0
TECHNOLOGY: A     CAREGIVER’S BEST FRIENDDr. Julie GiulianiFlorida State College at JacksonvilleContinuing Education
TECHNOLOGYEmerging trends-demographics and digital technology
USES AND BENEFITS• Technology improves •   Quality of Life •   Health and Wellness •   Home Automation, Security and Safet...
TECHNOLOGYe-Connected Family CaregiverNational Alliance for Caregiving & UnitedHealthCare 2011 (n=1,000)
TOP BENEFITS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR               CAREGIVERS   • Saving time (77%) believe they would benefit     somewhat or a...
SILVER TSUNAMI• 78 M Baby Boomers entering retirement• Will change the experience of aging• More will face chronic ageing ...
LOSS OF INDEPENDENCE-GREATEST FEAR            89% WANT TO AGE IN PLACEClarity and EARFoundation, 2007Aging in Place      A...
INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY INDEPENDENT LIVING SOLUTIONSNot Quite There• Convergence of everyday technologies• Inexpensive senso...
QUALITY OF LIFE - SMART HOMESSmart Home 12x24 foot freestanding home fitting in any                     backyard
FINANCIAL INCENTIVE• Ageing in Place       • Assisted Living • Home software/        • Yearly costs=$41,000   products=$4,...
MONITORS AND APPSGet out of bed, take medication, movement in the house- an updated                   electronic report ev...
HEALTH AND MEDICAL  Medical monitoring systems
HEALTH CONDITION-SPECIFIC BRANCHING LOGIC• Supportive Technology
MEDICAL DEVICESGPS for visually impaired                            Heart Monitor Mirror Transmitter
MEDICAL DEVICES• MReminders, Cautions, Tracking systems                          Text Messages
SAFETYWireless, sensors, webcams
COMMUNICATION & SOCIAL           CONNECTIONS•   Facebook•   Twitter•   Skype•   Facetime           Few common technologies...
LIFESTYLE                                         iPad     GamesGoogle Earth Trip                    www. seniorark.com   ...
LifestylePhysical, Mental and Leisure Activity
LIFESTYLELarge screens, icons, ease of use, visuallyengaging, audio components, interactive
EDUCATIONAged enjoy learning as much as    anyone else-may forestallAlzheimer’s or types of dementia
THE FUTURE OF TECHNOLOGY Speech interface, wireless devices, robotic commands-maximize independence at home while decreasi...
CONTINUING EDUCATION FAMILY-        CENTERED CAREGIVING• Saturday, September 8 10am-noon• Thursday, September 13 10am-noon...
THANK YOUQUESTIONS?????????????????
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Iii technology

141

Published on

Technology and Caregiving Presentation

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
141
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Good morning and thank you for being a part of this very special audience. I’m assuming that you are either here today because you are currently a caregiver, or were a caregiver
  • It can reduce the high cost of in-home care and help avoid a crisis. The one consensus about health care is that its cost growth is unsustainable: according to some estimates, it is expected to reach $2.7 trillion in 2009 or 17.3% of GDP, according to the Center for Medicare Services (CMS). With little general agreement on how to contain costs, some consumers and providers still find ways to get or deliver care outside of the walls of the doctor’s office and emergency room. Today home monitoring and telehealth technology markets, self-care technologies, retail clinics, and use of mobile health and online websites help individuals and caregivers to manage chronic disease. By 2020, providers and patients will willingly participate in a process of calibrated care – matching the right level of care at the right time and right place – through lower-cost, technology-enabled and closer-to home interactions. Updated 5-24-2012.The marketplace for technology to assist aging adults is expected to grow sharply from $2 billion today to more than $20 billion by 2020, according to the updated report by Aging in Place Technology Watch. The aging of the 78 million baby boomers and increased awareness of technology solutions will drive sales, according to Laurie M. Orlov, who founded the market research firm in 2009.she has identified four areas of focus that fit together seamlessly when implemented into a home; health and wellness,safety and security, communication and engagement, and learning and contribution all work in tandem to help companies devise the right kinds of products for aging consumersDon’t see the products your constituents need? Launch a fund to get them created. Sometimes organizations become frustrated with the pace of change and decide to do something about it. One of those is Link-age in Mason, Ohio, a group purchasing organization that buys on behalf of 450 senior living communities in 39 states. The organization, led by CEO Scott Collins, is launching a $20 million ‘gray’ national fund to accelerate creation of products and services for seniors. Local investment banker, John Hopper, managing director of the new Link-age Ventures (partnered with CincyTech), rightly observes: "We haven’t bumped into anyone else in the industry doing anything similar.