Chesm handbook v17

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Chesm handbook v17

  1. 1. Contractor Handbook Gulf of Mexico Business Unit and Deepwater Exploration and Projects Business Unit
  2. 2. Contractor Handbook Gulf of Mexico Business Unit and Deepwater Exploration and Projects Business Unit Revised 2011
  3. 3. BIC is a federally registered trademark of the BIC Group. Crescent is a federally registered trademark of Cooper Brands, Inc. Crocs is a federally registered trademark of Crocs, Inc. EXCEL-FR is a trademark of Bulwark Protective Apparel. INDURA is a federally registered trademark of Westex Inc. ISNetworld is a federally registered trademark of ISN Software Corp. Multi-Plier is a federally registered trademark of Fiskars Inc. KEVLAR is a federally registered trademark of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. TWIC is a federally registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Varsol is a federally registered trademark of Exxon Mobil Corporation. WellCAP is a federally registered certification mark of the International Association of Drilling Contractors. © 2011 Chevron U.S.A. Inc. All rights reserved. Original edition effective July 1, 2003; current edition effective January 2011. This document contains confidential and proprietary information of Chevron Corp. Any use of this document without prior written authorization from Chevron and/or its affiliates is prohibited. Publication is available on our website: https://upstream.chevron.com/contractorgom
  4. 4. Contents 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 1.1 Operational Excellence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. 1.2 How to Use This Handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 Responsibility Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1 Chevron Employee Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Contractor Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 Stop-Work Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.0 Chevron Workplace Principles and Policies . . . . . . . . . 8 3.1 Professional Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.2 Contraband: Drugs, Alcohol, Weapons, . Pornography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.2.1 Alcohol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.2.2 Illegal Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.2.3 Prescription Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.2.4 Internet Prescription Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.2.5 Explosives and Firearms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. 3.3 SafeGulf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 1 3.4 Transportation Worker Identification Card . . . . . . . 1 1 3.5 Housekeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. 1 3.6 Smoking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. 1 3.7 Fishing Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 1 3.8 Language Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 1 3.9 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 1 3.10 Behavior-Based Safety Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 1 3.11 Orientation of Visitors at Offshore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. 1 3.12 Short-Service Employee Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. 1 3.12.1 Contractor Short-Service Employee Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. 1 3.13 Root Cause Analysis/Incident Investigation . . . . . . 20 3.14 HES Ratings Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 2 Contractor Handbook | i
  5. 5. 3.15 Cell Phone Usage While Operating a 8 Motor Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22. 3.16 Management Field Visits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22. 3.17 Subcontractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22. 4.0 Emergency Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. 4.1 Medical Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. 4.2 Medical Emergency Transportation 8 Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. 4.3 Hurricane Evacuation Action Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. 4.4 Damaged Facility Assessment and Boarding Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 4.4.1 Facility Status Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25. 4.4.1.1i Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25. 4.4.1.2i Closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25. 4.4.2 Status Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26. 4.4.3 Damage Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26. 4.4.4 Initial Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 4.4.5 Boarding Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27. 4.4.6 Methods to Secure Closed Facilities . . . . . . 28. 4.4.7 Accessing Closed Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. 4.4.8 Boarding Mitigation Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. 4.4.9 Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. 4.4.10 Boarding Assessment Personnel . . . . . . . . . 30. 4.4.11 Operations Representative or . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contract Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30. 4.5 Incident Reporting Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31. 8 4.6 Oil Spill Response Plan and Notifications . . . . . . . 31. 8. 4.7 Emergency Response and Drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32. 5.0 HES Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 5.1 Onsite HES Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33. 5.2 Pre-Job HES Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 6.0 Personal Protection Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35. 6.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.2 Fee for Arriving Without Appropriate PPE . . . . . . 35. ii | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  6. 6. 6.3 Head Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.4 Eye Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36. 6.4.1 Selecting Eye Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38. 6.5 Contact Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42. 6.6 Foot Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43. 6.7 Hand Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 .. 4 6.7.1 Examples of Non-Chemical Types of Hand Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..45 6.7.2 Examples of Chemical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hand Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 6.8 Hearing Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 6.9 Protective Clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 6.9.1 Fire-Resistant Clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 6.10 Respiratory Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 6.11 Personal Flotation Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5 6.12 PPE During After-Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 7.0 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56. 7.1 Marine Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 5 7.2 Personnel Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59. 7.3 Personnel Baskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61. 7.3.1 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61. 7.3.2 Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. 7.3.3 Safe Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. 7.4 Swing Rope Guidelines and Procedures . . . . . . . . . 64. 7.5 Helicopter Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65. 7.6 Aviation Emergency Medical Procedures . . . . . . . 67. 7.7 Hazardous Materials Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . 67. 7.8 Foreign-Flagged Vessels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68. 7.9 Marine Safety, Reliability, and Efficiency . . . . . . . . 70. 8.0 Offshore (Water) Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71. 8.1 Personnel Entry Into Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 8.2 Helicopter Underwater Egress Training and . . Water Survival Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71. Contractor Handbook | iii
