Intecon micro review 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Intecon micro review 1

  • 1,798 views
Uploaded on

Micro review 1 for International Economics' students: the simple market model (pdf version). The notes for each slide can be read below. However, some of them were chopped off. So they are not......

Micro review 1 for International Economics' students: the simple market model (pdf version). The notes for each slide can be read below. However, some of them were chopped off. So they are not always complete. Still, short of having a computer with PowerPoint, this is good.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,798
On Slideshare
1,798
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. This  video  clip  reviews  the  microeconomic  concepts  that  we’ll  be  using  in  our  course.  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  Mee:ng  Notes  (1/22/12  08:53)  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  In  our  interna:onal  economics  course.   1  
  • 2. The  review  includes  two  items:  (1)  the  mechanics  of  the  simple  model  of  a  compe::ve  market  that  economists  use  and  (2)  the  underpinnings  of  the  conven:onal  choice  theory  –  both  collec:ve  and  individual.       2  
  • 3. First  off,  what  is  a  market?        For  our  purposes  here,  we’ll  view  a  market  as  a  bunch  of  people  trading  a  good  on  a  voluntary  basis.    The  good  defines  the  market.    If  the  good  is  oranges,  then  it  is  a  market  for  oranges.        Markets  are  social  structures  –  people  rela:ng  to  one  another  in  certain  ways  (in  this  case,  acknowledging  and  respec:ng  their  mutual  property  and  coopera:ng  with  one  another  via  trade).    For  more  on  this,  see  my  slides  on  Coopera:on  &  Social  Structures.    At  this  point,  we  make  the  assump:on  that  this  market  is  compe::ve.    By  this  we  mean,  first,  that  the  good  is  homogeneous.    There  are  no  differences  in  the  quality  or  characteris:cs  of  the  good.    Say  it  is  oranges.    They  are  generic  oranges.    For  a  buyer,  it  doesn’t  maVer  who  supplies  the  oranges,  because  they  all  look  and  taste  and  smell  the  same.    And  second,  to  say  that  the  market  is  compe::ve  is  to  say  that  there  are  many  buyers  and  many  sellers,  so  no  par:cular  buyer  or  seller  has  “market  power”  –  i.e.  the  ability  to  manipulate  the  price  individually.    And  since  there  are  many  and  the  good  is  the  same,  the  sellers  cannot  differen:ate  the  good  or  form  coali:ons.    Neither  can  the  buyers.    Basically,  it’s  just  a  bunch  of  individual  buyers  and  sellers  trying  to  do  the  best  they  can  for  each  of  them  individually  without  regard  for  the     3  
  • 4. We  split  the  people  into  two  groups  –  one  group,  we  call  the  buyers.    These  people  have  money  and  want  the  good.    The  second  group  is  the  sellers.    These  people  have  the  good,  but  they  want  the  money.    The  two  groups  meet  and  make  the  market  by  nego:a:ng  prices  at  which  they  are  willing  to  trade.    There  will  be  a  single  price  in  this  market,  at  which  all  buyers  will  buy  the  good  and  all  sellers  will  sell  the  good.    Once  the  two  groups  agree  on  a  price  such  that  the  buyers  want  to  buy  the  same  amount  of  the  good  that  the  sellers  wish  to  sell  –  and  we  call  that  the  “market  equilibrium”  –  the  deal  is  made,  they  shake  hands,  sellers  hand  the  good  to  the  buyers,  buyers  pay  the  sellers  the  money,  and  each  group  goes  home  happier  or  at  least  not  less  happy  than  they  were  before.    