“By 2020, the population of Americans age 55 to 64 will have grown an unprecedented 73 percent since 2000, noted moderator Ken Dychtwald, president and CEO of the consulting firm AgeWave. "Anyone who thinks [the boomers] will turn 65 and be the same as the generation before are missing out on the last 60 years of sociology," he said. "The boomers change every stage of life through which they migrate.“Two-thirds of Americans age 50-64 use the Internet email, shopping and health research most popular. (source of information when purchasing large items-cars, appliances, travel.Two of the key determinants of lifein the early 21st century aredemographics and technology. Two ofthe key trends arising from them arethe ageing of the population and theincreased proliferation and lower priceof digital technology. These two trendsare starting to overlap – more and morepeople are looking to digital technologiesto help older people, and thosewith disabilities, to live more independentand satisfying lives.
  • a quantitative online survey of 1,000 technology‑using family caregivers. National Alliance forCaregiving is a non‑profit coalition of nationalorganizations focusing on issues of familycaregiving. www.caregiving.org and unitedHealthCare
  • Caregivers are most receptive to technologies that help them deliver, monitor, track, or coordinate theirloved one’s medical careA majority, seven in ten, report they have searchedthe Internet for information related to caregiving (70%). Nearly half have used an electronic organizer orcalendar to help them with caregiving (47%), and 11% has participated in a caregiving‑related blog or onlinediscussion. Four in ten have used some other technological device or system—other than a standardcomputer or cell phone—to help them with their caregiving (41%).
  • Senior citizens fear moving into a nursing home and losing their independence more than they fear death, according to a study, “Aging in Place in America,” commissioned by Clarity and The EAR Foundation, which also found that the Baby Boomer children of seniors also fear for their parents. Boomers express particular concern about their parents’ emotional and physical wellbeing should they have to enter a nursing home, finds the study, which examines the attitudes and anxieties of the nation’s elderly population (viaMediaPost).When asked what they fear most, seniors rated loss of independence (26%) and moving out of home into a nursing home (13%) as their greatest fears. Death was cited as the greatest fear for just 3% of seniors.
  • Independa Smart calendar allows caregiver to enter dates, appt. events on calendar-reminds elderly via phone or special device app Special software on device- no computer knowledge required! Single point of communication.By using Angela, care recipients have single touch access to:Video chatText chatE-mail – Yes, FinallyWeb browsing – By CategoryHealth informationFun gamesDaily scheduleMedication remindersPicture frame – Easily share photosAnd more…Apps connect sensors to monitor vital signs, safety and home conditions via a wireless hub to Independa's cloud solution. Care providers will use the Caregiver Web App to track care recipients' well being remotely, while recipients interact using
  • Services to support living and lifestyle are the new demands of an aging societySmart HomeTerms like “intelligent home”,“digital home” and “connected home”are being used to describe the convergenceof a range of technologies –consumer electronics, computers, communications,home automation – andtheir increased use in a domestic settingThe overwhelming sense of detachment and loneliness is a universal feeling among many seniors at nursing homes. According to a 2010 AARP survey, 88 percent of those over 65 want to live in their own homes and respective communities as they age. With the increasing costs of nursing homes and added expenses for hiring health care aid workers, many are searching for alternatives.a modern age cottage with the features of a smart home that caters to seniors. The cottage, dubbed MEDCottage, offers a prefabricated 12 by 24 foot bedroom-bathroom-kitchenette unit that operates as a free standing structure in any backyard. The cottage features rubber floors that can absorb the impact of a fall without causing injury and a runway mat stretching from the bed to the toilet that automatically lights up with a simple touch to make bathroom visits safer. If necessary the MEDCottage can be equipped with a medical monitoring system that tracks blood pressure, glucose, heart rate and blood gases. There is a medical dispenser that sends out voice reminders to the patient and text messages to the caregiver in the event that a patient fails to take medication. With features such as these even tech geeks are in awe.The cottage costs $85,000 for a brand new unit and has a resell value of $38,000 after 24 months. Sensor networks can also monitorthe activities of residents. These canbe used for medical purposes, but theycan also provide data input which willtrigger assistance potentially requiredin household tasks such as cooking.
