Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
international relation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

international relation

3,039

Published on

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,039
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
102
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. International Relations Week 1 Brendon Tagg [email_address]
  • 2.
  • 3. My view of this course <ul><li>My background </li></ul><ul><li>sociology </li></ul><ul><li>social anthropology </li></ul><ul><li>My view of this course </li></ul><ul><li>arguments not answers </li></ul><ul><li>Balance: accessibility and depth </li></ul>
  • 4. Textbook <ul><li>Baylis, J., S. Smith and P. Owens (2008) The Globalization of World Politics (4th ed.) Oxford: University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>RM 80 (student discount) </li></ul><ul><li>Also journal articles </li></ul>
  • 5. Ethical issues <ul><li>Cultural issues </li></ul><ul><li>constructive criticism </li></ul><ul><li>Critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>consider multiple perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Respectful disagreement </li></ul><ul><li>share different ideas </li></ul>
  • 6. Referencing / plagiarism <ul><li>Please use a recognised referencing style </li></ul><ul><li>- Author, year, publisher/journal, edition, page numbers </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledge other people’s ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Both direct quote and general arguments </li></ul><ul><li>Do not quote Wikipedia etc. in assignments </li></ul>
  • 7. Cell phones / office hours <ul><li>Cell phone off or on silent mode </li></ul><ul><li>Emergencies </li></ul><ul><li>Monday and Wednesday, 10-11am </li></ul><ul><li>Room PA202 (main building) </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
  • 8. Language issues <ul><li>English only (sorry!) </li></ul><ul><li>Support each other, or ask me </li></ul><ul><li>Class rep </li></ul><ul><li>You can keep a copy of the lecture notes </li></ul>
  • 9. Moodle <ul><li>http://elearn.umt.edu.my </li></ul>
  • 10. Topics in this course <ul><li>Globalisation </li></ul><ul><li>Global management </li></ul><ul><li>The League of Nations and the UN </li></ul><ul><li>Regional organisations (e.g. AU, ASEAN) </li></ul><ul><li>Non-state global actors (NGO’s) </li></ul><ul><li>non-profit NGO’s </li></ul><ul><li>Trans-national corporations </li></ul>
  • 11. Topics in this course <ul><li>Major theories of International Relations </li></ul><ul><li>Idealism vs. Realism </li></ul><ul><li>Dependency theory </li></ul><ul><li>Just War theory </li></ul>
  • 12. Topics in this course <ul><li>Specific issues </li></ul><ul><li>Development aid </li></ul><ul><li>Arms race and nuclear proliferation </li></ul><ul><li>Nationalism and ethnic conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><li>Human rights / refugees </li></ul><ul><li>The environment </li></ul><ul><li>Terrorism </li></ul>
  • 13. Assessment <ul><li>Mid-semester test 30% week 6 (30 Aug?) </li></ul><ul><li>Group presentations 30% weeks 10 and 11 </li></ul><ul><li>Final exam 40% </li></ul>
  • 14. What is globalisation? <ul><li>“ By globalization we simply mean the process of increasing interconnected-ness between societies such that events in one part of the world more and more have effects on peoples and societies far away” (Baylis, Smith and Owens 2008: 8). </li></ul>
  • 15. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 16. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 17. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 18. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 19. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 20. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 21. What is globalisation? <ul><li>observed throughout world </li></ul><ul><li>non-state actors </li></ul><ul><li>global technologies </li></ul><ul><li>global reactions </li></ul><ul><li>no ordinary buildings </li></ul><ul><li>90 countries’ citizens </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for attacks </li></ul>
