Web2 cc energy_waste_16.10.2013_ss

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Web2 cc energy_waste_16.10.2013_ss

  1. 1. Creu Cymru Emergence-Eginiad Pilot Energy and waste management Webinar starting shortly……
  2. 2. Creu Cymru Emergence-Eginiad Pilot Energy and waste management 16th October 2013 Catherine Langabeer & Lucy Latham Julie’s Bicycle
  3. 3. Welcome • Who’s on the webinar with us today?
  4. 4. Your control panel - features
  5. 5. Today’s agenda • • • • • • • Pilot Goals Drivers Energy Management: Why? How? What? First 5 steps Waste Management: Why? How? What? First 5 steps Discussion
  6. 6. Pilot goals • • • • • • • • • Venue CEOs taken a leadership role Successful engagement of staff, boards, LAs, etc All venues taken action – from basic to more challenging Carbon baseline for all venues with data Environmental policies and action plans Shared understanding of who is doing what New channels of communication and cooperation created Online knowledge bank and community of best practice Catalysed a shift in organisational culture and behaviour
  7. 7. Why? Drivers for change Climate change adaptation Policy and legislation Business case Commodity pricing and resource scarcity Reputation
  8. 8. More than environmental • Energy efficiency refurbishments -> Improved comfort for staff and visitors • Energy efficiency refurbishments -> Increasing potential use of venue spaces e.g. new hires • Improved building controls and management -> Making building more adaptive, reducing building costs • Renewable energy infrastructure -> Reducing costs and reliance on conventional energy
  9. 9. Energy: Why? • • • • • Rising fossil fuel prices Reliability of future energy supplies Improved energy efficiency to reduce costs Demonstrate efficient business planning to funders Civic leadership (public image)
  10. 10. Energy: How? • Avoid: do things differently to avoid using energy e.g. using natural ventilation instead of air-conditioning, holding events outdoors in summer. • Reduce: reduce your energy consumption by improving efficiency e.g. use more efficient lighting. • Replace: change from fossil-fuel based energy to low or zero carbon energy sources e.g. switching to a truly “green” tariff , and generating renewable energy on-site.
  11. 11. Energy: What?
  12. 12. Toolkit Example Actions • • • • • • Improving monitoring: Install sub-meters to identify energy use in specific areas Buildings management and fabric: Adjust controls using timers and thermostats to ensure heating, cooling and lighting systems switch on and off according to occupancy periods and building zone use. Heating and hot water systems: Reduce the thermostats of any immersion boilers to 60C. Ventilation and air-conditioning: If you have a significant ventilation system with cooling motors, fit a modern variable-speed drive (VSD) or a 2 or 3-stage fan speed control. Energy supply and optimisation: Buy ‘green tariff’ electricity (if you procure your own energy supply), or switch to a 100% renewable energy provider such as Good Energy, Ecotricity or Green Energy Lighting: Install PIR motion sensors and daylight sensors.
  13. 13. 5 First Steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Conduct a walk around energy survey Review your data collection and building systems Calculate your energy baseline and input into IG Tool Prioritise your impacts Engage with your staff – start the conversation
  14. 14. Step 1: Conduct a walk around energy survey • Walk around your building • Record all the systems using energy (e.g. ventilation, heating, lighting, air-conditioning) • Record the zones these systems are controlling (e.g. in performance/exhibition areas, foyers, offices, bars) • Review your meters- How many? What utility do they provide? Where do they serve?
  15. 15. Step 2: Review your data collection and building management • Review your energy data: - What is recorded? - Who records it? - How often? - When and how is it reported? - What are the barriers e.g. accessing meters, non-monthly bills • What building systems do you have in place? e.g. - Sub-meters - Smart meters - BMS (building management system) - Monitoring software
  16. 16. Step 3: Calculate your energy baseline • Create a baseline of annual energy consumption (kWh), cost and carbon emissions for each utility. Aggregate data by month (where possible), using information drawing from meter reads (best practice) or bills (good practice) • Verify actual energy use against invoiced consumption data • Consider times of energy use e.g. day versus night, winter versus summer, holidays, production/rehearsal timings etc. • Familiarise yourself with the Julie’s Bicycle IG Tool for venues – enter your annual data once you have it