  7. 7. 9.0 Environmental Stewardship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72. 9.1 Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72. 9.2 Waste Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74. 9.2.1 Hazardous Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. 7 9.2.2 E&P Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75. 9.2.3 Solid Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 7 9.2.4 Other Regulated Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 7 9.3 Pollution Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76. 9.4 National Pollutant Discharge . Elimination System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7 10.0 Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene . . . . . 9. 7 10.1 Fit for Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79. 10.2 Hazard Communication . (HAZCOM)/MSDS Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. 7 10.3 General Industrial Hygiene Principles . . . . . . . . . 0. 8 10.3.1 Naturally Occurring . Radioactive Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 8 10.3.2 Asbestos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 8 10.3.3 Benzene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 8 10.3.4 Lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. 8 10.4 Heat Stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 8 10.5 Fatigue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 11.0 General Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 8 11.1 Lifting of Loads by Personnel . . (Manual Lifting Policy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. 8 11.2 Requirements for Third-Party . . Equipment Brought to Chevron Facility . . . . . . . 86. 11.2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 8 11.2.2 Operating Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 8 11.2.3 Pressurized Production Equipment . . . . . 7. 8 11.2.4 Repair and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. 8 11.2.5 Repressurizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. 8 11.2.6 Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. 8 11.2.7 Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. 8 iv | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  8. 8. 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.2.8 Pig Launchers and Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. 8 Use of Cheater Bars and Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89. Use of Hand and Power Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89. 11.4.1 Knife Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90. Ladders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 . . Working Overhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . 9 Repetitive Stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 12.0 Specialized Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93. 12.1 Scaffolding Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93. 12.2 Paint and Blast Waste Media Discharges . . . . . 93 12.3 Sandblasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93. 12.4 Painting on Chevron Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94. 12.5 Compressed Air Used for Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . 97. 12.6 Temporary and Permanently Closed . . Heliports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98. 12.7 Perforating Operations – Heliport . . Operational Hazard Warnings and . . Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 12.7.1 Personnel Conducting . . Perforating Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99. 12.7.2 Pilots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99. 12.8 Subpart O Requirements – Gulf of Mexico OCS Locations Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100. 12.8.1 Production Operations Plan . . . . . . . . . . 100. . 12.8.2 Drilling, Completion, Workover, and . . Well Service Operations Plan . . . . . . . . . 01. 1 12.9 DOT Operator Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 02 1 12.9.1 Record Keeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102. 12.9.2 Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103. . 13.0 Drilling and Well Servicing Operations . . . . . . . . . . 105. 13.1 Emergency Drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105. 13.2 Well Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105. 13.3 Blowout Prevention Equipment Tests . . . . . . . . . 05. 1 13.4 Regulatory Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106. . Contractor Handbook | v
  9. 9. 14.0 Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 15.0 Fuels and Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 15.1 Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 15.1.1 Storing and Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 15.1.2 Fueling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 09. 1 15.2 Compressed Gas Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 09. 1 15.2.1 Moving Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 09. 1 15.2.2 Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. 1 15.2.3 Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110. 15.2.4 Oxygen Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. 1 15.2.5 Acetylene Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. 1 15.2.6 Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. 1 16.0 Safe Work Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113. 16.1 Permit to Work Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. 1 16.1.1 Hazard Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. 1 16.1.2 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18. 1 16.2 Planning Phase Hazard Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20. 1 16.3 Think Incident Free (TIF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20. 1 16.4 Hazard Analysis Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21. 1 16.5 Form Selection Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 1 16.6 Hazard Identification – Using the Tool . . . . . . . . 126 16.7 Hazard Identification – Chevron’s Expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Hazard Identification Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 1 16.8 Isolation of Hazardous Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129. 16.8.1 Isolation of Hazardous Energy . . Procedures on Chevron Facilities . . . . . . .129 16.8.2 Use of Lockboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. 1 16.9 Work at Height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130. 16.9.1 When Fall Protection/Arrest . . Equipment Is Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131. 16.9.2 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131. 16.9.3 Required Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133. 16.9.4 Training Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133. 16.9.5 Open Hole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 1 vi | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  10. 10. 16.9.6 Openings in Decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 16.9.7 Requirements for Guardrails . . . . . . . . . .135. 16.10 Simultaneous Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136. 16.10.1 Simultaneous Operations Plan . . . . . . . .136. 16.10.2 Simultaneous Operations Documentation/Communication . . . . . .137. 16.11 Hot Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 38 1 16.12 Fire Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 1 16.12.1 Fire Retardant Tarps (Chevron . . . GOM Facilities Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 16.12.2 Fire Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 16.12.3 Ignition Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141. 6.12.3.12Personal Electronic Devices . 141. 6.12.3.2 Flashlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142. 6.12.3.3 Portable Communication . . . Radios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142. 6.12.3.4 Other Electronic Equipment . 142. 16.12.4 Use of Solvents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142. 16.13 Electrical Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143. 16.13.1 Electrical Safe-Work Practice . . . . . . . . 143. 16.13.2 Electrical Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144. 16.13.3 Extension Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144. 16.13.4 Static Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145. 16.14 Confined Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46. 1 16.14.1 Chevron Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . 147. 16.14.2 Contractor Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . 148. 16.15 Bypassing Critical Protections . . . Chevron Production Facilities Only. . . . . . . . . . .150. 16.15.1 Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150. 16.15.2 Minimum Number of Devices . . . . . . . . 150. 16.15.3 Monitor and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50. 1 16.15.4 Qualified Person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151. 16.15.5 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. 1 16.16 Excavation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151. 6.16.1 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151. 16.16.2 Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . 52. 1 Contractor Handbook | vii
  11. 11. 16.16.3 Competent Person (Qualified Professional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152. 16.16.4 Critical Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153. 16.16.5 Modes of Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153. 16.16.6 Excavation Permits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154. 16.16.7 Leadership Expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 1 17.0 Lifting and Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 17.1 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56. 1 17.2 Heavy Lifts/Hazardous Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56. 1 17.3 Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57. 1 17.4 Crane Repairs and Alterations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 17.5 Sling Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59. 1 17.6 Sling Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59. 1 17.6.1 Pre-Use Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59. 1 17.6.2 Annual Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 1 17.6.3 Identification Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 17.6.4 Sling Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162. 17.7 Rigging Hardware – Maintenance and Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. 1 17.7.1 Shackles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. 1 17.7.2 Eyebolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63. 1 17.7.3 Hooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64. 