Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Sgcp12 smith-nationalgrid

44

Published on

www.cir-strategy.com/events

www.cir-strategy.com/events

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
44
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Future Transmission NetworksRichard SmithFuture Transmission Networks Manager4th Annual Smart Grids & Cleanpower 2012 Conferencewww.cir-strategy.com/events
  • 2. The future: efficiency, decarbonisationand electrification Electricity Heat Transport Smart Meters & Efficiency and Insulate and reduce innovation Appliance efficiency Heat pump and decarbonise Decarbonised electricity… new homes & retrofit transport Gas backup Biomethane & embedded generation CNG De-carbonise heat 2
  • 3. Network capacity will need to increaseDistribution networks will need to Distribution network operation willmore than double their capacity… change in future… ¾  More distributed and micro generation (solar 2010 2030 2050 PV, CHP etc.)Household ¾  Electric vehicle and heat pump demand ~2.5kW ~4.7kW ~7kWdemand* increasing load dramatically in hot spot areasNumber of 26m 31m 36mhomes Smart network initiatives will see aEmbedded ~8GW ~15GW ~20GW move away from radial operation…generation ¾  Grid Supply Points being permanentlyNetwork interconnected, opening up the possibility ofloading ~75 ~170 ~300 loop flows through the distribution networks(kW/km) ¾  Possibility of local dispatch within DistributionNetwork scale X2.3 X4.0 networks to control local flows* After diversity average Network scale vs ¾  Two-way, variable power flows increase withpeak demand 2010 levels demand side response 3
  • 4. When will capacity need to increase?Emissions intensity pre appliance (g/kWh) 1,000 Window for transport 800 Window for heat 600 400 200 0 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Electricity (total grid) Marginal electricty for transport Marginal electricty for heat Natural Gas Gas-Biogas mix Oil Oil-Biofuel mix Appliance efficiency will also determine the optimum transition point and may extend the window 4
  • 5. Where might this happen? 5
  • 6. Transmission is already largely smart Network OutputCondition monitoring Measures Risk management Remote asset management and Voltage Controlmonitoring (RAMM) Circuit Rating Auto-switching Enhancement schemes Operational Tripping Schemes (OTS) Power Flow Control Remote Substation Control 6
  • 7. Now to 2020: generation build more significant than EVs and heat pumps existing electricity network interconnectors Change under Gone Green (GW) potential wind farm sites 40 potential nuclear sites 30 Norway 20 10 0 Ireland (10) Netherlands (20) (30) Belgium Generation Demand Gas Nuclear Coal France Hydro Interconnector Wind Biomass Marine Gas France Oil Electric cars* Heat pumps* 7* Electric vehicle and heat pump at mid-range peak demand.
  • 8. The need for more smart actions Scotland to England unconstrained transfers Gone Green Scenario simulated with ELSI 12000.0 Volume of required operational smart operation task increasing 10000.0 management actions increasing 8000.0 2020 proposed intact netw ork firm N-2 capacity 6000.0 2013MW 2 x HVDC links + Series compensation 2020 4000.0 2013 planned intact netw ork firm N-2 capacity 2000.0 0.0 0.0 1000.0 2000.0 3000.0 4000.0 5000.0 6000.0 7000.0 8000.0 -2000.0 Hours 8
  • 9. Balancing supply and demand Variable generation Active distribution networksMW1,6001,4001,2001,000 Smart(er) grids 800 600 & meters, 400 200 energy storage 0 01-Jan 10-Jan 20-Jan 30-Jan 05-Jan 25-Jan 15-Jan Large generation Generation Active demand Demand 60 Peak Commuting Time Peak Commuting Time 55 Electricity Demand (GW) 50 2020 Demand ~ 15 GWh (daily) - 1.5 45 million vehicles Optimal Charging Period Typical winter daily demand 40 12,000 miles p.a. 35 30 00:00 01:00 02:00 03:00 04:00 05:00 06:00 07:00 08:00 09:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00 Time of Day Time of use tariffs Smarter transmission Inflexible generation Smart zones Distributed generation HVDC Series compensation WAM 9
  • 10. 500 0 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 00 03 :00 06:00 09:00 12:00 15:00 18:00 02/01/2012 21:00 00:00 03 :00 06:00 09:00 12:00 15:00 18:00 03/01/2012 21:00 00:00 03 :00 06:00 09:00 12:00 15 :00 18:00 04/01/2012 When the wind blows… 21:00 00:00 03 :00 06:00 09:00 12:00 Wind Forecast 15 :00 18:00 05/01/2012 21:00 00:00 03:00 06:00 Wind Actual 09:00 12:00 15 :00 18:00 06/01/2012 Power 21:00 00:00 03:00 06:00 4m/s 09:00 12:00 15 :00 18:00 07/01/2012 21:00 00:00 03 :00 15m/s 06:00Wind Speed 09:00 12:00 15 :00 18:00 08/01/2012 21:00 25m/s :0 0 Wind Cut-out 3rd January 2012 10
  • 11. Making transmission smarter ¾  Optimising asset utilisation ¾  Improving power system access Fit for Purpose Network ¾  Enhancing boundary transfer capability. ¾  Better network modeling and prediction Timely provision of ¾  Improved planning & operational flexibility information to inform ¾  Balancing generation with demand decisions ¾  Intelligent network automationDevelop services to deliver ¾  Managing the generation mix energy securely and ¾  Flexible networks efficiently ¾  Demand side management. 11
  • 12. New technology & systemsSystem Monitoring & Visualisation¾  Widespread installation of sensors and monitors¾  Network expansion¾  Data storage and capacity management¾  Applications to support real time managementNetwork Automation¾  Assist Control Engineer workload¾  Manage complex processes¾  Automatic fault restoration¾  Foundations of regional autonomyWide Area Protection & Control¾  Manage network stability¾  Coordinate power flow and voltage control between regions¾  System integrity protection schemes¾  Regional congestion management 12
  • 13. Control philosophy change Primary asset Control Philosophy cost for given capacity Transition very hard HIGHER Traditional approach. People centric process. Conventional asset Planning/Consenting Difficulty N-2 (lead time) ENSG approach Assets worked dynamically into very short term ratings Steady state flows Dynamic flows Solving peak half hour Need to solve all points and implies operable at all points transitions LOWER Operator Response Time hard <1 sec 0-5 mins 5-20 mins 20 mins – 6 hrs post fault continuous rating CONTROL RISK 13
  • 14. Delivering resilience Process Safety Robust automation Operational complexity Understand complexity Identify Fail safe modes Transmission Develop end to end solutions Smarter Transmission System Awareness Good prediction System monitoring Scenario analysis Modelling validation Quality of informationNetwork management Regional autonomy Information flow System Network Managing Third Party actions security utilisationInterfaces with legacy systems 14 Coordinate
  • 15. At the heart of the energy transformation… 15

×