Remember:  it  is  a  voluntary  transac:on.    If  people  felt  that  trading  made  them  less  happy,  then  why  would  they  do  it  voluntarily?    We  construct  the  model  in  the  following  way:  First,  we  study  the  behavior  of  buyers.    We  call  that  the  demand  side.    Second,  we  study  the  behavior  of  the  sellers.    We  call  that  the  supply  side.    Third,  we  put  the  two  together.    We  call  that  equilibrium.    Fourth,  we  study  how  equilibrium  is  aVained.    Fi]h,  we  shock  the  model  by  making  some  or  other  factor  (other  than  price)  affect  the  behavior  of  buyers  or  sellers  or  both,  and  see  what  the  model  predicts.    This  is  the  way  in  which  we  test  the  model.    If  the  predic:ons  of  the  model  match  what  we  observe  in  reality,  then  –  and  to  that  extent  –  we  deem  the  model  as  reliable  and  use  it  in  our  prac:cal  applica:ons.       4  
  • 5. Demand.    The  ques:on  we  pose  here  is:  What  makes  buyers  buy  more  (or  less)  of  a  good?    There  are  many  factors.    Let  me  limit  my  list  to  a  few  of  these  factors:      Price  is  the  first  one.    And  in  the  graphic  model  that  we  use,  this  is  the  variable  that  is  explicitly  included  in  the  analysis.    Economists  say  that  this  variable,  price,  and  the  quan:ty  traded  (demanded  and  supplied)  are  the  *endogenous*  variables.    Other  variables,  which  are  not  explicitly  visible  in  the  analysis,  are  called  *exogenous*.    It  doesn’t  mean  that  we  don’t  care  about  them.    We  have  ways  to  reflect  the  impact  of  changes  on  those  variables  on  our  market  model  –  on  price  and  quan:ty.    But  our  liVle  model  cannot  explain  *why*  they  change.    We  are  just  going  to  assume,  whenever  we  may  deem  that  convenient,  that  these  variables  change  and  then  register  the  effect  of  those  changes  on  price  and  quan:ty.    Price  maVers  here,  because  –  and  this  seems  like  a  reasonable  assump:on  to  make,  since  it  appears  to  match  what  we  observe  in  the  world  –  if  the  price  is  higher,  buyers  will  tend  to  buy  less  of  the  good.    If,  on  the  other  hand,  the  price  is  lower,  buyers  will  tend  to  buy  more.    So,  there’s  a  nega:ve  or  inverse  rela:onship  between  price  and  quan:ty  demanded  –  the  quan:ty  that  buyers  wish  to  buy  given  all  other  things.     5  
  • 6. Here’s  the  graph  of  the  demand  rela:onship.          This  graph  (the  curve  or  line)  shows  directly  the  rela:onship  between  the  quan:ty  demanded  for  the  good  and  the  price  of  the  good.    It  is  a  nega:ve  rela:onship.    That  is  why  the  slope  of  the  line  is  nega:ve.    The  line  is  downward  sloping.    Now,  for  simplicity,  I’m  drawing  it  as  a  straight  line.    Real  demand  lines,  if  we  are  able  to  es:mate  them  (and  there  are  difficul:es  to  es:mate  them  empirically),  don’t  need  to  be  straight  lines.    This  is  a  simplifica:on,  but  it  is  a  simplifica:on  that  helps  us  clarify  things  nicely.    Note  that  in  this  graph,  we  can  only  show  two  variables  explicitly  or  directly.    As  I  said,  the  two  variables  we  care  most  about  are  the  price  and  the  quan:ty  traded.    So  the  graph  only  shows  the  link  between  price  and  quan:ty  explicitly.      When  we  consider  the  change  in  the  price  of  the  good  and  then  the  reac:on  of  buyers,  then  we  say  that  we  are  “moving  along”  the  demand  line  or  demand  curve.        Let  me  note  that  we  are  drawing  the  demand  curve  as  a  straight  line  for  convenience  only.    There  is  no  reason  why  an  actual  demand  curve  would  be  linear.     6  