1 17.7.4 Pad Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64. 1 17.8 Delivering and/or Handling Cargo at . . Chevron Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65. 1 17.9 Tag Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68. 1 17.10 Overhead Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69. 1 17.11 Requirements for Chevron– and . . Contractor-Owned Cranes on . . Chevron Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70. 1 17.11.1 Contract Crane Operator . . Classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70. 1 17.11.2 Contract Crane Operator . . Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72. 1 17.11.3 Weight Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72. 1 viii | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  12. 12. 17.11.4 Unattended Control Stations . . . . . . . .. 173. 17.11.5 Bypass of Safety Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 174. 17.12 Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174. 17.12.1 Radio Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174. 17.12.2 re-Lift Checklist and JSA . . . . . . . . . . . 175 P 17.12.3 Lift Team Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . .175 17.12.3.1 Pre-Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176. 17.12.3.2 During Operation . . . . . . . . . . 176. 17.12.4 Crane Operator Responsibilities . . . . . 177 17.12.4.1 Pre-Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 177. 17.12.4.2 During Operation . . . . . . . . . . 178. 17.12.4.3 Post-Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 17.12.5 Rigger Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 17.12.5.1 Pre-Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179. 17.12.5.2 During Operation . . . . . . . . . . 180 17.12.5.3 Post-Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 17.12.6 Vessel Captain Responsibilities . . . . . . 181 17.12.6.1 Pre-Use Inspection . . . . . . . . 182. 17.12.7 Alternate Lifting Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 17.12.8 ISO/Shipping Containers . . . . . . . . . . . . 184. Appendix A – List of Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Contractor Handbook | ix
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  14. 14. 1.0 Introduction Chevron Gulf of Mexico business units value the safety of all workers and the protection of our environment. Our company is committed to having incident-free operations (IFO). We can only achieve this by working as a team with our contractors. The following terms are used in this handbook to describe the contractor company and personnel mentioned in the guidelines: Handbook Terms Contractor A contractor is defined for the purposes of this document as any company or individual which by contract, subcontract, or purchase order performs work or provides services or equipment to or for Chevron. Contractor Supervisor/ Person Leading Work (PLW) This individual represents the contractor company that supervises the work of a contractor or contractors. This handbook provides guidance and a minimum set of expectations for Chevron employees and contractors regarding contractor work performed for Chevron. As the contractor, you are required to follow the policies and procedures established by the contractor’s company in addition to any of Chevron’s site-specific policies. This handbook is intended to supplement, not replace, the contractor’s company safety program, which the contractor is required to implement. In the event of a conflict between this handbook and the contractor’s company safety program, the more stringent rule shall apply. The contractor company’s contract with Chevron may be canceled, or an Contractor Handbook | 1
  15. 15. individual may be requested to leave Chevron premises and not return if the guidelines of this handbook are not followed. Chevron is continuously looking for ways to improve our health, environment, and safety (HES) programs. To communicate feedback for improvement or changes to this document, please access the Chevron external Gulf of Mexico Contractor Safety website at https://upstream. chevron.com/contractorgom/. 1.1 Operational Excellence Operational Excellence (OE) is a Chevron system for managing the areas of health, safety, environment, reliability, and efficiency and is one of our critical drivers for business success. The contractor will be exposed to Operational Excellence and our efforts to achieve incidentfree operations while working for Chevron. Both of these goals are important to our business, and it is essential that our contractors and their employees understand and are familiar with them. Operational Excellence is based on the ten tenets that Chevron is committed to using to guide decision making, work planning, and execution in all situations. It is our expectation that contractors working under Chevron’s operational control will abide by these tenets as well. Chevron’s Operational Excellence Tenets of Operation We Believe: All incidents are preventable. Two Key Principles: • Do it safely or not at all. • There is always time to do it right. 2 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  16. 16. Chevron’s Operational Excellence Tenets of Operation We ALWAYS: iiii 1. Operate within design and environmental limits. ii2. Operate in a safe and controlled condition. ii3. Ensure safety devices are in place and functioning. ii ii ii 4. Follow safe work practices and procedures. 5. Meet or exceed customers’ requirements. 6. Maintain integrity of dedicated systems. ii7. Comply with all applicable rules and regulations. ii 8. Address abnormal conditions. ii9. Follow written procedures for high-risk or unusual situations. 10. Involve the right people in decisions that affect procedures and equipment. 1.2 How to Use This Handbook The intent of this handbook is to provide guidance to our contractors and employees regarding Chevron’s expectations of its contractor workforce. All of Chevron’s contractors should have a copy of this handbook accessible to them. The contents of this handbook should be reviewed, discussed, and understood by contract personnel before any work is performed for Chevron. If an HES issue arises that is not addressed in the handbook or by the contractor’s own safety program, you must ask for guidance from the contractor representative or a Chevron representative. Contractor Handbook | 3
  17. 17. Contractor health, environment, and safety orientation meetings are available to supplement this handbook. The contractor may schedule an orientation by contacting the Chevron person overseeing the work. Remember: Stop-Work Authority It Is Your Responsibility You Have the Authority Zero Is Attainable Your ideas and concerns are important. We always comply with the Tenets of Operational Excellence shown above. As an employee or contractor for Chevron, you are responsible and authorized to stop any work that does not comply with these tenets, and there will be no repercussions to you. That is our commitment to you. Gulf of Mexico Business Unit – GOMBU Deepwater Exploration and Projects Business Unit – DWEP BU 4 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  18. 18. 2.0 Responsibility Overview 2.1 Chevron Employee Responsibilities The following are Chevron employees’ key responsibilities regarding this handbook: • Be aware of the contractor handbook and its requirements. • Ensure that contractors are aware of these expectations and have a copy of the handbook available. • Ensure that all contractors working for Chevron are meeting the expectations presented in the handbook. 2.2 ontractor Responsibilities C The contractor’s company is responsible for the contractor’s employees’ safety and for ensuring that the contractor’s employees perform their day-to-day work in a safe and proper manner. The contractor must read, become familiar with, and follow the contents of this handbook and consult with the contractor’s supervisor if the contractor has any questions about its contents. The contractor must become familiar with Chevron’s requirements and expectations, many of which are presented in this handbook. These guidelines are intended to supplement, not replace, the contractor’s own safety program. If Chevron’s procedures and the contractor’s procedures conflict, the more stringent rule should be followed. 2.3 top-Work Authority S Chevron is committed to following the Tenets of Operational Excellence listed in Section 1.1 at all times. All contractors are authorized to stop and are responsible for stopping any Contractor Handbook | 5
