Job Seeker's Bill of Rights

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Take charge of your job hunt and how you work with staffing firm recruiters. Here's a list of your Bill of Rights.

Take charge of your job hunt and how you work with staffing firm recruiters. Here's a list of your Bill of Rights.

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  • 1. JOB SEEKER BILL OF RIGHTSMost recruiters love their job and are in this line of work because they like to help people. But some recruiters orstaffing firms have gotten a bad reputation. This usually happens because a job seeker’s expectations of what theywill do for them (i.e., find them a job), and the reality of what they can actually do, are not understood.I’ll admit there are some recruiters who are, well, a tad bit too eager to make a job placement, and they do thingsthat give other recruiters a black eye. You have rights when you deal with recruiters or staffing firms! Insist on them.• You have the right to be treated respectfully and courteously. If you aren’t, don’t work with that recruiter.• You have the right to insist that recruiters never send your resume to a company without your permission. Afterall, it might be a company you were fired from, or a company you would never want to work for, or a companywhere an employee knows your current boss and tells her you’re looking for a new job!• If a recruiter or staffing firm who you’ve never talked to calls you and says their client wants to interview or hireyou, be wary! They probably pulled your resume from an online site and sent it around to their clients withoutyour permission. Don’t work with someone who does this.• You have the right to know where you stand in comparison to other people with backgrounds similar to yours –they are the people you’re competing against. Just ask your recruiter how you stack up.• You have the right to know that if a recruiter calls you about a job, and you’ve already interviewed with thatcompany or applied there any time in the past year, the recruiter will not be able to submit for the job opening,even if you’re the perfect candidate. Why? Companies feel they ‘own’ the candidates in their database or who’vethey EVER interviewed, and won’t pay a recruiter a fee for having rediscovered you.• You have the right to know that while creative staffing firms would love to be able to work with new graduates orentry-level workers, they are rarely asked to recruit them for their clients.• You have the right to negotiate any contract or agreement the staffing firm asks you to sign – and be sure to readsuch documents carefully.• You have the right to register with as many other staffing agencies as you want. If you do, then just rememberthat it’s the first recruiter to call or email you about a job opening who gets to present you to that company. This isimportant to know since a company may have as many as 10 staffing firms all recruiting people for the same job,and so you may be contacted by several different recruiters. To make sure that multiple recruiters dont try tosubmit your resume to the same job/company, you have the right to know the name of the company when arecruiter calls you about an opening. You should insist on knowing that.• You have the right to say ‘no thanks’ when they call you about a job, without them feeling slighted or making youfeel bad.• You have the right to know that for contract jobs, recruiters mark-up the hourly rate they pay you anywhere from50 to 70% and that is what their client pays them. The difference in the pay and bill rate is what they use to paytheir staff, rent, utilities and other bills, and hopefully make some profit and stay in business.• You have the right to know that if a recruiter places you in a full-time job, the hiring company pays the recruiter afee that is a percentage of your salary, usually from 15 to 25%.• Once you’ve started working a contract job through a staffing firm, you have the right to change your mind andquit, as long as you give the staffing firm two weeks’ notice just as you would give to any other employer.www.wunderlandgroup.comSan Francisco | Chicago | New York