  • In home motion censors and remote monitoring systems keep aging parents safe and distance caregivers peaceGet out of bed, take medication, movement in the house- daughters get an updated electronic report every morning Concerns… Privacy (there are no cameras), Lack of technology skills, No federal assistance (we are at the beginning stages widespread adoption will span over the next two to ten years.) AARP survey-older people are willing to pay about $50 a month for high-tech devices in the homeIntel researchers are developing devices such as memory bracelets that vibrates at a specified time to remind wearer of medication or a doctor’s appt.Magic carpets and wearable sensors that alert caregiver when change in gate and a possible fallResearch working on cognitive sensors to detect cognitive decline.There is going to be a major transformation in health care because of these technologiesDespite the projects, trails and commercial interest, US is missing in action with tech progress-behind Europe
  • Heart rate monitors, glucose meters, scales to measure weight commonly used to gather data and transmit to patient, their families, caregiver and/or doctor1/3 of the US households have at least one unpaid family medical caregiver present use of medical tech on the rise.GPS system in shoesElectronic pillow plays soothing music to relax and fall asleepA device that reminds the care recipient and dispenses pills on schedule. Electronicbuttons can be pressed for directions on how to take each pill (e.g., on a fullstomach, avoid certain types of foods) and possible side effects to watch out for.It also alerts the caregiver by phone or e-mail if a dosage is not removed from thedevice within a certain time period.Independent again by 2050 88.5 baby boomers will be 65 and over, more than doubling the number in 2008 ( 38.7M) the over 85 pop is expected to more than triple to 19M by 2050.Purpose is to sustain quality of life from the comfort of your home. Ehealth monitoring is in home or in a patients body. Data is collected from device USB, wireless connection, or cell phone then transmitted to a health facility or doctor or family caregiver.All to “age in place”
  • Some are interactive and incorporate condition-specific branching logic. Wearablemeasurements, such as skin temperature and metabolic function has a universal connectivity hub, MetriLink, which allows connecting off the shelf low-cost health products (blood pressure monitors, gloucometers, etc.) to download the data to the Imetrikus Personal Health Record, MediCompass, to be shared with health care professionals. NON environmental Mainly targeted at professional and informal caregivers for coordinating care and early detection of decline in function or health issues; do not require user’s compliance. These systems work indoors only, mostly when a person is living alone. If the motion detectors are not pet immune, the presence of pets may affect the accuracy of the inferences and alerts generated by the system.Logistical- A shared electronic log for care recipient’s doctor appointments and othercaregiving needs. Caregivers can use the system to request a volunteer on certaindays and times, and family members and friends can use it to sign up to help.
  • He hoped that his software would allow doctors to check the vital signs of burn victims or babies without attaching uncomfortable clips, and that it would make it easier for adults to track their cardiovascular health over time a large framed mirror embedded with a more refined version of Poh’s system sits in the MIT Media Lab. Behind the two-way glass, a webcam-equipped monitor is wired to a laptop. Stand before the mirror, and the otherwise blank monitor projects your heart rate on top of your reflection. How It Works: Medical Mirror: The webcam in a monitor behind the two-way mirror captures the changes in the light reflected off the subject’s face when the heart beats. The computer translates the light data into a heart rate reading.