  19. 19. work that does not comply with these tenets. It is Chevron’s commitment that there will be no repercussions upon any contractor for taking such action. The contractor is empowered and expected to stop the work of co-workers, Chevron employees, or other contractors if any person’s safety or the environment are at risk. No repercussions will result from this action. If the contractor, the contractor’s employees, or subcontractors are discouraged from exercising their Stop-Work Authority (SWA) or are penalized for doing so, they should report this action via the Chevron external Gulf of Mexico Contractor Safety website at: https://upstream. chevron.com/contractorgom/ or call the numbers listed below. If a contractor has a concern about a safety or compliance issue, or wishes to provide a suggestion for improvement in these areas, it is critical that the contractor’s comments are heard and any resulting actions are communicated to the contractor. Safety or compliance issues can be communicated in one of these methods: • Notification of supervisor/person in charge: Any safety or compliance issue that arises should be brought to the attention of the Chevron supervisor or representative. Depending on the significance of the item, raising a concern in this manner can be done verbally or in writing. Chevron supervisors should respond to the contractor with a description of how the concern will be resolved. • Notification of BU HES manager: Any safety or compliance issue that has not been resolved or agreed upon by a contractor and respective Chevron supervisor/representative can be raised to the Chevron HES managers. Contractors may leave a phone or 6 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  20. 20. email message, or a letter prefaced by the statement, “I am reporting an HES concern for your review.” This notification can be made anonymously. The HES manager should then review the contractor’s concern and report the outcome of the review to the appropriate BU management. • HES managers can be reached at the following numbers: HES Managers Numbers Greater GOM HES Manager 985-773-6000 Gulf of Mexico BU HES Manager (Covington) 985-773-6000 Deepwater and Exploration Projects BU HES Manager (Houston) 832-854-6000 • Chevron Hotline: If the contractor was unable to resolve the HES issue using both steps and the contractor believes a violation of HES policy or regulation exists, the contractor can call the Chevron Hotline at 1-800-284-3015. Use of the Hotline will prompt an external investigation from personnel outside the respective business unit. Contractor Handbook | 7
  21. 21. 3.0 Chevron Workplace Principles and Policies 3.1 Professional Conduct Chevron respects every individual who works for our company. We expect our employees and contractors to conduct themselves in a professional manner. Horseplay, practical jokes, and harassment are not allowed. No form of harassment or fighting will be tolerated while on locations under Chevron’s operational control. Depending on the severity, additional repercussions, such as involvement of regulatory agencies and law enforcement, may result. 3.2 Contraband: Drugs, Alcohol, Weapons, Pornography Any person under the influence of alcohol, controlled substances, or any intoxicating substance is prohibited from entering company premises, engaging in company business, or operating company equipment; no pornography of any kind may be displayed or stored on Chevron property. Entry into or exit from any Chevron office or work location is provided under the condition of the company’s right to search any person, vehicle, or the personal effects of any employee or contractor for illegal drugs, intoxicating beverages, firearms, weapons, or pyrotechnics (e.g., BIC® lighters). As a safety precaution, and to preclude the loss of Chevron’s tools, materials, or equipment, authorized representatives of Chevron may search those entering, working in, or exiting Chevron locations without prior announcement. Chevron’s drug and alcohol policies and procedures are fully explained in the contractor’s contract. 8 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  22. 22. 3.2.1 Alcohol Chevron prohibits the unauthorized use, possession, distribution, purchase, or sale of alcohol while on company premises, conducting company business, or operating company equipment. 3.2.2 Illegal Drugs Chevron prohibits the use, possession, distribution, purchase, or sale of illegal drugs while on company premises, conducting company business, or operating company equipment. 3.2.3 Prescription Drugs If a contractor brings prescription drugs into a Chevron facility, the medication must be in the bottle or container in which it was originally dispensed and must be prescribed to the individual. The contractor’s employees shall report the use of medication to the supervisor employed by the contractor. That contractor supervisor should report to the Chevron supervisor, in general terms, that one of the contractor’s employees on location is using medication and has reviewed such use with the contractor’s medical sources, and that the contractor’s employee has been cleared for work. If the contractor’s supervisor cannot assure the Chevron supervisor that these steps were taken, or if the worker appears to be impaired or endangering himself or herself or others, said worker may be removed from Chevron premises. Use of a prescription or over-the-counter medication is permitted only if such use does not have side effects Contractor Handbook | 9
  23. 23. that could adversely affect the contractor’s work performance. Contractors should consult with their physician before taking any medications that may interfere with their ability to work safely. Chevron prohibits the use, possession, distribution, purchase, or sale of any controlled substance while on company premises, conducting company business, or operating company equipment. 3.2.4 Internet Prescription Drugs It is unlawful to use a controlled substance or other prescription drug without a valid prescription. A contractor must have a legally valid prescription to take a controlled substance. Under applicable law, an employee must have a doctor- patient relationship with the doctor prescribing the controlled substance. Various state and federal authorities establish that a prescription issued outside a legitimate doctor-patient relationship, such as an “Internet prescription” that is based on an online questionnaire and review by a doctor who has not examined the patient, is invalid. Such prescriptions are also unacceptable under the Department of Transportation’s drug testing regulations. (Interpretive guidance to 49 CFR 40.141.) A contractor who uses or possesses a controlled substance with an invalid prescription is in violation of Chevron’s policy prohibiting controlled substances. 3.2.5 Explosives and Firearms Chevron prohibits the use, possession, transportation, or sale of unauthorized explosives, unauthorized flammable materials, firearms, or other weapons while on company premises, engaged in company business, or operating company equipment. 10 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  24. 24. 3.3 SafeGulf All personnel who work a rotational position in the offshore Gulf of Mexico and all personnel that will or may travel there more than three trips per calendar year are required to be SafeGulf c00ertified. SafeGulf is a program to ensure that all workers in the Gulf of Mexico are trained to a set of minimum requirements for HES awareness. This training is not meant to take the place of regulatory and company training requirements, and additional training may still be required for specialized and regulatory controlled work. Upon arrival at a Chevron shorebase, all personnel must show a government-issued picture ID to enter the shorebase. SafeGulf certification is required for travel to any offshore facility for anyone who travels more than three times a year. Specific details about the content of the SafeGulf training and training providers are available on the SafeGulf website at http://www.safegulf.com. 3.4 Transportation Worker Identification Card Certain Chevron facilities are regulated under the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) of 2002. This act requires Chevron to implement Coast Guard-regulated offshore and shorebase security plans for facilities that meet certain oil, gas, or chemical production or transportation thresholds. A Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC®) is a biometric security credential (card) issued to employees, both Chevron and contractor, who need unescorted access to offshore and shorebase facilities that are required to implement a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Facility Security Plan (FSP). The following guidance applies to TWIC. a) All contractors who are permanently assigned to Chevron’s offshore facilities that have Coast Guard- approved facility security plans must obtain a TWIC. Contractor Handbook | 11
  25. 25. b) All contractors who have the potential to work on or visit Coast Guard-regulated facilities for any purpose and need unescorted access to the facility must obtain a TWIC. c) Employees and contractors without a TWIC may still work and visit Chevron Coast Guard-regulated security facilities, but they must obtain permission from the facility person in charge before arriving because the facility will be required to escort the employee during the visit. (Employees without a TWIC must be escorted by a facility employee who has a TWIC.) As a general rule, GOM facilities are not staffed to provide security escorts and may not be able to accommodate visitors. d) Employees and contractors without a TWIC are required d) to contact the person in charge before arriving to make d) escort arrangements. This also applies to all pilots, including Chevron pilots. If a pilot wants unescorted access to these locations, then they must obtain a TWIC. TWICs for these facilities will be checked at the shorebase and heliport during crew changes and at the facilities as personnel arrive. 3.5 ousekeeping H It is the contractors’ responsibility to keep their work areas clean, orderly, and in a condition conducive to safe work while under Chevron’s operational control. The contractor will: • Keep all work areas, walking surfaces, handrails, equipment, tools, and life-saving and fire-fighting equipment clean and free of obstructions. • Store tools or tie them off, so they do not cause a hazard to people in the surrounding area. • Use only commercial fire-safe solvents for cleaning. A safe solvent is a class IIIA liquid; it has a flash point above 140°F and below 200°F. Prohibited cleaning agents 12 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  26. 