Going Up By: Shemedeley Capito, Jessica P., Michael Lucius, Justin K. Esguerra
Early Flight Plans During the Middle Ages, thinkers outlined ideas for building machines that could travel in the air.  Ho...
Early Flight Plans <ul><li>During the Middle Ages, thinkers outlined ideas for building machines that could travel in the ...
The Mongolfier Brothers Experiment <ul><li>In 1783 the Montgolfier brothers, in France, built a balloon that successfully ...
The Mongolfier Brothers Experiment <ul><li>In 1783 the Montgolfier brothers, in France, built a balloon that successfully ...
A uthor ’ s Purpose <ul><li>4. The author organizes the information in the introductory paragraph of “Going Up” by providi...
A uthor ’ s Purpose <ul><li>4. The author organizes the information in the introductory paragraph of “Going Up” by providi...
A uthor ’ s Purpose <ul><li>4. The author organizes the information in the introductory paragraph of “Going Up” by providi...
Successful Ideas(1) <ul><li>The new experiment worked.  The king’s historian stayed about 80 feet up in the air for four a...
Successful Ideas(1) <ul><li>The new experiment worked.  The king’s historian stayed about 80 feet up in the air for four a...
Successful Ideas(1) <ul><li>The new experiment worked.  The king ユ s historian stayed about 80 feet up in the air for four...
Successful Ideas(2) <ul><li>Some physicists, realizing this, found a way of making hydrogen-filled balloons. First, they v...
Successful Ideas(2) <ul><li>Some physicists, realizing this, found a way of making hydrogen-filled balloons. First, they v...
Successful Ideas(3) <ul><li>Others thought that it was the moon, which had fallen down to crush the earth.  To quell these...
Successful Ideas(3) <ul><li>Others thought that it was the moon, which had fallen down to crush the earth.  To quell these...
Successful Ideas(4) <ul><li>In December 1783 two French scientists went up in a hydrogen balloon.  They traveled a distanc...
Successful Ideas(4) <ul><li>In December 1783 two French scientists went up in a hydrogen balloon.  They traveled a distanc...
Using A Balloon to Fly <ul><li>An American doctor, in 1784, made the first scientific record of air pressure at  high alti...
Using A Balloon to Fly <ul><li>An American doctor, in 1784, made the first scientific record of air pressure at  high alti...
The Presidential Use of Balloons <ul><li>In 1793 President George Washington watched a  balloon ascend in Philadelphia.  D...
The Presidential Use of Balloons <ul><li>In 1793 President George Washington watched a  balloon ascend in Philadelphia.  D...
Balloons Containing Objects <ul><li>In 1870 the Prussian armies surrounded Paris.  For four months the  Parisians kept in ...
Balloons Containing Objects <ul><li>In 1870 the Prussian armies surrounded Paris.  For four months the  Parisians kept in ...
The Continues of Using Balloons <ul><li>During the 20th century, balloons have been used for the exploration of the  upper...
The Continues of Using Balloons <ul><li>During the 20th century, balloons have been used for the exploration of the  upper...
Author's Organization <ul><li>How does the author organize the article “Lighter Than Air”?  </li></ul><ul><li>A. by explai...
Author's Organization <ul><li>How does the author organize the article “Lighter Than Air”?  </li></ul><ul><li>A. by explai...
Hydrogen Balloons(1) <ul><li>A gas balloon is any balloon that stays aloft due to being filled with a gas less dense than ...
Hydrogen Balloons(1) <ul><li>A gas balloon is any balloon that stays aloft due to being filled with a gas less dense than ...
Hydrogen Balloons(1) <ul><li>A gas balloon is any balloon that stays aloft due to being filled with a gas less dense than ...
Hydrogen Balloons(2) <ul><li>Gas ballooning has been popular in Europe, most notably in Germany.  Gas balloon clubs exist ...
Hydrogen Balloons(2) <ul><li>Gas ballooning has been popular in Europe, most notably in Germany.  Gas balloon clubs exist ...
Hot-Air <ul><li>A hot air balloon gets its lift from heating air using propane fuel.  Hot air balloons are based on the ba...
Hot-Air <ul><li>A hot air balloon gets its lift from heating air using propane fuel.  Hot air balloons are based on the ba...