  17. 17. Julie’s Bicycle Industry Green (IG) Tool
  18. 18. Step 4: Prioritise your impacts • Identify high energy users e.g. stage lighting, HVAC system etc. • Identify areas of poor efficiency e.g. single glazing, old boilers etc. • Identify any areas of poor thermal comfort Consider: • What do you have control over/can easily influence? • What areas do you consider quick/cheap wins? • Any funded projects in the pipeline?
  19. 19. Step 5: Engage with your staff – start the conversation • Senior management buy-in • Staff perceptions of thermal comfort • Staff awareness/interest in energy use and conservation • Identify need for behaviour change campaign • Roles and responsibilities: new roles?
  20. 20. Energy monitoring “kit” Plug in meter Clamp on meter Wattson energy display monitor
  21. 21. Further reading • Carbon Trust Technology and Energy Management publications • SAVE ENERGY Energy audit methodologies and procedures (2010) • Julie’s Bicycle Energising Culture (2012)
  22. 22. Waste: Why? • • • • Throwing things away wastes resources High waste to landfill tax: £72 / tonne Landfill generates methane Runoff from waste as it decomposes may cause pollution. • Incinerating waste causes problems, such as producing toxic substances and air pollution.
  23. 23. Waste: How? • Avoid, reduce, reuse and recycle and work towards zero waste to landfill. • Look at both at what comes in and what goes out • Go systematically through your operations.
  24. 24. Waste: What?
  25. 25. Toolkit Examples • • • • • • Avoiding and reducing waste: Include in your procurement policy a procedure that makes sure you are basing purchasing decisions on accurate information about stock and actual usage. Avoiding and reducing waste: Use tap water in jugs instead of bottled water. Avoiding and reducing waste: Set photocopiers and printers to double-sided copying and printing as default. Reusing and recycling: Use waste paper as notepaper and reuse envelopes and other packaging. Reusing and recycling: Use durable cups, mugs, glasses and cutlery rather than disposable. Reusing and recycling: Use toners and cartridges which have been refilled or remanufactured. Do check that your machines can accept refilled/remanufactured products.
  26. 26. 5 First Steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Calculate your incoming materials and products Review data collection & waste management systems Calculate your waste baseline and input into IG Tool Prioritise your impacts Engage with your staff – start the conversation
  27. 27. Step 1: Calculate your incoming materials and products • Identify the main types and volumes of products and materials you purchase • What stock control systems do you have in place?
  28. 28. Step 2: Review your data collection and waste management systems • Understand your data and systems: - What is recorded? e.g. bin pick-ups V tonnage - Who records it? - How often? - When and how is it reported? - What are the barriers e.g. contractor data • What waste streams do you currently recycle? e.g. paper, plastics, cans, food waste etc.
  29. 29. Step 3: Calculate your waste baseline • Conduct an initial waste audit. Try and get a year’s worth of data, aggregated monthly. • How much is created and from where? • How is your waste currently dealt with? - Landfill - Incineration - Energy from waste incineration - Composting - Recycling • What are the costs?
  30. 30. Step 4: Prioritise your impacts • Using the information learned from ‘Step 1: Calculate your incoming materials and products’, identify areas for reducing overall waste. • Use the initial waste audit, identify recycling improvements e.g. more recycling bins, more waste streams recycled. Consider: • What do you have control over/can easily influence? • What areas do you consider quick/cheap wins? e.g. simple alterations to housekeeping like providing tap water instead of bottled water. • Any funded projects in the pipeline?
  31. 31. Step 5: Engage with your staff – start the conversation • • • • Senior management buy-in Staff awareness/interest in recycling Identify need for behaviour change campaign Roles and responsibilities: new roles?
  32. 32. Further reading • WRAP Business Resource efficiency Resource Hub • Julie’s Bicycle will soon be launching the new version of the Green Arts Marketplace
  33. 33. Discussion • Successes • Good practice • Barriers
  34. 34. Creu Cymru Emergence-Eginiad Pilot – Thanks for joining us! Energy and waste management 16th October 2013 Catherine Langabeer & Lucy Latham Julie’s Bicycle

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