26. include, but are not limited to, gasoline, diesel, and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). Questions on appropriate solvents should be directed to the Chevron person in charge. • Segregate wastes, including discarded oily rags, from regular trash. • Use plastic buckets appropriately; they should not contain any hydrocarbons or flammable items. • Appropriately label all loose materials, small tools, and other small objects with the name of the owner before use or transport over offshore waters. • Properly label all containers (e.g., spray bottles, jugs) with name of substance contained. 3.6 Smoking All Chevron buildings and living facilities are designated as “nonsmoking” areas, except for areas specifically designated for smoking. Chevron will provide, or request the contractor to designate, a facility for smoking in a separate building with ventilation to the outside or a separate room with outside ventilation or, if there is no alternative, an appropriate, designated outside smoking area. Smoking is permitted only in designated smoking areas. Smoking is not allowed in any common use area, such as galleys, offices, restrooms, and laundry rooms, unless duplicate “smoke-free” common use facilities are provided. During personnel transport, smoking is not allowed in common use areas, such as passenger seating areas. Smoking is allowed in the wheelhouse of a vessel as long as the area is well ventilated, the secondhand smoke is not circulated throughout the passenger seating area, and there is not a more stringent smoking policy imposed by the vessel owner/operator. Contractor Handbook | 13
  27. 27. 3.7 Fishing Policy Chevron discourages, but does not prohibit, employees and contractors from fishing during nonworking hours while onboard any Chevron offshore facility. Certain facilities, at the supervisor’s discretion, may entirely forbid fishing. Before beginning to fish, employees and contractors must determine if it is permissible to fish at that facility. While fishing, personnel must follow all federal, state, and local jurisdictions’ fishing regulations, along with any Chevron site-specific rules. Fishing regulations may require licenses, possession limits by species or quantity (creel) and size, and cleaning stipulations. 3.8 anguage Requirements L All workers must be able to read or understand the posted warning signs while working at a location under Chevron’s operational control. Except on foreign-flagged vessels such as barges or rigs, one translator will be assigned to each non-English speaker while work is conducted. No more than one non-English speaker will be assigned to a translator. If a translator is needed, the contractor must notify the Chevron work owner, who must notify the field supervisor before work begins. Where crew members predominately speak a language other than English and warning signs are posted in that language, the number of translators required will be determined by the Chevron work owner and documented in a mitigation plan. 3.9 Security Contractor companies shall be responsible for their own equipment and accountable for controlling the actions of their employees while working at locations under Chevron’s operational control. Chevron is not responsible for lost or stolen articles. Contract employees are discouraged from bringing large amounts of cash or other valuables of a financial or personal nature to work sites. If they choose to do so, however, it is their own responsibility to keep these 14 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  28. 28. items adequately secured. Company and contract employees are encouraged to practice good Security Awareness and Vigilance behaviors and alert company personnel to any suspicious persons or witnessed behaviors. Chevron is required by federal regulations to develop and implement plans to address security risks related to transporting and storing hazardous materials. The Chevron Gulf of Mexico Facility Security Plan has identified specific areas of our shorebase and all our offshore facilities as restricted areas that potentially store or transport hazardous materials. Contractors are included in the Facility Security Plan. Part of this plan seeks confirmation of employee information for those who have access to and/or handle hazardous materials. Specifically, contractors who enter restricted areas must show valid, government-issued picture identification, and their company will be required to perform pre-employment background screenings. These screenings must include recent employment history, references, citizenship/alien status, verification of identity, and Social Security participation, as well as a review of any state or federal criminal records. Personnel that are traveling offshore will be required to check in with security at the heliport with a picture ID, and the identification number on that ID is recorded. Please ensure that when traveling to one of the deepwater rigs, you have a current identification card or driver’s license. All contractors who are not U.S. citizens or permanent U.S.-resident aliens possessing an Alien Registration Card (Green Card) will be considered Foreign Nationals (FN) and will have to be cleared by Chevron and the U.S. Coast Guard before being allowed to visit a Chevron facility or travel Contractor Handbook | 15
  29. 29. offshore. Additional details regarding foreign nationals are available in BU-specific processes and procedures. • Prior to an FN contractor’s arrival at any DWEP or GOM facility, the FN contractor’s employer shall notify the Chevron work owner that the contractor is an FN. • Before scheduling a trip to an offshore facility, the FN contractor’s employer shall request the USCG to issue a Letter of Determination (LOD) to the contractor. • Prior to the arrival of an FN contractor at any DWEP or GOM facility, the responsible Chevron work owner shall complete a Chevron North America Exploration and Production (CNAEP) Company Visiting Foreign National Form and send it to the CNAEP Export Control Officer (ECO). • When the FN contractor arrives at the shorebase or airport to go offshore, the contractor shall possess a passport with a valid U.S. visa and a copy of the LOD issued by the USCG. The CNAEP ECO must then clear the contractor. 3.10 Behavior-Based Safety Process Contractor companies are required to have their own behavior-based safety (BBS) process. This process must include: • A data sheet with critical behaviors – Critical behaviors listed on a data sheet (observation card) should be pulled from historical incident data listing behaviors that led to those incidents. • Training on the observation process – Appropriate personnel will be trained on the established observation process. • Feedback after observations – Upon completing an observation, the observer is expected to have a discussion with the observed to give feedback. 16 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  30. 30. • Data collection and trend analysis – The contractor will have a process to collect the data from each observation and perform trend analysis on the data collected. • Action planning – Once trend analysis is complete, the contractor shall create appropriate action plans to address unsafe behaviors. • A step to follow up on action plan – Action plans are carried out over the course of a set time period. Follow-up is necessary to ensure the closure of all actions listed with the action plan. Contractors acting as Chevron representatives are expected to follow the applicable BU BBS process. 3.11 rientation of Visitors at Offshore O ocations L All personnel are required to sign a login sheet when arriving at a Chevron site. When arriving at a Chevron location for the first time, individuals are required to attend an orientation meeting that will cover emergency procedures, including the Emergency Evacuation Plan (EEP) and site-specific information. 3.12 Short-Service Employee Policy A short-service employee (SSE) is any contractor with fewer than six months of experience in the same job type or with the contractor’s present employer. Contractors who quit and return to the same company and the same job type within one year are deemed to satisfy the requirements. Specific policy requirements: Notification • The contractor must complete the SSE form for each –  SSE assigned to perform work at a Chevron location. –  The form must be submitted to the Chevron –  representative who hired the contractor’s –  personnel, and it must be approved 24 hours before –  the SSE arrives on Chevron property. –  Contractor Handbook | 17