Balloons in your City
Balloons in your City <ul><li>Welcome, Balloon Fans!  </li></ul>
Question 1 <ul><li>The section “Ballooning Over Broward” is different from the other sections of the artcle </li></ul>
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Balloons dont touch!! or virus

  1. 1. Going Up By: Shemedeley Capito, Jessica P., Michael Lucius, Justin K. Esguerra
  2. 2. Early Flight Plans During the Middle Ages, thinkers outlined ideas for building machines that could travel in the air. However, no such machines were ever built at that time. In the 17th century, an Italian priest designed a flying machine composed of a wicker basket attached to four thin metal balls. He thought that if all the air were taken out of the balls the machine would be light enough to float in the air. We now realize, however, that these empty balls would have been crushed by atmospheric pressure. In the 18th century, a Scottish professor suggested that animal bladders filled with hydrogen might float in the air. However, this idea, too, remained untried.
  3. 3. Early Flight Plans <ul><li>During the Middle Ages, thinkers outlined ideas for building machines that could travel in the air. However, no such machines were ever built at that time. In the 17th century, an Italian priest designed a flying machine composed of a wicker basket attached to four thin metal balls. He thought that if all the air were taken out of the balls the machine would be light enough to float in the air. We now realize, however, that these empty balls would have been crushed by atmospheric pressure. In the 18th century, a Scottish professor suggested that animal bladders filled with hydrogen might float in the air. However, this idea, too, remained untried. </li></ul><ul><li>Thinkers in the Middle Ages came up with many ideas for air travel but none were ever tested . </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Mongolfier Brothers Experiment <ul><li>In 1783 the Montgolfier brothers, in France, built a balloon that successfully carried a man into the air. The brothers had noticed that smoke rises and floats in the air, and so they tried filling paper bags with smoke. When this proved successful, they tried the same experiment with cloth bags. They soon discovered that smoke rises when the air around it is cooler. However, as soon as smoke cools, it stops rising. Consequently, they made a little fire of charcoal on a pan underneath the bag. This arrangement kept the air under the bag warm for some time. </li></ul><ul><li>After three months of experimentation, the Montgolfier brothers sent some animals up in a balloon. For this occasion, King Louis XVI came to the town of Annonay where the Montgolfiers lived. The brothers put a duck, a rooster, and a sheep in a basket attached to the bag. Then they sent the whole thing into the air. The bag stayed up for eight minutes, and landed safely. Plans were quickly made for a man to go up. </li></ul><ul><li>The king was willing to provide for the experiment a criminal who had been sentenced to death. However, the king ユ s historian said that he would be honored to go himself. A month later the balloon was ready. Under the balloon they erected a platform large enough for a man, a fire pan, and damp straw that could burn slowly to provide the necessary heat and smoke. </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Mongolfier Brothers Experiment <ul><li>In 1783 the Montgolfier brothers, in France, built a balloon that successfully carried a man into the air. The brothers had noticed that smoke rises and floats in the air, and so they tried filling paper bags with smoke. When this proved successful, they tried the same experiment with cloth bags. They soon discovered that smoke rises when the air around it is cooler. However, as soon as smoke cools, it stops rising. Consequently, they made a little fire of charcoal on a pan underneath the bag. This arrangement kept the air under the bag warm for some time. </li></ul><ul><li>After three months of experimentation, the Montgolfier brothers sent some animals up in a balloon. For this occasion, King Louis XVI came to the town of Annonay where the Montgolfiers lived. The brothers put a duck, a rooster, and a sheep in a basket attached to the bag. Then they sent the whole thing into the air. The bag stayed up for eight minutes, and landed safely. Plans were quickly made for a man to go up. </li></ul><ul><li>The king was willing to provide for the experiment a criminal who had been sentenced to death. However, the king ユ s historian said that he would be honored to go himself. A month later the balloon was ready. Under the balloon they erected a platform large enough for a man, a fire pan, and damp straw that could burn slowly to provide the necessary heat and smoke. </li></ul><ul><li>Mongolifier brothers conducted many experiments to test their balloon for air travel. </li></ul>