  • Medication Compliance Technologies Monitoring and reminding systems and Honeywell HomMed has a medication monitoring and reminding system as part of the telemedicine suite. The Research on reminder systems is active at Intel research laboratories, the University of Toronto, the University of Rochester, the University of Michigan, the University of Dundee and Accenture
  • #1 Fear of seniors-Falling#2 Fear not being able to call help
  • Facetime Now you can make video calls to iPad 2, iPhone 4, the new iPod touch,or another Mac. Right from your Mac. 4.3. Social connectedness technologiesFrom medication alerts to general reminders, from social interactions to health and safety monitoring, Independa lets you rest easier knowing that, together, we’ve got things covered. With Independa, your care services provider can empower you to be fully involved and engaged in your loved one’s care, even from a distance.Features include your ability to check in on your loved one using simple video chat (no computer knowledge required on their part!), automated reminders for medications and calendar events, check in calls for support of important activities of daily living, or other important social engagement features such as auto-connect calls for birthdays and anniversaries of friends and family and Life Stories, where you get to capture your loved ones “life” and memories over telephone-based recordings.The value proposition is increased social connectedness, improved quality of life and potential for improved health outcome for both seniors and caregivers (primarily informal caregivers). These involve out-of-pocket expense to seniors and/or families. Literature on the types of technology available and its effectiveness is scarce. Commonly used means of communication in younger generations such as cell phones and computers are being adapted for elderly use, but few companies and researchers are looking at the problem in innovative ways. Congregate care providers are starting to explore some of these technologies, e.g., Nintendo Wii, Dakim and It’s Never 2 Late as they may enhance social interactions in group settings. A video phone systemA phone with video capability or an Internet-connected computer with webcam thatallows caregivers to check in and see the care recipient when they can’t physicallybe together (during work, vacations, errands, long-distance caregiving)
  • What is their favorite hobby or interest?http://www.seniorark.com/senior_links_for_fun.htm Showing seniors how to meet the challenges in retirement(Games for Seniors)The aged and disabled enjoy entertainmentas much as anyone else. Indeed,the provision of entertainmentin the home may hold a more importantpart in their lives because of their relativelack of mobility. The enhancementof entertainment and other lifestyleexperiences through the usage of digitaltechnology is therefore an importantissue, though one in which usageby the aged and disabled may not differsignificantly from the population ingeneral.
  • Interactive system for physical, mental and leisure activitiesA TV-based device, like a Wii Fit, that would allow the caregiver to create aschedule of gentle physical activities and mental games for the care recipient. Itincludes personalized activities with family photos, illustrated audio books and otheraudio-visual and interactive leisure activities for him/her.
  • no setup - No MaintenanceEdge to edge full Screens displays for Optimal viewingmost prevalent obstacle to trying these devices is the perception that they would be expensive.Home banking and shoppingvia the internet are technologies thathave the potential to enhance independencewww.aplusseniorcomputer.comEasy Email & WebWord processor with spelling and grammar checkCalendar with remindersphoto sharingFree Video Chat10 Bonus games includedZoom MagnificationBuilt-in WirelessBuilt-in webcamNon-computerized U.S. Based SupportLifetime Virus Protection
  • http://www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses Variety of liberal arts, law and technology coursesWidespread reports suggest that being mentally active may forestall mental decline, perhaps even Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia (although not clinically proven)Playing video games might be a good brain exercise –older brains may not be able to sharpen their skills as fast as younger ones- have to work their brains harder.
  • uses sensors to perceive the wheelchair's surroundings, a speech interface to interpret commands, a wireless device for room-level location determination, and motor-control software to effect the wheelchair's motion. The robotic wheelchair learns the layout of its environmentThe need to maximise independenceat home is of high importance in maintainingquality of life as well as decreasingthe number of carer supporthours needed by the individual [28].Home automation is sometimescalled domotics (from the Latin domus,house). It refers to the application ofinformation, robotic and control technologiesto domestic appliances andthe house itself.