  31. 31. The contractor will fax this form to the Chevron –  location supervisor before arriving at the work location if job mobilization is within 24 hours of the request for work. If an SSE for whom an SSE form has not been submitted arrives on Chevron property, the –  onsite Chevron representatives may send the SSE –  back to shore at the contractor’s expense. All SSEs must carry this form on their person at all times while on Chevron property. Chevron SSE crew makeup requirements: • Single-person “crew” cannot be an SSE. –  Two-to-four-person crews can have only one SSE –  per crew. Five-or-more-person crews shall not exceed 20% SSEs. –    Crews with more than 20% SSE personnel are only – permitted upon the submission of a written variance approved by the Chevron representative. Identification • All SSEs must be identified with a high-visibility –  orange hard hat. (This high-visibility color is not the same as orange.) Mentoring • Mentoring Process: The contractor must assign an –  onsite mentor to each SSE. A mentor can be assigned to only one SSE per crew. Each mentor must closely supervise the SSE to ensure that the SSE does not perform tasks for which they are not properly trained. Land transportation contractors exempt from the onsite mentoring requirement. are entoring: Each SSE’s work will be closely –  M monitored for a six-month period. During that period, the SSE must demonstrate a good working knowledge of the contractor’s and Chevron’s HES policies. The contractor may require any employee having a recordable safety incident within this time to repeat the six-month introductory period. 18 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  32. 32. Subcontractors •   – Chevron GOMBU contractors will manage their ubcontractors in alignment with this policy. s Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) Areas •   SSEs are allowed to work within designated – No NORM work areas. 3.12.1 Contractor Short-Service Employee Form The Chevron Contractor SSE Form consists of a section that captures information on the individual SSE and a variance section that will be filled out whenever any element of the SSE Policy (listed above) cannot be met. The information section must be filled out for all SSEs and submitted at least 24 hours before SSE arrival for approval or rejection by the Chevron location supervisor. In the event that a variance is required, it will be filled out and submitted to the Chevron location supervisor who has authority to approve or deny any variances on his location. Approved SSE forms are available on the Chevron external Gulf of Mexico Contractor Safety website at: ttps://upstream.chevron.com/contractorgom/. h Reference is also made to the Marine, Safety, Reliability, and Efficiency (MSRE) Competency Management and SSE Policy Letter for vessel operators and crews. This can be found on the Gulf of Mexico Contractor Safety website at https://upstream.chevron.com/ contractorgom/programs_policies/marine_safety.asp. Contractor Handbook | 19
  33. 33. 3.13 oot Cause Analysis/Incident R nvestigation I Contractors are required to conduct, and in some cases may be asked to lead, a root cause analysis (RCA) team. Root cause analysis investigations are required for: • Any accident resulting in an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-recordable injury. • Any spill of one barrel or greater (GOMBU) and all oil and chemical spills (DWEP BU). • All incidents that exceed national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) guidelines. In addition, DWEP BU requires an RCA for any NPDES sheen, even if the sample passes the lab test, or any NPDES lab test that is above the monthly average. • All fires. • All preventable motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) that take place in a Chevron company car. • Any “near miss” or minor incident that has the potential to result in a serious injury, oil spill, property loss, fire, or MVC. • Incidents that occur frequently, at the request of the GOM management team. • Any significant financial incident. • Marine vessel operators. An incident investigation and root cause analysis is required where a notice of marine casualty, 46 CFR 4.05, requires reporting an incident to the U.S. Coast Guard. RCA investigations shall include, but are not limited to: • A description of the event • A determination of the actual and potential loss or losses • A list of the root causes of the incident • An evaluation of the risk of recurrence 20 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  34. 34. • A list of system controls and/or process changes to reduce the risk of recurrence • A plan to communicate fully any lessons learned All RCAs completed for incidents on Chevron property will be shared with the contractor’s Chevron representative as soon as possible. Chevron may request to participate on all incidents requiring investigations while under operational control. In situations where an incident involves multiple contract companies or contract and Chevron personnel, Chevron may commission a team composed of personnel from all affected companies. Any contractor who has incurred an OSHA-recordable injury or illness while working for the Chevron DWEP or GOMBU must schedule a meeting with the appropriate Chevron vice president or designee to review the details of the incident and any lessons learned. This meeting should be scheduled within a reasonable time frame after the RCA is complete. 3.14 ES Ratings Overview H During the qualification process, contractor work scope will be evaluated by the Supply Chain Management group to determine whether a contractor is required to have an HES rating. Contractors requiring an HES rating will be assigned a rating of A-F based on the following six elements: 1. Total Recordable Incident Rate (TRIR) 2. Safety questionnaire 3. HES audits 4. Field competency verifications 5. Field feedback forms 6. Working relationship Additional information on Chevron’s Contractor Safety Management process may be found at https://upstream. chevron.com/contractorgom/. Contractor Handbook | 21
  35. 35. 3.15 ell Phone Usage While Operating a C otor Vehicle M In accordance with the Chevron Cell Phone Policy, contractors may not use a cell phone while driving or operating heavy equipment while on Chevron locations or while operating a Chevron-owned or -rented vehicle. Contractors are discouraged from other forms of “multitasking,” such as using two-way radios and pagers, eating, or taking notes, while operating a motor vehicle. 3.16 Management Field Visits Strong leadership is a critical success factor for any safety program. Contractor management is required to visit work sites periodically. 3.17 ubcontractors S Primary contractors will be held accountable to ensure that their subcontractors are held to the same standards as their employees. This includes ensuring that subcontractors are qualified to perform the work and are meeting Chevron’s expectations while working under Chevron’s operational control. For ongoing work, the contractor is required to notify the Chevron work owner when the contractor will be using subcontractors. For project proposals, contractors are required to submit a subcontracting plan, including: • Products and services to be subcontracted • Selection criteria to be used to select subcontractors • Plans to ensure HES performance from subcontractors 22 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  36. 36. 4.0 Emergency Procedures 4.1 edical Coverage M Contractors are responsible for providing medical coverage as appropriate for their scope of work. This may range from first aid-trained personnel to licensed paramedics. In the event that medical coverage provided by the contractor is not available, Chevron will take necessary and reasonable steps to ensure that care is provided to contract employees working on Chevron property. Chevron strategically deploys emergency medical responders (EMRs) at various locations in the Gulf of Mexico. Proximity to additional medical support or hospital facilities should be considered when determining appropriate medical coverage. 4.2 Medical Emergency Transportation Process In the event of a medical emergency, the contractor’s Chevron representative will ensure transportation of the injured person to shore. Injured personnel sent in for medical assistance/evaluation should be accompanied to the medical facility. Depending on medical provider availability or severity of injury, a nonmedical provider may accompany the injured party. This person should have the authority from the contractor to authorize treatment for the injured employee (e.g., foreman or supervisor). The contractor’s company should have a representative meet the injured person upon arrival to ensure medical care is appropriately provided. 4.3 Hurricane Evacuation Action Plan Chevron coordinates the safe evacuation of all personnel working on Chevron offshore facilities and shorebases. This Contractor Handbook | 23