  6. 6. A uthor ’ s Purpose <ul><li>4. The author organizes the information in the introductory paragraph of “Going Up” by providing </li></ul><ul><li>reasons why flight was never attempted in the Middle Ages. </li></ul><ul><li>information about early flight ideas that were not tested. </li></ul><ul><li>a description of the first unsuccessful fight attempts. </li></ul><ul><li>the effects of man’s desire to travel in the air. </li></ul>
  7. 7. A uthor ’ s Purpose <ul><li>4. The author organizes the information in the introductory paragraph of “Going Up” by providing </li></ul><ul><li>reasons why flight was never attempted in the Middle Ages. </li></ul><ul><li>information about early flight ideas that were not tested. </li></ul><ul><li>a description of the first unsuccessful fight attempts. </li></ul><ul><li>the effects of man’s desire to travel in the air. </li></ul><ul><li>“ In the 18th century, a Scottish professor SUGGESTED that animal bladders filled with hydrogen might float in the air. </li></ul>
  8. 8. A uthor ’ s Purpose <ul><li>4. The author organizes the information in the introductory paragraph of “Going Up” by providing </li></ul><ul><li>reasons why flight was never attempted in the Middle Ages. </li></ul><ul><li>information about early flight ideas that were not tested. </li></ul><ul><li>a description of the first unsuccessful fight attempts. </li></ul><ul><li>the effects of man’s desire to travel in the air. </li></ul><ul><li>“ In the 18th century, a Scottish professor SUGGESTED that animal bladders filled with hydrogen might float in the air. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Successful Ideas(1) <ul><li>The new experiment worked. The king’s historian stayed about 80 feet up in the air for four and a half minutes. A month later, the same historian and a colleague went up 500 feet and stayed there 25 minutes, floating over Paris. Not long after, a bigger balloon carried seven passengers 3,000 feet over Lyons. Despite their apparent success, these balloons had certain disadvantages. For one thing, the fire was always a possible source of danger because it might ignite the balloon . </li></ul>
  10. 10. Successful Ideas(1) <ul><li>The new experiment worked. The king’s historian stayed about 80 feet up in the air for four and a half minutes. A month later, the same historian and a colleague went up 500 feet and stayed there 25 minutes, floating over Paris. Not long after, a bigger balloon carried seven passengers 3,000 feet over Lyons. Despite their apparent success, these balloons had certain disadvantages. For one thing, the fire was always a possible source of danger because it might ignite the balloon. </li></ul>Successful Flights
  11. 11. Successful Ideas(1) <ul><li>The new experiment worked. The king ユ s historian stayed about 80 feet up in the air for four and a half minutes. A month later, the same historian and a colleague went up 500 feet and stayed there 25 minutes, floating over Paris. Not long after, a bigger balloon carried seven passengers 3,000 feet over Lyons. Despite their apparent success, these balloons had certain disadvantages. For one thing, the fire was always a possible source of danger because it might ignite the balloon. </li></ul>Successful Flights Balloon Troubles
  12. 12. Successful Ideas(2) <ul><li>Some physicists, realizing this, found a way of making hydrogen-filled balloons. First, they varnished fine silk so that no hydrogen could pass through it. Then they had to obtain enough hydrogen to fill the silk balloon. When the first hydrogen balloon was finally completed and sent up, it rose to 3,000 feet above Paris. It stayed in view for an hour and came down in a field 15 miles away. There it was promptly torn into pieces by peasants who were afraid of it. Some peasants thought it was an evil spirit. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Successful Ideas(2) <ul><li>Some physicists, realizing this, found a way of making hydrogen-filled balloons. First, they varnished fine silk so that no hydrogen could pass through it. Then they had to obtain enough hydrogen to fill the silk balloon. When the first hydrogen balloon was finally completed and sent up, it rose to 3,000 feet above Paris. It stayed in view for an hour and came down in a field 15 miles away. There it was promptly torn into pieces by peasants who were afraid of it. Some peasants thought it was an evil spirit. </li></ul>Discovery of Hydrogen Balloons
  14. 14. Successful Ideas(3) <ul><li>Others thought that it was the moon, which had fallen down to crush the earth. To quell these misapprehensions, the king issued a proclamation describing balloons, telling people not to be afraid of them, and ordering everyone not to damage them. The Montgolfier brothers’ balloon was piloted by Jean- Francois Pitatre de Rozier and Francois Laurent. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Successful Ideas(3) <ul><li>Others thought that it was the moon, which had fallen down to crush the earth. To quell these misapprehensions, the king issued a proclamation describing balloons, telling people not to be afraid of them, and ordering everyone not to damage them. The Montgolfier brothers ユ balloon was piloted by Jean- Francois Pitatre de Rozier and Francois Laurent. </li></ul>Balloon Confusion
