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Hvmg14ozylgavis

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www.hvm-uk.com 2014 Talk at HVM Graphene+ Oxford

www.hvm-uk.com 2014 Talk at HVM Graphene+ Oxford

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 1. Innovation doesn’t just fall from the sky: law and policy Pēteris Zilgalvis, J.D., @PZilgalvis Visiting EU Fellow; Associate, Political Economy of Financial Markets Programme St. Antony's College, University of Oxford HVM Graphene+ 2014 Conference Oxford, UK 15 May www.hvm-uk.com
  • 2. 2 •  Innovation: •  To the OECD definition, I would add •  Commercial - have you manufactured and found a market? •  Public Sector or Social - have you implemented and is it replicable?
  • 3. 3 •  A Government role? •  Important for societal challenges such as: •  Demographic change and health •  Climate change and energy •  Modernisation of education Security/Defence/Cybersecurity For a conducive regulatory & business environment
  • 4. 4 European Council Conclusions on innovation 24-25 October 2013
  • 5. October European Council •  Covered a range of topics including the digital economy and innovation •  Investment and innovation in the digital sphere will be key drivers of future growth, jobs and competitiveness. •  Europe is not yet taking full advantage of the opportunities afforded by the digital economy, in large part due to market fragmentation •  Completing the digital single market by 2015 is therefore a high priority
  • 6. Bridging the innovation gap •  The Union's intellectual and scientific potential does not always translate into new products and services that can be sold on markets. •  The main reasons for this commercialisation gap are: difficulties in accessing finance, market barriers and excessive red tape. •  The grouping of research institutes and industry ("clusters") can provide the ground for fruitful interaction between them and for the emergence of new products, services and industries.
  • 7. Better coordinated use of tools to support research and innovation •  Europe needs a better-coordinated use of tools such as grants, pre-commercial public procurement and venture capital, •  Europe needs an integrated approach from research and innovation to market deployment. •  Special attention should be paid to the role of the public sector in enabling systemic innovations •  Open access to publicly funded research results and knowledge transfer as part of innovation strategies at national and European levels.

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