Session three Presentations: Mobile Vendor Economic Policy
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Session three Presentations: Mobile Vendor Economic Policy Session three Presentations: Mobile Vendor Economic Policy Presentation Transcript

  • Street Food in San Francisco Policies, Pitfalls & Possibilities First Annual Street Food Conference August 23, 2010
  • Bureaucratic Smorgasbord  Police Department  Department of Public Health  Fire Department  Planning Department  Department of Public Works  Municipal Transportation Agency
  • Two Main Regulatory Tracks 1. Public Property [SFPD Lead Agency]  Streets  Sidewalks 2. Private Property  Typical parcels (e.g. vacant lots, etc)  Parkland  Plazas
  • Streets and Sidewalks San Francisco Police Department 1. Proximity to schools 2. Pushcarts can’t move 3. “Like” food restrictions 4. Cart size limits
  • Private Property Planning Dept. / Dept. of Public Health  Typical Zoning Controls e.g. those that apply to permanent land uses; no special treatment
  • Context for Street Food Regulation street food benefits residential commercial protectionism protectionism
  • Commercial Protectionism assumptions 1. street vendors are in competition with bricks- and-mortar restaurants 2. zero benefit to commercial clustering / no critical mass
  • street food benefits residential commercial protectionism protectionism
  • Pro p o se d M FF If the site is zoned P If the site is zoned NC, MUD, C, M, or PDR: Is a building involved, or Is a building involved, or when in any other zoning district Is it on-premises more than 6 days/week, or Is it on-premises more than 3 days/week, or Is it within 50’ of an R District? Is it open beyond any principally permitted hours? no yes Is the zoning district subject to the notification requirements of Section 312? no yes Does the MFF: - involve more than 225 square feet of lot area, or - is it located within 50’ of an R District? no yes Subject to Conventional Regulation Approvable with Neighborhood Notice C, M, PDR Districts: generally permitted OTC Approvable OTC NC, MUD’s: process and permissiveness varies Required filings and approximate costs: R Districts: not permitted 3rd party notification materials preparation ($200) Required filings and approximate costs: CCSF notice mailing cost ($300) Renewable 1-year ‘temporary use’ permit ($400) Required filings and approximate costs: Building Permit ($600) Building Permit ($600) ‘temporary use’ permit ($400; first year fee waived) if required by zoning: CU ($1,400) notification ($500) Interm ittent Use Perm anent Use
  • Draft Proposed Regulations Private Property over-the-counter approval if:  less than 250 sf per parcel  doesn’t involve a building  on-site 3 days per week or fewer
  • Draft Proposed Regulations Private Property More detailed review if:  Multiple vendors on a given parcel  Within 50’ of a residential district Current controls apply if:  On-site vending for more than 3 days/week
  • Draft Proposed Regulations Streets and Sidewalks 1. DPW becomes lead agency; Police no longer have a role 2. “Like” foods to be rationalized
  • Street Food in San Francisco Policies, Pitfalls & Possibilities
  • Yes, we still make things right here in San Francisco. SFMade's mission is to build and support a vibrant manufacturing sector in San Francisco that sustains companies producing locally made products, encourages entrepreneurship and innovation, and creates employment opportunities for a diverse local workforce. Kate Sofis Founding Executive Director kate@sfmade.org www.sfmade.org
  • Mobile Vendor Economic Policy Larry Bain Let’s Be Frank
  • Mobile Vendor Economic Policy Matt Cohen SF Cart Project
  • Why I Got Into This…
  • Structural Demands
  • Where to Locate?
  • How Much Should a Cart Cost?
  • Know What This Is?
  • SF Vendors
  • Off the Grid: Fort Mason Center
  • Food Available
  • Getting Creative; Entrepreneurial Notes
  • Where From Here?
  • Places for More Info • www.sfcartproject.com • www.offthegridsf.com • Follow me at twitter.com/sfcarts • matt@offthegridsf.com