  16. 16. Successful Ideas(4) <ul><li>In December 1783 two French scientists went up in a hydrogen balloon. They traveled a distance of 25 miles and stayed up almost two hours. When the balloon landed, one of the men stepped out and the other man quickly shot up in the balloon to a height of 9,000 feet! He found the air up here very cold and very thin. He did, however, return safely to earth. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Successful Ideas(4) <ul><li>In December 1783 two French scientists went up in a hydrogen balloon. They traveled a distance of 25 miles and stayed up almost two hours. When the balloon landed, one of the men stepped out and the other man quickly shot up in the balloon to a height of 9,000 feet! He found the air up here very cold and very thin. He did, however, return safely to earth. </li></ul>Sky Rocket to OVER 9,000 feet
  18. 18. Using A Balloon to Fly <ul><li>An American doctor, in 1784, made the first scientific record of air pressure at high altitudes. Soon after that, two Frenchmen flew across the English Channel in a hydrogen balloon. It took them two hours to cross from Dover to Calais. However, the balloon leaked, and some gas was lost. The men almost fell into the water, but they threw out their ballast and most of their clothes in order to make a safe landing on ground. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Using A Balloon to Fly <ul><li>An American doctor, in 1784, made the first scientific record of air pressure at high altitudes. Soon after that, two Frenchmen flew across the English Channel in a hydrogen balloon. It took them two hours to cross from Dover to Calais. However, the balloon leaked, and some gas was lost. The men almost fell into the water, but they threw out their ballast and most of their clothes in order to make a safe landing on ground. </li></ul>Discovered High Altitudes Travel in a hydrogen balloon
  20. 20. The Presidential Use of Balloons <ul><li>In 1793 President George Washington watched a balloon ascend in Philadelphia. During the next 100 years balloonists, like acrobats, were popular at fairs and celebrations. One man dropped leaflets from a balloon–copies of poems he had written about the joys of flying. Another man made a practice of letting his balloon burst, and then using it as a parachute to float slowly down to earth. </li></ul>
  21. 21. The Presidential Use of Balloons <ul><li>In 1793 President George Washington watched a balloon ascend in Philadelphia. During the next 100 years balloonists, like acrobats, were popular at fairs and celebrations. One man dropped leaflets from a balloon–copies of poems he had written about the joys of flying. Another man made a practice of letting his balloon burst, and then using it as a parachute to float slowly down to earth. </li></ul>Use for fairs and celebrations Use it as a parachute
  22. 22. Balloons Containing Objects <ul><li>In 1870 the Prussian armies surrounded Paris. For four months the Parisians kept in touch with the outside by means of balloons and carrier pigeons. Quite a lot of mail and messages were carried by balloons. Balloons also aided over 100 people, including many political leaders, to escape from Paris. After this war, balloon corps were established in the armies of many large countries. During the First World War, they were used for observation, especially for the spotting of submarines. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Balloons Containing Objects <ul><li>In 1870 the Prussian armies surrounded Paris. For four months the Parisians kept in touch with the outside by means of balloons and carrier pigeons. Quite a lot of mail and messages were carried by balloons. Balloons also aided over 100 people, including many political leaders, to escape from Paris. After this war, balloon corps were established in the armies of many large countries. During the First World War, they were used for observation, especially for the spotting of submarines . </li></ul>Mail and messages carried by balloons Use to spot submarines in war
  24. 24. The Continues of Using Balloons <ul><li>During the 20th century, balloons have been used for the exploration of the upper atmosphere and stratosphere. Before the era of rockets and spaceships, men went up in balloons to a height of 14 miles. Weather forecasters find balloons most useful in finding out what the weather is like at different places and different levels of the atmosphere. The balloons send back the recordings of the instruments they carry by way of small shortwave radios. Such observations help the forecasters predict what the weather is going to be. Although balloons are not easy to steer and can only travel as fast as they are pushed by the wind, they have served an important function by introducing human beings to the pleasures and problems of flight. Through the use of balloons it became evident that it was indeed possible for people to travel in the air </li></ul>