  37. 37. includes contract employees working on a Chevron facility. Chevron’s evacuation process and plans are contained in the Chevron GOM Operational Excellence Manual. Contractors are responsible for developing and maintaining plans to: 1. Safely evacuate contract employees who are not working on a Chevron offshore facility or shorebase. 2. Safely secure contractor equipment or assets located or staged at Chevron shorebases. This includes vessels tied at Chevron piers. 3. Safely secure (or move) contractor offshore equipment or assets not located or staged on Chevron offshore facilities. 4.4 Damaged Facility Assessment and Boarding Process Guidelines exist for personnel boarding facilities for the purposes of performing damage assessments, regulatory compliance, or other work on platforms and caissons after storm events or other events that: • May have compromised the structural integrity of the facility or facilities. • May have restricted access/egress to the facility due to damage to boat landings and swing ropes and/or heliports. • May have created safety hazards (open holes, missing handrails, damaged vessels, etc.) on the facility or facilities. • May have created hazards by moving or compromising production equipment. No one shall be allowed on any structure identified as being in a noncompliant condition until a hazard mitigation plan has been prepared and approved by the Operations manager to maximize the safety and security of our employees and contractors as well as anyone who may seek refuge there. 24 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  38. 38. Boarding Assessment personnel may board such facilities only after an Initial Assessment has been done as described in Section 4.4.4 and permission is granted by the Operations supervisor. 4.4.1 acility Status Definitions F 4.4.1.1 Open Facilities that are deemed “Open” are considered open for normal operations and do not require a mitigation plan for boarding. Open facilities must meet the following criteria: • All damaged or hazardous areas are sufficiently mitigated or isolated to Chevron GOM standards including: –  Significant structural damages repaired or deemed safe y engineering analysis b Two functional means of egress –  –  open holes barricaded per GOM Open Hole All standards –  missing and damaged handrails mitigated/ All barricaded to Chevron standards (see Guidelines Guarding Deck Openings) for • Other hazards (spills, loose or hanging items, etc.) cleaned or secured 4.4.1.2 Closed Closed facilities are defined as those for which access to the facility is restricted and/or hazards exist that require one or more persons to mark, barricade, protect, remove, and/or repair the hazard enough to protect personnel and the environment. Closed facilities require a mitigation plan for boarding. This plan must be signed off by the Area Operations manager. Contractor Handbook | 25
  39. 39. 4.4.2 Status Changes Status Changes From Open to Closed Automatic – Facilities will automatically be given the “Closed” status for the following reason: • The facility is in an area that experiences sustained hurricane-force winds. This is the same criterion the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) uses to shut in remote- operated facilities. Discretionary – Facilities may be given the “Closed” status at the discretion of the Operations supervisor, Offshore/Onshore Installation manager (OIM), or Operations manager: • After a significant event that may have compromised safety or structural integrity of the facility. • After a significant issue is identified in a Job Safety Analysis (JSA) review or through the use of Stop-Work Authority. Status Changes From Closed to Open Changes from Closed to Open may occur only after the following is completed: • The facility meets all Open criteria in Section 4.4.1.1. • Operations supervisor approval is obtained. 4.4.3 Damage Assessments In conducting these assessments, care must be taken not o expose ourselves or others to the risks we seek t to identify. 4.4.4 Initial Assessments Initial Assessments are made from either helicopter or boat and do not require a mitigation plan, because the facility ill not be boarded. w 26 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  40. 40. Observations should be made of the following items: Platform (i.e., listing or missing) • Heliports • Boat landings and swing ropes • • Stairways Grating and handrails • • Major piping and production vessels • Spills or sheens In the event the assessment team observes a condition that requires immediate action (i.e., continuing pollution); personnel will relay the situation to the supervisor or manager to discuss actions to be taken. 4.4.5 Boarding Assessments Boarding Assessments will be made with an objective to obtain further damage assessments. Before boarding, personnel must do the following: • Obtain Operations supervisor approval to board facility. • Review the Initial Assessment as part of their JSA and pre-job safety meeting. P • erform a visual assessment to: Confirm Initial Assessment. –  Identify additional hazards/risks. –  Once on board, boarding personnel must do the following: • Actively use the BBS process and Stop-Work Authority. • Visually observe the levels overhead and below before changing levels. Contractor Handbook | 27
  41. 41. • Implement hazard mitigations within their capability (marking, tying-off, barricading open holes, blocking stairwells, top and bottom). Boarding Assessments will recommend facility status Open” or “Closed” as defined in sections 4.4.1.1 as “ and 4.4.1.2. All assessments are to be submitted to the designated coordinator for each area. 4.4.6 Methods to Secure Closed Facilities All facilities that are deemed “Closed” through the assessment process will be secured to prevent access (by employees, contractors, and the general public) to those facilities until they are made safe. Ways to install barriers include, but are not limited to: • emoving or pulling up and tying off all swing ropes as R appropriate aution: Do not leave yourself without egress or C without a way to board under a Boarding Mitigation Plan later. • Installing ocking-out clamps l on all stairways: Leading up from the boat –  landing Leading down from the –  heliport • arking the heliport as closed M as per Chevron Aircraft Operations Guidelines • Posting appropriate signage on Stairway Lockout Clamps 28 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  42. 42. 4.4.7 ccessing Closed Facilities A Access to Closed facilities will only be allowed with the development of a Boarding Mitigation Plan for each specific facility. The Operations manager must approve all Boarding Mitigation Plans for each boarding party. 4.4.8 oarding Mitigation Plans B Boarding Mitigation Plans will be documented on the Boarding Mitigation Plan Template. All mitigation plans will include the following minimal requirements: • boardings must be done by two or more personnel. All single-person boardings are permitted. No • Complete the Permit to Work form and any necessary Safe Work Practices (JSA, Hot Work Permits, Isolation of Hazardous Energy Form, Lifting Plan, Fall Protection and Rescue Plan, etc.) as needed the cope of work to be performed. Review listed for s hazards with personnel boarding the platform. • Communications (company radio, satellite phones, etc.) be maintained while on board. Establish location will and ontact information for nearest emergency c medical esponders. r • Advise the Field Operations supervisor or the designated person in charge (PIC) before boarding tructure. the s • the event additional hazards are found, they will be In mitigated and reviewed with the entire crew before initiating work. • Replace Platform Closed signs any time you depart platform. the 4.4.9 Documentation All Damage Assessments will be documented on the appropriate forms: Initial Assessment Form • Contractor Handbook | 29
  43. 43. Boarding Assessment Form • Boarding Mitigation Plan Template • 4.4.10 Boarding Assessment Personnel • Review this process as part of JSA and pre-planning erforming assessments. for p • Review the hazards identified by the Initial Assessment. Develop a Boarding JSA. • • Obtain Operations supervisor approval to board facility. • Proceed with caution as not all hazards may be readily visible or evident. • Complete the Boarding Assessment Form, and submit to the Operations supervisor. it 4.4.11 perations Representative or O Contract Representative This will normally be the company or contract representative in charge of the person(s) doing the work. This person may be supervising several jobs or could in certain circumstances be the person performing the ask. t • Review this process as part of JSA and pre- planning for performing repairs. • Review the hazards identified by the Initial and Boarding Assessments. • Develop a Boarding Mitigation Plan as necessary and submit to the Operations supervisor for review. • Advise Operations supervisor before boarding facility. • Proceed with caution as not all hazards may be readily visible or evident. 30 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  44. 44. 4.5 Incident Reporting Procedures Incidents are defined as identifiable and unintentional deviations from planned operations, caused by factors that may or may not be within Chevron’s span of control, that result in an injury to an employee or contractor or cause environmental consequences, property damage, or a near miss that could have resulted in any of the above. All incidents, near misses, property damage, spills, releases, fires, harassment, and permit violations must be reported as soon as possible to Chevron personnel. A Chevron incident report must be completed and any statements needed for the report must be taken at that time. Failure to report an incident may result in termination of the contract. Any contractor who has incurred an OSHA-recordable injury or illness while working for the Chevron DWEP or GOM business units must schedule a meeting with the appropriate Chevron vice president or designee to review the details of the incident and any lessons learned. This meeting should be scheduled within a reasonable time frame after the RCA is complete. If an injury classification changes over time, the contractor is required to notify Chevron and update their Management System Questionnaire (MSQ). Failure to do so may result in termination of the contract. 4.6 Oil Spill Response Plan and Notifications Chevron’s emergency management team will coordinate responses to oil or hazardous material (HAZMAT) spills that originate from Chevron offshore and shore-side facilities or assets. This includes complying with government agency planning requirements and notifying the National Response Center (NRC) and all other applicable government agencies of oil and HAZMAT spills that originate from Chevron property or assets. Contractor Handbook | 31
