Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Pet preparedness
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Pet preparedness

218

Published on

When a disaster occurs, your pets will be affected! Here are some tips about what to consider.

When a disaster occurs, your pets will be affected! Here are some tips about what to consider.

Published in: Lifestyle, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
218
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PETPREPAREDNESS Judy L. Harmon, CEM Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management
  • 2. Picture This …..  A natural gas leak forces a neighborhood evacuation.  You’re told to go to the nearest fire station  You must leave by foot  By the way….it’s November  Oh, it’s also 9:30 at night What do you need to consider????Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 2
  • 3. Considerations  How far would you have to walk?  What precautions should be taken for weather?  What would you take with you – how heavy is it and how easy to move?  How long might you be out of your house?  What backup plan for housing?  What about your PETS?Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 3
  • 4. Now Picture This….  It’s 10:54 in the morning  It’s a Wednesday  A 6.8 earthquake occurs  Reports of structural damage on radioPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 4
  • 5. More Considerations  Where would you be?  How would you get home?  Does anyone in your neighborhood know your pets?  If you had to leave your home, where would your pets go?  Do you have supplies for your pets?Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 5
  • 6. Today’s Objectives  Define “Pet” for this session  Evaluate the owner/pet bond  Identify and mitigate 5 risks to your pet(s)  List 5 elements of a pet preparedness plan  Describe your response and your pet’s  Identify 5 components of recovery  Choose 2 Action Steps for the next weekPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 6
  • 7. Reasons for Pet Ownership  “Pets” – Household / Not Livestock  Personal pleasure and companionship  Educational experience for children  Replacement of persons in their lives  Personal and property protection  Rescue of an animal from neglect  Assistance for physical, mental limitations Studies show more than 60% of pet owners consider pets to be very or extremely important to their families.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 7
  • 8. Pets: A Significant Concern? Percent of US Households Owning a Pet 58.9% Dogs (1.69 per household) 31.6% Cats (2.19 per household) 27.3% Birds (2.74 per household) 4.6% Other Pets 10.7% Source: U.S. Pet Ownership and Demographics Sourcebook, Center for Information Management, American Veterinary Medical Association. Schaumburg, IL. 1997.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 8
  • 9. Concerns During a Disaster  Spoilage of human food and water supply  Animal bites  Transmittal of diseases between animals and humans  Mental health issues including:  Feelings of guilt  Bereavement, and  AngerPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 9
  • 10. Owner / Pet Bond  Some more concerned for pets than themselves  Fail to evacuate  Attempt to re-enter  Attempt unsafe rescues  Others may not care About 50% of households may be affected!Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 10
  • 11. FACTS  You can’t take care of your pet(s) if you’re unprepared or injured in a failed rescue attempt. YOUR SAFETY IS PRIORITY.  Care for animals may facilitate personal safety and care of others with pets.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 11
  • 12. IDENTIFYING RISKS  Meteorological (Weather / Geological)  Most common  Impact localized or widespread  Predictable or unpredictable  May have long-term impacts  Technological (Man-Made)  Human error  Consequences of natural disasters  TerrorismPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 12
  • 13. 10 Most Recent Presidentially-Declared Disasters in Pierce County, WA  January 1990: Storms and Floods  November 1990: Storms and Floods  December 1990: Storms, Winds and Floods  January 1993: "Inauguration Day" Storm  August 1994: Economic Disaster (Fishing Industry)  November/December 1995: Floods and Wind  February 1996: Floods  December 1996/February 1997: Ice Storm and Floods  March 1997: Floods  February 2001: Nisqually Earthquake  October 2002: Storm and FloodPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 13
  • 14. Mitigation: Defined  Preventing an emergency  Reducing the likelihood of an emergency  Reducing the damaging effects of unavoidable hazardsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 14
  • 15. Mitigation: Weather Risks  Thunderstorms  Lightning  Winds  Flooding  Winter Storms  Drought  Extreme Heat  WildfiresPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 15
  • 16. Mitigation: Geological Risks  Landslides / Mudflows  Earthquakes  Tsunamis  VolcanoPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 16
  • 17. Mitigation: Technological Risks  Hazardous Materials  Resulting consequences of natural disaster  TerrorismPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 17
  • 18. It can’t happen to me ….  Disasters are not just major events  Individual family disasters more common:  150,000 household fires  10,000 violent thunderstorms  5,000 floods  800 tornadoes  Many forest fires  Several hurricanes and earthquakes ANNUALLYPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 18
  • 19. 5 Preparedness Elements  Develop an emergency plan  Prepare your own disaster kit  Prepare a disaster kit for each pet  Establish pet identification  Practice the emergency planPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 19
  • 20. Prepare: An Emergency Plan  Imagine types of disasters that may occur  Develop general family plan  Decide on meeting place for family  Establish Pet Emergency Contact List  Decide on how pet will be cared for  Keep pet vaccinations currentPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 20
  • 21. Prepare: An Emergency Plan Emergency Contact List  Pet Sitters, Kennels, Veterinarians  Local shelters (50 mile radius)  Boarding Facilities/Shelters (100 mile radius)  Neighbors (2 or more – a neighborhood plan!)  Friend or person who knows your pets  Out of state contact (share with others)  List of pet stores, feed stores, groomers  Local animal rescue groups  List of animal behavior consultants or trainers  Other non-profit animal rescue groups  Pet-Friendly Hotels/MotelsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 21
  • 22. Prepare: An Emergency Plan How will pet be cared for?  Pets – will they be allowed in public shelters  Local animal shelter/humane society plans  Special shelters may be established  May be able to take to hotel or motel  Trusted neighbor or family may assistPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 22
