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100th Anniversary Moment
1914 – 1932
Kansas City 1914
Page 3
Our Beginning
"I am so delighted to
hear you are thinking
of forming a
Junior League in
Kansas City"
Page 5
World War I
Lurannah Harris and the Canteen
Page 7
Lurannah sailing to Europe and
the entire YMCA Junior League
canteen stationed in G...
Junior League Club House
Page 8
Page 9
”The Junior League has now
passed the years of infancy
and inexperience. The Ladies
bountiful of the past,
scatteri...
Community Focus
Page 10
An Early “Flower Power” Project
Page 11
Community Focus
Page 12
Florence Crittenton Home
Florence Crittenton
Home, 1890 Florence Crittenton
Home, 1918
Crittenton Children’s Center,
2013
FLORENCE CRITTENTON HOME
SPOTLIGHT ON THE COMMUNITY
VIDEO
Partnership with Florence Crittenton Home
•1914 - Volunteers began sewing and cooking classes
•1921 to1929 – Took over ful...
Era of Theater
Children’s Theater
Children’s Theater: The Land of Oz
Children’s Theater:
The Patchwork Girl of Oz
Page 20
Children’s Theater: Snow White
Page 22
Children’s Theater
Page 23
Aladdin
1927
Steadfast Tin Soldier
1928
Children’s Theater:
Mother Goose in Review 1931
Page 24
Children’s Theater
Page 25
Martha Belle Aikins Smith
Page 26
The Junior League Follies
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
1st Follies: Campus Mouser - 1916
Page 30
“The Campus
Mouser is the thing
just now and every
girl who is anyone
at all is ...
Campus Mouser Makes a Splash
Page 31
The Junior League Follies Continue
Page 32
“It is said to
have more pep
and snap than
any amateur
production yet”
Page 33
Follies’ Fashion
Follies in the Roaring Twenties
Page 35
Junior League Follies: 1921 Cast
Page 36
Page 38
Page 39
Mrs. Wingate
Bixby, chairman of
the Junior League
Follies traveled to
New York to confer
with Ned Wayburn
who will...
Page 40
Page 41
JL Horse Show Ball and Cabaret
Follies: Junior League Night Club 1932
Page 43
Page 44
Page 45
Page 46
And now we present
The Junior League
of Kansas City,
Missouri’s
100th Anniversary
Tribute to the
Junior League
Fol...
Junior League of Kansas City, Missouri 100th Anniversary Spotlight 1914-1932
Junior League of Kansas City, Missouri 100th Anniversary Spotlight 1914-1932
Junior League of Kansas City, Missouri 100th Anniversary Spotlight 1914-1932
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Junior League of Kansas City, Missouri 100th Anniversary Spotlight 1914-1932

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  • Florence Crittenton Home and the Junior League – Thoughts from Dr. Gary BakerCrittenton was one of the first major projects taken on by the Junior League after it formed In the 1970s a major fundraising campaign took place to build a new center and almost all of the major board members were also members of the Junior League Thanks to the Junior League’s support of Crittenton countless mothers, children, and families have been helped The new Crittenton Center would not be here today with the leadership and support provided by the Junior League The Junior League is welded deep into the fabric of our community Junior League does amazing work that really helps the community and is full of women with amazing leadership skills
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  • Martha Belle Aikins Smith was very involved with our theatrical productions in the early years. Shown here she was the choreographer for the 1930’s Children’s Theater production of Cinderella. Martha Belle had a dancing school for many years in Kansas City and would not only choreograph for the Children’s Theater, but she would often have a solo dance in another popular Junior League Production…
  • The Junior League Follies. The Follies, one of our earliest fundraisers, were Broadway like - song and dance reviews featuring League Members.
  • Interviewed during the 75th Anniversary, Martha Belle, with a special sparkle in her eyes said, “Way back when I was young, they had the most marvelous shows every year.
  • Capacity audiences would fill the theaters of Kansas City for these Annual Performances. With ticket prices as low as $1, one record breaking show brought in more than $19,000.
  • The debut of the Junior League Follies was a show titled “Campus Mouser” performed at the Garden Theater February of 1916. Campus Mouser brought in a net profit of $2,500.
  • Being in the follies cast was serious business. Local newspapers praised the show and the members performing in the show. Performers were equated to lady artists in coming grand ballets. The Independent said it was a waste of opportunity that the Junior League did not rent the theater for several more performances.
  • Season two brought the first outside director, Dinnie McDonald who had staged a Junior League of Chicago Production. Dinnie also had a dance in the show featured here on the cover of the Independent.
  • The 1916 show featured ladies in a wedding themed number titled “The Wedding Fox-Trot.” complete with flapper dressed flower girls.
  • The Follies were the fashion of the age. Members starring in the production would grace the pages of the Independent in elegant Strauss-Peyton portraits, and local boutiques would feature advertisements geared toward Follies audiences.
  • The Roaring 20’s were a great time for the Follies, but the productions did cause some dissent among members who thought the Follies “detracted from the League’s image, while others felt the shows were half the fun of League membership.”