  • 7. When  other  factors  (not  explicitly  indicated  -­‐-­‐  the  factors  that  we  listed  before:  income,  tastes,  other  prices,  expecta:ons)…  when  those  factors  change,  that  has  an  effect  on  the  whole  demand  line.      The  demand  line  shi]s.    For  example,  suppose  that  this  is  the  market  for  oranges  and  the  price  of  apples  increases.    Then,  as  a  result,  the  en:re  demand  line  for  oranges  may  shi]  to  the  right  –  indica:ng  that  for  each  given  price,  buyers  are  willing  to  buy  more  oranges  due  to  the  higher  price  of  apples.    This  is  called  a  rightward  *shi]*  of  the  demand  line.    It  is  easy  to  see  that  the  effect  of  changes  in  the  other  variables  listed  (variables  other  than  price  and  the  quan:ty  demanded)  can  be  shown  in  this  graph  as  a  shi]  of  the  demand  line.    Now,  just  by  looking  at  the  shi]  in  the  diagram,  we  may  not  be  able  to  know  what  cause  that  shi].    So,  we’ll  need  to  add  separate  informa:on  to  our  diagram  so  that  we  know  why  the  graph,  the  demand  line  shi]ed.   7  
  • 8. Let  us  now  consider  …  supply.    This  is  the  descrip:on  of  how  the  sellers  (the  other  side  of  the  market)  behave.    The  ques:on  here  is:  What  makes  sellers  sell  more  (or  less)  of  a  good?    There  are  also  many  factors.    These  are  a  few  important  ones:      Price  is,  again,  the  first  one.    The  higher  the  price,  the  more  of  the  good  the  sellers  would  want  to  sell,  other  things  equal.    Suppose  that  the  producers  and,  more  generally,  the  sellers  of  the  good  are  business  people.    They  are  offering  the  good  for  sale,  because  they  want  to  make  a  profit.  The  profit  they  obtain  per  unit  of  the  good  is  the  difference  between  the  price  of  the  good  and  the  cost  of  the  good  for  them.    Let  us  define  here  the  cost  of  the  good  as  the  minimum  price  at  which  the  sellers  are  willing  to  sell  the  good.    Clearly,  if  the  cost  of  the  good  is  given,  the  higher  the  price,  the  higher  their  profit.    On  the  other  hand,  if  the  price  of  the  good  is  given,  then  the  lower  the  cost  of  the  good,  the  higher  the  profit.    Given  the  price  of  the  good,  its  cost  is  going  to  be  their  main  considera:on  when  deciding  how  much  of  the  good  to  sell.    What  is  the  cost:  Well,  if  they  are  the  producers,  they  need  to  assemble  the  inputs  required  to  produce  the  good  and  pay     8  
  • 9. Here’s  the  graph  of  the  supply  rela:onship.          This  graph  (the  curve  or  line)  shows  directly  the  rela:onship  between  the  quan:ty  supplied  of  the  good  and  the  price  of  the  good.    It  is  a  posi:ve  rela:onship.  The  supply  curve  or  line  is  upward  sloping.    For  simplicity,  I  draw  it  as  a  straight  line.    Real  supply  lines,  also  hard  to  es:mate  empirically,  don’t  need  to  be  straight  lines.    But  we  are  simplifying  maVers.    You  will  note  that  the  supply  curve  here  is  also  a  straight  line,  just  like  the  demand  curve  was  a  straight  line.    Again,  this  is  for  convenience  only.    There  is  no  reason  why  an  actual  demand  or  supply  curves  would  be  linear.      Now,  again,  if  we  are  studying  the  change  in  the  price  of  the  good  and  how  sellers  react  to  it,  we  are  “moving  along”  the  supply  curve.       9  