  • 22. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 23. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 24. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 25. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 26. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 27. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 28. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 29. Ideas supporting globalisation <ul><li>pace of economic transformation </li></ul><ul><li>communications </li></ul><ul><li>global culture </li></ul><ul><li>world increasingly homogenous </li></ul><ul><li>ideas of time and space </li></ul><ul><li>global political culture </li></ul><ul><li>cosmopolitan culture </li></ul><ul><li>risk culture </li></ul>
  • 30. Ideas refuting globalisation <ul><li>Hirst and Thompson (1996) </li></ul><ul><li>- globalisation just a ‘buzzword’ </li></ul><ul><li>Critique economic aspects of globalisation: </li></ul><ul><li>- current world not that unique </li></ul><ul><li>- few genuine TNCs </li></ul><ul><li>- no shift of finance and capital </li></ul><ul><li>- three blocs dominate </li></ul><ul><li>- regulation is possible </li></ul>
  • 31. Ideas refuting globalisation <ul><li>Hirst and Thompson (1996) </li></ul><ul><li>- globalisation just a ‘buzzword’ </li></ul><ul><li>Critique economic aspects of globalisation: </li></ul><ul><li>- current world not that unique </li></ul><ul><li>- few genuine TNCs </li></ul><ul><li>- no shift of finance and capital </li></ul><ul><li>- three blocs dominate </li></ul><ul><li>- regulation is possible </li></ul>
  • 32. Ideas refuting globalisation <ul><li>Other objections: </li></ul><ul><li>uneven in its effects </li></ul><ul><li>Western imperialism? </li></ul><ul><li>winners and losers </li></ul><ul><li>not necessarily good </li></ul><ul><li>who is held responsible? </li></ul><ul><li>essential paradox </li></ul>
  • 33. Ideas refuting globalisation <ul><li>Other objections: </li></ul><ul><li>uneven in its effects </li></ul><ul><li>Western imperialism? </li></ul><ul><li>winners and losers </li></ul><ul><li>not necessarily good </li></ul><ul><li>who is held responsible? </li></ul><ul><li>essential paradox </li></ul>
  • 34. Questions to think about <ul><li>Is globalisation: </li></ul><ul><li>a new phenomenon in world politics? </li></ul><ul><li>a positive or negative development? </li></ul><ul><li>merely the latest stage of capitalism? </li></ul><ul><li>merely a new form of Western imperialism? </li></ul><ul><li>Does globalisation: </li></ul><ul><li>make the state obsolete? </li></ul><ul><li>make the world more or less democratic? </li></ul><ul><li>make war more of less likely? </li></ul>
  • 35. I.R. vs. World Politics <ul><li>The Globalization of World Politics : An Introduction to International Relations </li></ul><ul><li>Nation : “A group of people who recognize each other as sharing a common identity, with a focus on a homeland” (Baylis et al 2008: 584) </li></ul><ul><li>State : “A legal territory entity composed of a stable population and a government; it possesses a monopoly over the legitimate use of force; its sovereignty is recognized by other states in the international system” (Baylis et al 2008: 587) </li></ul>
  • 36. <ul><li>Nation-states: </li></ul><ul><li>“ a political community in which the state claims legitimacy on the grounds that it represents the nation. The nation-state would exist if nearly all the members of a single nation were organized in a single state, without any other national communities being present. Although the term is widely used, no such entities exist.” (p. 584) </li></ul>
  • 37. Theories of world politics <ul><li>“ A theory is not simply some grand formal model with hypotheses and assumptions. Rather a theory is a kind of simplifying device that allows you to decide which facts matter and which do not.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Baylis, Smith and Owen 2008: 4) </li></ul>
