  have  launched,  30  have  already  been  successfully  funded  and  many  more  are  on  their  way.  A  public  art  project  called  the  Chime  Pavilion  was  the  first  successfully  funded  project,  with  triple  its  funding  goal.  The  very  first  project  to  launch,  a  hardware  project  called  Picade,  was  successfully  funded  with  £74,000  pledged  —  double  its  funding  Where  are  those  backers  located?    Heres  a  breakdown:  UK  backers:  39%  -­‐  EU  backers:  23%  -­‐  US  backers:  23%  -­‐  Other  areas:  15  To  date,  39%  of  backers  have  come  from  within  the  UK  and  61%  have  come  from  outside  of  it.  (For  US  projects,  78%  of  backers  have  been  from  the  US  and  22%  outside  of  it.)  Of  the  EU  countries,  Germany,  Sweden,  France,  Denmark,  and  the  Netherlands  are  home  to  the  most  backers  so  far.  Most,  but  not  all,  successful  crowd  schemes  have  the  following  characterisMcs:  +++  They  rely  on  large  numbers  of  small  donaMons,  playing  on  the  sense  of  “Being  in  with  the  In-­‐Crowd”,  usually  at  levels  of  money  that  supporters  are  prepared  to  lose;    +++  They  involve  some  form  of  reciprocal  value,  such  as  a  number  of  Mckets  to  the  opening  night  of  the  film,  signed  copies  of  the  album  or  book  or,  in  the  case  of  investment  funding,  a  prospect  of  financial  return;  +++  They  are  typically  personalised,  with  the  sponsor  or  fundraiser  being  idenMfiable,  so  providing  funding  is  essenMally  a  social  act,  not  an  economic  transacMon.  
  • 40. -----------------
  • 41. Forget the wowFocus on your core  ( t h a t w i l l r e a l l y w o w t h e m ! )
  • 42. Put the user at thecentre of your world
  • 43. You need a mixed up team
  • 44. From top tobottom
  • 45. S o t h a t y o u c a n PlanAdaptEmerge
  • 46. L a s t l y We all need to help create thetechnolog y-ar tists of tomorrow
  • 47. J u s t i n S p o o n e r D i r e c t o r a t U n t h i n k a b l e C o n s u l t i n g j u s t i n @ u n t h i n k a b l e c o n s u l t i n g . c o m