  • 10. When  the  other  factors  change,  the  supply  curve  shi]s  en:rely.    Suppose  that  this  is  the  market  for  oranges  and  the  price  of  labor  decreases  (say,  there  is  high  unemployment  in  the  area  and  workers  have  to  accept  lower  wages).    Then,  as  a  result,  the  en:re  supply  curve  to  the  right  –  indica:ng  that  for  each  given  price,  sellers  are  willing  to  sell  more  oranges  due  to  the  lower  cost  of  labor.    This  is  called  a  rightward  *shi]*  of  the  supply  curve.        And  when  any  of  the  other  factors  may  change,  we  can  do  something  similar  to  register  that  change  and  its  effect  on  the  market  in  our  diagram.   10  
  • 11. We  are  now  ready  to  put  the  demand  and  the  supply  sides  together.    In  the  diagram,  we  show  now  the  demand  and  the  supply  curves.    Demand  is  downward  sloping.    Supply  is  upward  sloping.    As  a  result,  they  cross  at  a  point.    Let  us  examine  the  point  where  they  cross.    The  demand  curve  shows  the  different  quan::es  of  the  good  that  buyers  wish  to  buy  at  different  prices  (given  the  economic  environment).    The  supply  curve  shows  the  different  quan::es  of  the  good  that  sellers  wish  to  sell  at  different  prices  (again,  given  the  economic  environment).    The  point  where  the  two  curves  cross  is  a  price  and  a  quan:ty  –  the  price  at  which  the  quan:ty  demand  and  the  quan:ty  supplied  are  equal.    At  this  price,  buyers  and  sellers  agree  on  the  quan:ty  they  wish  to  trade.    We  call  it  equilibrium,  because  if  nothing  changes  in  the  economic  environment,  then  there  is  no  reason  why  buyers  or  sellers  may  want  to  be  somewhere  else  rather  than  at  that  point.    Consider  the  case  where  the  price  is  higher  than  the  equilibrium  price  –  say  about  here.    Note  then  that  the  quan:ty  that  buyers  want  to  buy  falls  short  of  the  quan:ty  that  sellers  want  to  sell.    As  a  consequence,  there  is  no  deal.    There  is  a  gap  between  the  quan:ty  demanded  and  the  quan:ty  supplied.    Economists  call  that  gap  a  glut.    It     11  
  • 12. Let  us  now  do  the  algebra.    The  demand  equa:on  is  this  one:  P  =  12  -­‐  .8  Qd     where  12  is  the  ver:cal  intercept  and  -­‐0.8  is  the  slope.     The  intercept  or  any  price  above  it  would  discourage  buyers  from  buying  the  good.     No  buyer  would  pay  that  much  for  the  good.  The  slope  (.8)  indicates  the  drop  in  the   price  that  would  make  buyers  buy  one  extra  unit  of  the  good.     Note  that  the  ver:cal  axis  shows  you  how  much  the  buyers  value  one  unit  of  the   good.    It  indicates  how  much  they  benefit  from  it,  since  they  would  only  pay  the   price  for  it  if  they  felt  that  the  benefit  received  compensates  them  properly.           12  
  • 13. And  here  is  the  supply  equa:on:  P  =  2  +  .2  Qs,  where  2  is  the  ver:cal  intercept  and  0.25  is  the  slope.    At  the  intercept  or  any  price  below  it,  no  seller  would  sell  any  of  the  good.    The  slope  indicates  the  increase  in  the  price  that  would  lead  sellers  to  sell  one  extra  unit  of  the  good.    It  is  important  to  note  here  that  the  ver:cal  axis  also  shows  how  much  the  sellers  value  the  good.    It  indicates  how  much  the  good  costs  the  sellers,  since  they  would  only  sell  it  if  they  feel  compensated  for  such  cost.     13  