  • 23. Prepare: Your Disaster Kit  Your safety is PRIORITY  Only once you’re taken care of, can you be effective caring for others (including your pets)  Duplicate supplies may be shared with pet Waiting in the car while family registers at shelter (water, first aid kit) – others cannot be sharedPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 23
  • 24. Prepare: Pet Disaster Kit  Suggested list included in handout packet  One for each pet based on needs  Do not store in kitchen or garage  Store in rodent- and ant-proof containers  Check twice yearly (when clocks change)  Rotate all foods, water, medicationsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 24
  • 25. Prepare: Pet Disaster Kit Special Considerations for Birds:  Dietary supplements  Plant mister for hot weather  Hot packs for cold weather  Paper towels for bottom of cage  Cage perch and toys  Towel to cover cage to calm bird, othersPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 25
  • 26. Prepare: Pet Disaster Kit Special Considerations for Amphibians:  Use water-tight plastic containers – sand the holes to prevent injury  Semiaquatics: tiny amount of water, moss, moistened paper towels, foam rubber  Monitor air and water temperature  Avoid loud noises, vibrations  Plan for escapes !Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 26
  • 27. Prepare: Pet Disaster Kit Special Considerations for Reptiles:  Use pillowcases for transport if needed  Transfer to secure cage  Dietary supplements  Water bowl for soaking, mister, hot pad  Battery-operated heat lamp or other source  Appropriate handling gloves / suppliesPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 27
  • 28. Prepare: Pet Disaster Kit Special Considerations for Small Mammals (ferrets, hamsters, gerbils, mice):  Use cage for transport and to reduce stress  Dietary supplements  Extra bedding materials  Appropriate exercise equipmentPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 28
  • 29. Prepare: Pet Identification Unfamiliar sounds, smells, sights cause confusion  Tags – with name, address, phone  Licensure and rabies tags  Consider out-of-state contact  Veterinary contact information  Microchips, Tattoos, Leg Bands  Current photographsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 29
  • 30. Prepare: Practice the Plan My “Dusty”  Obedience train  Basic commands: Come, Sit, Stay  Bark / Quiet commands  Eliminate on command  Familiarize to Cage/Crate/Kennel/Leash  Application of muzzle / booties for pads  Use of syringe/droppersPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 30
  • 31. Prepare: Practice the Plan  Pet First Aid Training  Formal classes available  Pet First Aid Books  Practice when pet feels good  Discuss emergency medications with vet Remember: Veterinarians may not be immediately accessible after a disasterPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 31
  • 32. Response to an Incident  Stay calm; assess the situation.  Never put yourself or others at risk.  Secure your pets immediately.  Listen to the Emergency Alert System.  Follow guidelines identified for pets.  If pet injured, provide basic care, and seek veterinary assistance when available.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 32
  • 33. Response to an Incident  Take your animals if evacuating.  If unable to take, secure in a safe room with food and water  Post signs clearly for rescuers to know what they will encounter and who to contact to care for the petsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 33
  • 34. Response: Pet Behavior  Most animals will panic, some will turn to you for security.  Toileting, eating, and other habits will sometimes change for the worse  Obsessive chewing, licking, panting, or excessive shedding can be symptoms of high stress.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 34
  • 35. Response: Pet Behavior CATS:  Normal for cats to disappear. Usually will hide nearby or in favorite hiding places.  In earthquake may disappear for 24 to 72 hours.  If stranded, may cry incessantly and lose voice.  Most often visible at dusk or early morning.  Litter box problems normal.  May not want to eat due to stress.  May be aggressive and bite or scratch.  Often will try to escape.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 35
  • 36. Response: Pet Behavior DOGS:  Will not usually hide.  Will usually run blindly out of home territory.  May be hit by a vehicle and killed or severely injured.  Pad injuries will be common.Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 36
  • 37. 5 Elements of Recovery  Initiating Clean-up  Establishing New Pet Environment  Finding Lost Pets  Post-Disaster Problems  Caring for YourselfPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 37
  • 38. Recovery: Clean-Up  Keep pets secured – leashes / cages  Have damage assessed by insurance  Remove debris that could cause injury  Discard edible debris securely  Check for gas leaks – allow air circulation  Dry out the area if necessaryPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 38
  • 39. Recovery: New Environment  Pets may be anxious – disoriented  Watch for other signs of stress  Introduce pets to new environment  Secure perimeters before releasing pet  Establish schedule for feeding / exercise  Allow pet to sleepPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 39
  • 40. Recovery: Finding a Pet  Post “LOST” signs:  Photos, Contact info  Description, any unusual characteristics  Date last seen, Location last seen  Best way to approach the pet  Use local networks for listing lost pet  Physically check animal control and shelters DAILY  Notify local veterinarians and neighborsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 40
  • 41. Recovery: Post-Disaster Problems  Finding deceased pets  Dogs running in packs  Feral cats  Increase in fleas, mosquitoes, heartworm  Exhaustion  Bereavement (yours and other pets)Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 41
  • 42. Recovery: Caring for Yourself  Share your experiences  Talk with friends and family  If pet is deceased, allow yourself to grieve  Consider seeking professional counseling  Be open to rescuing another pet  Restock your personal disaster kitsPierce County Dept of Emergency Management 42
  • 43. ACTION STEPS Personal Accountability  Identify 2 Action Steps to take within the next week: 1. __________________________________ 2. __________________________________Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 43
  • 44. Thank you for:  your time today  your commitment to personal preparedness  your commitment to your neighborhoods  your willingness to be prepared for pets!! Judy L. Harmon, CEM jharmon@co.pierce.wa.us 253-798-2108 (and Dusty !!)Pierce County Dept of Emergency Management 44

×