Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Weimar in the golden twenties
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Weimar in the golden twenties

2,463

Published on

Geschiedenis: Weimar in the Golden Twenties …

Geschiedenis: Weimar in the Golden Twenties

I use my own material and material from colleagues who have presented their work also on internet.


I claim nothing. This is merely educational fair use.

Educational fair use:

"the fair use of a copyrighted work (...) for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright"

But I claim nothing, All trademarks, works and images used are properties of their respective owners. If I violate any form of copyright please contact me and I will give credit.

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,463
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Weimar Republic in the “Golden Twenties” - Foreign Policy - History of Germany Lecture 8
  • 2. Schedule
    • Introduction
    • The Treaty of Versailles
    • Cooperative revisionism
    • Diplomatic successes
    • Conclusion
  • 3. Gustav Stresemann (1878-1929), ca. 1920
  • 4. Schedule
    • Introduction
    • The Treaty of Versailles
    • Cooperative revisionism
    • Diplomatic successes
    • Conclusion
  • 5. The Treaty of Versailles
    • War guilt
    • Reduction of Reichswehr to 100,000 men and restrictions on modern weapon systems
    • Loss of territory to France, Belgium, Poland, Denmark
    • Demilitarisation of the Rhineland
    • Reparations
  • 6. ARTICLE 231. “ The Allied and Associated Governments affirm and Germany accepts the responsibility of Germany and her allies for causing all the loss and damage to which the Allied and Associated Governments and their nationals have been subjected as a consequence of the war imposed upon them by the aggression of Germany and her allies.” Treaty of Versailles
  • 7.  
  • 8. Germania tied to the stake Postcard directed against the Treaty of Versailles, about 1920
  • 9.                                                                                                            Matthias Erzberger 1921 Walther Rathenau 1921 Political Assassinations
  • 10. Schedule
    • Introduction
    • The Treaty of Versailles
    • Cooperative revisionism
    • Diplomatic successes
    • Conclusion
  • 11. Revisionism
    • All German political parties wanted to revise the Treaty of Versailles
    • Differences concerned extent of revision
    • Differences on which strategy should be applied: policy of patient negotiation including integration into international order or aggressive policy of strength?
    • Should use of force be allowed?
  • 12. Who will bring the Ostmark back? Poster of the DNVP for the elections to the National Assembly, 1919
  • 13. Target “Occupation of the Ruhr” with anti-French propaganda, after 1923, wood
  • 14. Schedule
    • Introduction
    • The Treaty of Versailles
    • Cooperative revisionism
    • Diplomatic successes
    • Conclusion
  • 15. Stresemann – a good European?
    • Conciliatory cooperative policy towards France and Britain
    • Germany joins League of Nations
    • International recognition Nobel Peace Prize (together with Aristide Briand)
    • Economic pressure on Poland
    • Germany as advocate of rights of German minorities in Eastern Europe
    • Letter to Crown Prince: readjustment of Eastern borders and liberation of Germany from foreign domination
    • Illegal military cooperation with Soviet Russia
  • 16. Germany’s integration in European policy
    • Reparations: Dawes plan 1924, Young plan 1929
    • Locarno Treaty: Germany guarantees Western borders (but not Eastern borders) – early withdrawal of French and Belgian troops from Ruhr 1924/25
    • Germany joins League of Nations in 1926, gets seat in council
    • Treaty of Berlin with Soviet Union: neutrality if one state is attacked
    • Kellogg-Briand Pact in 1929: renounces use of force
  • 17. Locarno…is the achievement of lasting peace on the Rhine, guaranteed by the formal renunciation of force by the two great neighboring nations and also by the commitment of other states to come to the aid of the victim of an act of aggression in violation of this treaty…It can and it ought to be the basis for a general cooperative effort among these nations to spread peace wherever their material power and moral influence reach.” Gustav Stresemann 1926
  • 18. Schedule
    • Introduction
    • The Treaty of Versailles
    • Cooperative revisionism
    • Diplomatic successes
    • Conclusion
  • 19. Was Stresemann successful?
    • Foreign Policy
    • Reparation payments now clear
    • American investment
    • Beginning of reconciliation with France and integration into European policies
    • Early withdrawal of French troops from Ruhr and later from Rhineland
    • No territorial revisions in the East
    • Effects on domestic policy
    • German public opinion violently against amount and length of payments
    • German financial system dependent on American money
    • Public opinion: Germany gained too little by renouncing claim to Alsace-Lorraine
    • Disappointment
    Without doubt constructive and successful foreign policy in longer term perspective, in short-term perspective was not supported by German public opinion – was not able to give additional legitimacy to Weimar democracy

×