  • 14. We  have  a  system  of  two  linear  equa:ons.    The  demand  has  to  sa:sfy  the  rule  P  =  12  -­‐  .8  Qd  and  the  supply  the  rule  that  P  =  2  +  .2  Qs.    In  equilibrium,  the  price  that  buyers  pay  is  the  same  price  that  the  sellers  receive.    And  the  quan:ty  that  the  buyers  want  to  buy  is  the  quan:ty  that  the  sellers  want  to  sell.    In  other  words,  the  equilibrium  price  and  quan:ty  are  the  values  of  P  and  Q  that  solve  the  two  equa:ons  simultaneously.    Let  us  solve  the  system  algebraically  now.    Since  the  price  has  to  be  the  same  for  both  buyers  and  sellers,  then  we  can  make  the  RHS  of  these  equa:ons  equal  and  then  solve  for  Q,  which  is  also  only  one  Q,  both  quan:ty  demanded  and  quan:ty  supplied.    A]er  doing  the  algebra,  we  find  that  the  quan:ty  that  both  buyers  and  sellers  want  to  trade  is  10  units  of  the  good.    By  plugging  this  value  of  Q  in  any  of  the  original  equa:ons,  we  find  the  equilibrium  price,  which  is  $4/unit.    I  do  the  subs:tu:on  with  both  equa:ons,  demand  and  supply,  to  show  that  the  result  must  be  the  same.  …  The  equilibrium  is  a  pair  of  numbers,  a  price  and  a  quan:ty:  10  units  of  the  good  and  $4/unit.       14  
  • 15. Let  us  use  now  the  model  for  its  prac:cal  purpose.    We  need  it  to  predict  the  response  of  the  market  to  changes  in  the  economic  environment.        Say,  for  example,  that  we  want  to  know  the  effect  on  the  market  (on  its  Q*  and  P*)  of  a  new  sales  tax  by  of  $2/unit  of  the  good.    Note  that  the  same  effect  would  result  from  any  other  change  in  the  economic  environment  leading  to  a  le]ward  shi]  of  the  supply  curve  of  the  same  size.    The  result  is  a  new  equilibrium.    A  higher  price  and  a  smaller  quan:ty.    I’ll  leave  up  to  you  to  consider  what  happens  to  the  equilibrium  price  and  quan:ty  if  the  supply  curve  shi]s  to  the  right  instead.    Also,  what  happens  to  the  market  (to  Q*  and  P*)  if  the  supply  curve  does  not  move,  but  the  demand  curve  shi]s  to  the  right  and  le]?    Play  with  the  model  un:l  you  feel  comfortable  enough  understanding  its  mechanics  and  implica:ons.   15  
  • 16. Let  us  now  do  the  algebra  for  the  new  condi:ons  in  the  market.    The  demand  equa:on  stays  the  same.    But  the  supply  curve  has  a  new  –  higher  –  intercept:    The  supply  equa:on  is  now  P  =  4  +  .2  Qs.    Let  us  solve  the  new  system  for  P*  and  Q*.    Again,  since  the  price  has  to  be  the  same  for  both  buyers  and  sellers,  then  we  can  make  the  RHS  of  these  equa:ons  equal  and  then  solve  for  Q,  which  is  also  only  one  Q,  both  quan:ty  demanded  and  quan:ty  supplied.    We  find  that  the  quan:ty  that  both  buyers  and  sellers  want  to  trade  is  8  units  of  the  good.        Again,  we  plug  this  value  of  Q  in  any  of  the  original  equa:ons  to  find  the  equilibrium  price,  which  is  now  $5.6/unit.    I  do  this  subs:tu:on  in  both  equa:ons,  demand  and  supply,  to  show  again  that  the  result  is  the  same.    The  new  equilibrium  is  8  units  of  the  good  and  $5.6/unit.       16  
  • 17. 17  
  • 18. 18  