  • Proceeds from the 1920s Follies benefitted a project known as the Convalescent Home for Sick and Crippled Children, which has developed into today’s Cardiac Center at Children’s Mercy Hospital.
  • The Follies “maintained the high spirits of its members” the fundraisers provided “Ample opportunity for young women, as well as Kansas City society, to participate in hot dancing and heavy drinking – the later despite prohibition.”
  • Much was expected of the performers. Past president, Mrs. McGreevy, recalled that the director of the Follies asked young women to do cartwheels down the aisles. She informed the director that League members were not professional gymnasts, and that doing cartwheels was not a dignified activity.
  • League members would travel to New York to plan productions and meet with paid New York directors who staged the follies. One of these directors was Ned Wayburn, who had directed the Ziegfeld Follies.
  • Martha Belle once said “the Rehearsals were strenuous, but, oh boy, it was fun”. She said the shows were knockouts.
  • The Follies weren’t all work and no play. Several members can be seen here at a luncheon recess during Follies rehearsals for the 1927 show. Members would also pose for advertisements that appeared within the programs.
  • The follies were important, not-to-be missed activities in Kansas City and were also known throughout the years by other names including the Cabaret, which was held in conjunction with Horse shows, and American Royal Festivities.
  • Later shows were also known as the Junior League Nightclub. One Follies star, Gertrude Boyle Ridenour, took the stage name Marion Mansfield and went on to Hollywood to star with Bing Crosby in the movie “Here is my Heart.”
  • The follies ran strong from 1916 through 1934.
  • The popular shows were revived in 1962 for the first full scale production since 1934 with a cast including 150 members. Another revival was presented in 1978.
  • Transcript of "Junior League of Kansas City, Missouri 100th Anniversary Spotlight 1914-1932"

    1. 1. 100th Anniversary Moment 1914 – 1932
    2. 2. Kansas City 1914
    3. 3. Page 3
    4. 4. Our Beginning "I am so delighted to hear you are thinking of forming a Junior League in Kansas City"
    5. 5. Page 5
    6. 6. World War I
    7. 7. Lurannah Harris and the Canteen Page 7 Lurannah sailing to Europe and the entire YMCA Junior League canteen stationed in Germany.
    8. 8. Junior League Club House Page 8
    9. 9. Page 9 ”The Junior League has now passed the years of infancy and inexperience. The Ladies bountiful of the past, scattering funds as their sympathies guided, have become service women of the present, supervised by trained social workers and building up from this experience and by volunteer and the efficient League of today"
    10. 10. Community Focus Page 10
    11. 11. An Early “Flower Power” Project Page 11
    12. 12. Community Focus Page 12
    13. 13. Florence Crittenton Home Florence Crittenton Home, 1890 Florence Crittenton Home, 1918 Crittenton Children’s Center, 2013
    14. 14. FLORENCE CRITTENTON HOME SPOTLIGHT ON THE COMMUNITY VIDEO
    15. 15. Partnership with Florence Crittenton Home •1914 - Volunteers began sewing and cooking classes •1921 to1929 – Took over full management of Crittenton • Members taught parenting technique classes and staffed the daycare and nursery •1978 – Grant for $50,000 to build a new school Countless hours and over $100,000 to the Florence Crittenton Home/Crittenton Children’s Center Countless mothers, children, and families helped
    16. 16. Era of Theater
    17. 17. Children’s Theater
    18. 18. Children’s Theater: The Land of Oz
    19. 19. Children’s Theater: The Patchwork Girl of Oz Page 20
    20. 20. Children’s Theater: Snow White Page 22
    21. 21. Children’s Theater Page 23 Aladdin 1927 Steadfast Tin Soldier 1928
    22. 22. Children’s Theater: Mother Goose in Review 1931 Page 24
    23. 23. Children’s Theater Page 25
    24. 24. Martha Belle Aikins Smith Page 26
    25. 25. The Junior League Follies Page 27
    26. 26. Page 28
    27. 27. Page 29
    28. 28. 1st Follies: Campus Mouser - 1916 Page 30 “The Campus Mouser is the thing just now and every girl who is anyone at all is in it.”
    29. 29. Campus Mouser Makes a Splash Page 31
    30. 30. The Junior League Follies Continue Page 32 “It is said to have more pep and snap than any amateur production yet”
    31. 31. Page 33
    32. 32. Follies’ Fashion
    33. 33. Follies in the Roaring Twenties Page 35
    34. 34. Junior League Follies: 1921 Cast Page 36
    35. 35. Page 38
    36. 36. Page 39 Mrs. Wingate Bixby, chairman of the Junior League Follies traveled to New York to confer with Ned Wayburn who will direct the “Follies” for the Junior League.
    37. 37. Page 40
    38. 38. Page 41
    39. 39. JL Horse Show Ball and Cabaret
    40. 40. Follies: Junior League Night Club 1932 Page 43
    41. 41. Page 44
    42. 42. Page 45
    43. 43. Page 46 And now we present The Junior League of Kansas City, Missouri’s 100th Anniversary Tribute to the Junior League Follies
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