  25. 25. The Continues of Using Balloons <ul><li>During the 20th century, balloons have been used for the exploration of the upper atmosphere and stratosphere. Before the era of rockets and spaceships, men went up in balloons to a height of 14 miles. Weather forecasters find balloons most useful in finding out what the weather is like at different places and different levels of the atmosphere. The balloons send back the recordings of the instruments they carry by way of small shortwave radios. Such observations help the forecasters predict what the weather is going to be. </li></ul><ul><li>Although balloons are not easy to steer and can only travel as fast as they are pushed by the wind, they have served an important function by introducing human beings to the pleasures and problems of flight. Through the use of balloons it became evident that it was indeed possible for people to travel in the air </li></ul>Its possible to fly with balloons Forecasters use it to predict weather
  26. 26. Author's Organization <ul><li>How does the author organize the article “Lighter Than Air”? </li></ul><ul><li>A. by explaining why hot-air ballooning is preferable to gas ballooning </li></ul><ul><li>B. by describing the main parts of gas and hot-air balloons </li></ul><ul><li>C. by comparing gas ballooning and hot-air ballooning </li></ul><ul><li>D. by listing the effects of “lighter than air” gases </li></ul>Distracters: Sometime the passage is not always explaining someone or a(n) object
  27. 27. Author's Organization <ul><li>How does the author organize the article “Lighter Than Air”? </li></ul><ul><li>A. by explaining why hot-air ballooning is preferable to gas ballooning </li></ul><ul><li>B. by describing the main parts of gas and hot-air balloons </li></ul><ul><li>C. by comparing gas ballooning and hot-air ballooning </li></ul><ul><li>D. by listing the effects of “lighter than air” gases </li></ul>C: Because its comparing the gas balloon to an hot-air balloon.
  28. 28. Hydrogen Balloons(1) <ul><li>A gas balloon is any balloon that stays aloft due to being filled with a gas less dense than air or メ lighter than air モ (such as helium or hydrogen). A gas balloon may also be called a Charliere for its inventor, Jacques Charles. Today familiar gas balloons include large blimps. Gas balloons can fly higher and further than hot-air balloons, but are more dangerous because they are usually filled with hydrogen gas. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Hydrogen Balloons(1) <ul><li>A gas balloon is any balloon that stays aloft due to being filled with a gas less dense than air or メ lighter than air モ (such as helium or hydrogen). A gas balloon may also be called a Charliere for its inventor, Jacques Charles. Today familiar gas balloons include large blimps. Gas balloons can fly higher and further than hot-air balloons, but are more dangerous because they are usually filled with hydrogen gas. </li></ul>Light Gasses
  30. 30. Hydrogen Balloons(1) <ul><li>A gas balloon is any balloon that stays aloft due to being filled with a gas less dense than air or メ lighter than air モ (such as helium or hydrogen). A gas balloon may also be called a Charliere for its inventor, Jacques Charles. Today familiar gas balloons include large blimps. Gas balloons can fly higher and further than hot-air balloons, but are more dangerous because they are usually filled with hydrogen gas. </li></ul>Light Gasses Gassy Dangers
  31. 31. Hydrogen Balloons(2) <ul><li>Gas ballooning has been popular in Europe, most notably in Germany. Gas balloon clubs exist throughout the country. In the U.S., gas ballooning is not as popular as hot-air ballooning. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Hydrogen Balloons(2) <ul><li>Gas ballooning has been popular in Europe, most notably in Germany. Gas balloon clubs exist throughout the country. In the U.S., gas ballooning is not as popular as hot-air ballooning. </li></ul>Balloons Across The Globe
  33. 33. Hot-Air <ul><li>A hot air balloon gets its lift from heating air using propane fuel. Hot air balloons are based on the basic scientific principle that warmer air rises in cooler air. The lower density of heated air inside than the colder outside keeps the balloon afloat. A standard hot air balloon is called a Montgolfiere balloon and relies solely on the bouyancy of hot air provided by a burner contained below the envelope (the fabric bag, or メ balloon モ ). </li></ul>
  34. 34. Hot-Air <ul><li>A hot air balloon gets its lift from heating air using propane fuel. Hot air balloons are based on the basic scientific principle that warmer air rises in cooler air. The lower density of heated air inside than the colder outside keeps the balloon afloat. A standard hot air balloon is called a Montgolfiere balloon and relies solely on the bouyancy of hot air provided by a burner contained below the envelope (the fabric bag, or メ balloon モ ). </li></ul>Montgolfiere Balloon
  35. 35. Balloons in your City
  36. 36. Balloons in your City <ul><li>Welcome, Balloon Fans! </li></ul>
  37. 37. Question 1 <ul><li>The section “Ballooning Over Broward” is different from the other sections of the artcle </li></ul>

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