  • 19. Suppose  the  price  in  the  market  is  $4/unit.    The  amount  that  buyers  will  buy  at  that  price  is  10  units.    The  buyers’  total  benefit  (so-­‐called  “consumer”  benefit)  is  the  area  under  the  demand  curve  and  bound  by  the  quan:ty:  10  units.    Now,  the  buyers  spend  in  the  good:  P  Q  =  ($4/unit)  (10  units)  =  $40.    They  receive  the  10  units  of  the  good  that  yields  for  them  the  total  benefit.    However,  a  por:on  of  the  total  benefit  –  the  rectangle  represen:ng  their  expenditure  –  is  not  free.    They  pay  for  that.    S:ll,  there  is  the  triangle  above  the  expenditure  rectangle  for  which  buyers  pay  nothing.    It  is  their  net  benefit  or  “consumer  surplus.”    It  is  the  welfare  that  buyers  receive  for  free  from  the  amount  of  the  good  they  buy  from  the  sellers.    They  receive  this  net  benefit  or  “consumer  surplus”  because  the  market  exists  –  because  there  is  another  side  to  the  market,  because  there  are  sellers  willing  to  cooperate  or  trade  with  them.    This  is  the  source  of  the  consumer  surplus.    The  consumer  surplus  is  represented  by  the  area  of  that  triangle.    To  calculate  the  area,  we  use  the  formula  (b  h)/2.    In  this  case,  the  base  is  10  units  and  the  height  is  the  intercept  of  the  demand  curve  minus  the  price  in  the  market,  which  is  $4/unit.    Therefore,  it  is  12-­‐4  =  8,  mul:plied  by  10,  that  is  80,  and  80  divided  by  2  is  40.    Note  that  the  units  are  just  dollars:  $40.    The  values  on  the  ver:cal  axis  are  prices:  $/unit.    So  $12/unit  minus  $4/unit  =  $8/unit.    Now  when  you  mul:ply  $/unit  :mes  units,  the  units  cancel  out,  and  you  obtain  $,  just  plain  dollars.     19  
  • 20. 20  
  • 21. Let  us  now  calculate  the  producer  surplus.    Again,  if  the  price  in  the  market  is  $4/unit.    The  amount  that  sellers  will  sell  at  that  price  is  10  units.  Remember  that  the  height  of  the  supply  curve  indicates  the  lowest  price  that  sellers  ask  for  one  unit  of  the  good,  and  that  is  precisely  the  cost  of  the  good  for  them.    The  sellers’  total  receipts  or  revenues  are  P  Q  =  (4)  (10)  =  $40.    That  is  represented  by  this  rectangle.    The  area  below  the  supply  curve  and  bound  by  the  quan:ty:  10  units  is  the  cost  for  the  producers.  Note  that  the  sellers’  revenues  P  Q,  $40,  are  more  than  the  sellers’  cost.    The  difference  of  R  –  C  =  profit.    The  profit  is  also  called  the  “producer  surplus.”    The  consumer  surplus  is  represented  by  the  area  of  this  triangle.    Again,  the  area  is  (b  h)/2.    In  this  case,  the  base  is  10  units  and  the  height  is  the  market  price,  $4/unit,  minus  the  intercept  of  the  supply  curve,  $2/unit.    The  height  is  then  4-­‐2  =  $2/unit.    Therefore,  the  producer  surplus  is  (10)  (2)  =  20,  divided  by  2:  $10.      So,  the  net  welfare  benefit  of  the  sellers,  their  profit  or  producer  surplus,  is  a  measure  of  the  welfare  of  sellers  in  the  market  –  something  they  receive  for  free,  because  the  market  exists.    It  is  calculated  in  dollars.    It’s  $10.   21  
  • 22. The  total  surplus  or  the  net  welfare  benefit  that  the  buyers  and  sellers  receive  altogether  is  the  sum  of  the  consumer  and  the  producer  surpluses.   22  
  • 23. In  other  words,  the  total  surplus  is  equal  to  $40  +  $10  =  $50.    To  repeat:  This  is  a  measure  of  the  net  welfare  benefits  that  both  buyers  and  sellers  together  receive  as  a  result  of  the  existence  of  the  market,  which  is  to  say,  as  a  result  of  their  coopera:ng  with  each  other.    It’s  the  fruits  of  their  coopera:on,  which  –  in  this  par:cular  case  –  takes  the  form  of  trade.    And  to  keep  the  :me  of  this  videos  short,  there’s  no  summary.    You  can  go  back  and  replay  the  parts  that  you  may  need  to  study  more  carefully.    I  hope  this  was  helpful  to  you.    I’ll  see  you  in  class.   23