  • 38. Theory <ul><li>Using theory is not optional </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has a theory </li></ul><ul><li>-implicit vs. explicit </li></ul><ul><li>First International Politics Department </li></ul><ul><li>1919, University of Wales </li></ul><ul><li>to find causes of major political problems </li></ul><ul><li>a normative position: how things should be </li></ul>
  • 39. Idealism vs. Realism <ul><li>This view criticised as idealist </li></ul><ul><li>-to engineer the world to how it ought to be </li></ul><ul><li>Opponents preferred a view called realism </li></ul><ul><li>-how the world really is (i.e. not very pleasant) </li></ul><ul><li>Realism has had the upper hand since then </li></ul><ul><li>-may be ‘common-sense’ </li></ul><ul><li>-but it is hardly neutral </li></ul>
  • 40. Idealism <ul><li>Idealism dominant after WWI </li></ul><ul><li>Immanuel Kant </li></ul><ul><li>Woodrow Wilson </li></ul><ul><li>Often now a derogatory term </li></ul>
  • 41. Idealism <ul><li>Result of WWI carnage </li></ul><ul><li>Attempt to abolish war </li></ul><ul><li>Wilson’s Fourteen Points – Versailles (1918) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-449533/Rare-footage-WWI-Gallipoli-battle-unearthed.html </li></ul>
  • 42. Idealism <ul><li>Cosmopolitan ethics </li></ul><ul><li>Fell into disrepute (WWII) </li></ul><ul><li>EH Carr The Twenty Years’ Crisis (1946) </li></ul><ul><li>Seen as naïve and utopian </li></ul><ul><li>Served interests of status quo? </li></ul><ul><li>However liberalism now increasingly popular … </li></ul>
  • 43. Realism <ul><li>Thucydides </li></ul><ul><li>Peloponnesian Wars </li></ul><ul><li>Machiavelli, Hobbes, Weber </li></ul>
  • 44. Realism <ul><li>EH Carr </li></ul><ul><li>Hans Morgenthau </li></ul><ul><li>No harmony between states </li></ul>
  • 45. Realism <ul><li>Grim view of international politics </li></ul><ul><li>Survival rather than progress </li></ul><ul><li>Balance of power </li></ul><ul><li>Both descriptive and prescriptive insights </li></ul>
  • 46. Realism <ul><li>Perpetual peace ‘flies in the face’ of history? </li></ul><ul><li>Human nature is fundamentally flawed </li></ul><ul><li>Conservative? Pessimistic? </li></ul>
  • 47. Realism <ul><li>Dominant since 1945, yet widely criticised </li></ul><ul><li>increased interdependence </li></ul><ul><li>unnecessary assumptions -> neorealism </li></ul>
  • 48. Neo realism <ul><li>Kenneth Waltz </li></ul><ul><li>anarchy is a structural feature </li></ul><ul><li>saves ‘human nature’ from the blame </li></ul><ul><li>But increasingly irrelevant? </li></ul>
  • 49. Liberalism <ul><li>Idealism = extreme Liberalism </li></ul><ul><li>Main themes of Liberalism: </li></ul><ul><li>-humans are perfectible </li></ul><ul><li>-democracy necessary for perfectibility to develop </li></ul><ul><li>-ideas matter (ie. not just power) </li></ul><ul><li>-belief in progress </li></ul><ul><li>States are not the only important actors </li></ul><ul><li>Competing interests within states </li></ul>
  • 50. Liberalism <ul><li>possibility for co-operation between states </li></ul><ul><li>national interests in more than just military terms </li></ul><ul><li>order emerges from laws, agreed norms etc. (not ‘balance of power’) </li></ul><ul><li>In practice, state sovereignty is seriously limited </li></ul>
  • 51. Marxism <ul><li>A third theoretical position </li></ul><ul><li>(after Liberalism, Realism) </li></ul><ul><li>structuralism or world-system theory </li></ul><ul><li>All politics takes place within world capitalist economy </li></ul><ul><li>-social classes the most important actors </li></ul><ul><li>-class forces explain behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>-world economy constrains states’ freedom </li></ul>
  • 52. Marxism <ul><li>Economic, not military terms </li></ul><ul><li>-core, periphery and semi-periphery </li></ul><ul><li>All states have to play by the rules of the international capitalist economy </li></ul>
  • 53. Constructivism <ul><li>http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/margaret-thatcher/6166487/Britain-and-France-feared-fall-of-Berlin-Wall.html </li></ul><ul><li>Developed in 1980s </li></ul><ul><li>human agency had a greater role </li></ul><ul><li>we constantly make and re-make the social world </li></ul>

×