  • Transcript of "Iii technology"

    1. 1. TECHNOLOGY: A CAREGIVER’S BEST FRIENDDr. Julie GiulianiFlorida State College at JacksonvilleContinuing Education
    2. 2. TECHNOLOGYEmerging trends-demographics and digital technology
    3. 3. USES AND BENEFITS• Technology improves • Quality of Life • Health and Wellness • Home Automation, Security and Safety • Communication and Social Engagement • Lifestyle and Learning
    4. 4. TECHNOLOGYe-Connected Family CaregiverNational Alliance for Caregiving & UnitedHealthCare 2011 (n=1,000)
    5. 5. TOP BENEFITS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR CAREGIVERS • Saving time (77%) believe they would benefit somewhat or a great deal • Logistics (76%) making caregiving easier • Making the care recipient feel safer (75%) • Increasing feelings of being effective (74%) • Reducing stress (74%) Most receptive to technologies that help deliver, monitor, track and coordinate careNational Alliance for Caregiving & United HealthCare 2011
    6. 6. SILVER TSUNAMI• 78 M Baby Boomers entering retirement• Will change the experience of aging• More will face chronic ageing conditions • Arthritis • Diabetes • Osteoporosis • Senile Dementia Focus on better home health care services and lifestyle independence
    7. 7. LOSS OF INDEPENDENCE-GREATEST FEAR 89% WANT TO AGE IN PLACEClarity and EARFoundation, 2007Aging in Place Armed with sensors, webcams and GPS systems we’ll be able to keep track of elderly and preserve sense of independence
    8. 8. INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY INDEPENDENT LIVING SOLUTIONSNot Quite There• Convergence of everyday technologies• Inexpensive sensor detectors• Internet/Ethernet Infrastructure Health Care Database Still, fragmented market- need more integrated infrastructure
    9. 9. QUALITY OF LIFE - SMART HOMESSmart Home 12x24 foot freestanding home fitting in any backyard
    10. 10. FINANCIAL INCENTIVE• Ageing in Place • Assisted Living • Home software/ • Yearly costs=$41,000 products=$4,000 • Nursing Home = • $130 mn to monitor $85,000 Transparency, Customized
    11. 11. MONITORS AND APPSGet out of bed, take medication, movement in the house- an updated electronic report every morning
    12. 12. HEALTH AND MEDICAL Medical monitoring systems
    13. 13. HEALTH CONDITION-SPECIFIC BRANCHING LOGIC• Supportive Technology
    14. 14. MEDICAL DEVICESGPS for visually impaired Heart Monitor Mirror Transmitter
    15. 15. MEDICAL DEVICES• MReminders, Cautions, Tracking systems Text Messages
    16. 16. SAFETYWireless, sensors, webcams
    17. 17. COMMUNICATION & SOCIAL CONNECTIONS• Facebook• Twitter• Skype• Facetime Few common technologies adapted for elderly use
    18. 18. LIFESTYLE iPad GamesGoogle Earth Trip www. seniorark.com Kindle
    19. 19. LifestylePhysical, Mental and Leisure Activity
    20. 20. LIFESTYLELarge screens, icons, ease of use, visuallyengaging, audio components, interactive
    21. 21. EDUCATIONAged enjoy learning as much as anyone else-may forestallAlzheimer’s or types of dementia
    22. 22. THE FUTURE OF TECHNOLOGY Speech interface, wireless devices, robotic commands-maximize independence at home while decreasing number of caregiving support hours needed
    23. 23. CONTINUING EDUCATION FAMILY- CENTERED CAREGIVING• Saturday, September 8 10am-noon• Thursday, September 13 10am-noon• Deerwood Campus• To register: fscj.edu/continuing education• Select “Personal Enrichment”• Select “Introduction to Family-Centered CaregivingDr. Julie Giulianijgiulian@fscj.edu904-633-8415
    24. 24. THANK YOUQUESTIONS?????????????????
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×