  45. 45. Contractors who observe or discover a spill from a Chevron facility or asset will take the following actions: 1. Safety first – Ensure the safety of all personnel. Anyone who observes the spill should act carefully, cautiously, and reasonably. 2. Notify the contractor’s supervisor and the Chevron person in charge. 3. Control the source – Qualified personnel, when feasible, hould take actions that may include, but are not limited s to: Shutting in the well(s) and/or vessel(s) • • Closing the surface and/or subsurface (automatic or manual) safety device(s) Actuating emergency shutdown (ESD) device(s) • • ctuating blowout prevention (BOP) assembly and well A control system(s) Contractors are responsible for developing oil and HAZMAT response plans that meet agency regulations for spills that originate from their property, facilities, or assets, including vessels. Contractors are therefore responsible for managing and responding to all oil and hazardous material spills that originate from their property, facilities, vessels, or assets. This includes notifying the NRC and other appropriate agencies of oil and hazardous material spills that originate from contractor property or assets, including vessels. 4.7 mergency Response and Drills E Emergency drills are conducted at Chevron facilities in accordance with all applicable laws, regulations, and facility policies. To ensure familiarity with the emergency procedures, Chevron conducts drills as if an actual emergency exists. Contractors are required to participate in all drills. All drilling rigs will schedule, conduct, and record drills for their personnel according to all applicable laws, regulations, and policies. 32 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  46. 46. 5.0 HES Meetings 5.1 Onsite HES Meetings Contractor shall conduct or actively participate in onsite HES meetings as made available, but at least daily. These meetings can include: • Interactively reviewing the Hazard Analysis Standard, which includes JSA/Job Safety Evaluation Assessment (JSEAs), Think Incident Free (TIF), etc., with team • Discussing work to be completed and how to do the work safely • Analyzing lessons learned • Sharing incidents and near misses • Recognition • Conducting a learning exercise • Observing trends and discussing the corrective actions tied to those trends Note: or more information, please review the Hazard F Analysis section. 5.2 Pre-Job HES Meetings Before a new job, at the beginning of each workday, or in the event of a significant operational change, the person in charge must hold a pre-job meeting to discuss job planning, job assignments, the completion of a written Job Safety Analysis, and any unique or unusual project hazards. Contractor Handbook | 33
  47. 47. The person in charge must hold a pre-job meeting: • Before a new job • At the beginning of each work day • In the event of a significant operational change These meetings should contain, but not be limited to: J • ob planning • Job assignments • Completion of written JSA • Any unique or unusual project hazards 34 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  48. 48. 6.0 Personal Protective Equipment 6.1 General All personnel working for Chevron will wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as determined by the Hazard Analysis. It is the responsibility of each contract company to provide PPE required by the specific task being performed, the potential hazards to which the person will be exposed, and the specifics of the job site. Contractors must adhere to the minimum PPE requirements recommended on the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for material they are handling. 6.2 Fee for Arriving Without Appropriate PPE If, upon arrival at a Chevron facility, a contractor does not have the appropriate PPE for the job requested, Chevron may either, at its discretion: • Send the contractor back to retrieve the appropriate equipment at the contractor’s expense. • Provide replacement PPE for a fee of $100 per item. Chevron will deduct this charge from the invoice for the completed work. 6.3 Head Protection • Contractors must wear a hard hat when working in field perations. o • Contractors must V-Guard Shock-Guard maintain and replace the hat’s uspension system, s as eeded. n • No one is to alter (drill, rivet, or paint to change the design) hard hats in any way. Contractor Handbook | 35
  49. 49. • Hard hats must be made of nonmetallic material and must comply with ANSI standard Z89.1 (or any successor standard). • Contractors must wear their hard hats squarely on their head and not cocked to one side or turned in a reverse position. • Welding hard hats must be provided during welding operations where overhead hazards are present. The only exception to this guideline is when the welding hard hat poses a hazard to welders due to body positioning while performing their work. This exception to the policy, along ith explanation, must be documented on the Hot w Work ermit and noted on the JSA with all potential P hazards mitigated. 6.4 Eye Protection Safety eyewear, clear (for night operations) or tinted, is mandatory for all personnel in field operations (including visitors) and must be worn outside of quarters and office buildings: • All safety eyewear (prescription and nonprescription) must have side shields or wraparound protection that meets ANSI standard Z87.1. • Safety eyewear will meet ANSI standard Z87.1. (The notation Z87 should be on the frames or temples of the safety eyewear.) This includes prescription eyewear used as the only source of eye protection. • Personnel should always shield their eyes from the arc’s rays, including reflected rays from another surface, such as the water. In addition, personnel must wear goggles when helping or working near welders. 36 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  50. 50. • Safety eyewear other than safety glasses may be required for certain tasks, according to the following chart; choose he most appropriate shade number from the t list for the particular activity. Welding Operation Minimum Shade Number Shielded metal-arc welding, up to 5/32-in. electrodes 10 Shielded metal-arc welding, 3/16- to 1/4-in. electrodes 12 Shielded metal-arc welding, over 1/4-in. electrodes 14 Gas metal-arc welding (nonferrous) 11 Gas metal-arc welding (ferrous) 12 Gas tungsten-arc welding 12 Atomic hydrogen welding 12 Carbon arc welding 14 Torch soldering 2 Torch brazing 3 or 4 Light cutting, up to 1 in. 3 or 4 Medium cutting, 1 to 6 in. 4 or 5 Heavy cutting, over 6 in. 5 or 6 Gas welding (light), up to 1/8 in. 4 or 5 Gas welding (medium), 1/8 to 1/2 in. 5 or 6 Gas welding (heavy), over 1/2 in. 6 or 8 Contractor Handbook | 37
  51. 51. 6.4.1 Selecting Eye Protection Eye protection equipment must meet ANSI standard Z87.1 (or any successor regulation). The following table is a guide for selecting eye protection. Type of Work (Activity Group) Possible Danger to the Eyes Minimum Eye Protection Needed 1. Acetylene – burning, cutting, or welding • Sparks 1. Welding helmet with appropriate tinted lenses AND safety glasses or goggles OR 2. Electric (arc) welding • Ultraviolet rays • Molten metal • Flying particles OR 2. Face shield with tinted-plate lenses AND safety glasses or goggles OR 3. Welding goggles, eyecup type, with tinted* lenses, AND face shield OR 4. Goggles, coverspec type with tinted* lenses or tinted-plate lenses, AND face shield * Shade V or current OSHA standard 38 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  52. 52. Type of Work (Activity Group) Possible Danger to the Eyes Minimum Eye Protection Needed 1. Bleeding down a pressure line or vessel • Flying particles 1. Chemical goggles AND face shield OR • Hydrocarbon splash/spray 2. Changing a choke 1. Chemical handling • Chemical splash OR • Acid burns 2. Laboratory • Fumes OR • Glass breakage 3. Paint handling, mixing, pouring • Splash OR 2. Goggles, flexible fitting, regular ventilation, AND face shield 1. Chemical goggles AND face shield OR 2. Goggles, flexible fitting, regular ventilation, AND face shield May require hooded ventilation. Follow current MSDS guidance. 1. Chipping Flying particles OR 2. Grinding OR 3. Wire brushing OR 1. Face shield AND either goggles (flexible fitting, regular ventilation) or safety glasses OR 2. Full sandblasting hood with inner and outer shield (option for paint operations) 4. Power tool cleaning the rust off steel for painting operations Goggles provide more protection Contractor Handbook | 39
  53. 53. Type of Work (Activity Group) Possible Danger to the Eyes Minimum Eye Protection Needed from impact than safety glasses and are the preferred and HESrecommended choice over normal safety glasses under the face shield in these operations. 1. Fire watch (welding) OR 2. Confined entry watch • Flying particles 1. Safety Glasses • Splash/spray 2. Goggles, flexible fitting, with regular ventilation Note: Varies with work activity. OR OR 3. Face shield AND safety glasses or goggles Note: Determined by hazard analysis of work done and proximity of fire watch to the work performed. 1. Sandblasting Flying particles 1. Sandblasting hood with inner shield Note: Sandblasting hoods have an outer shield and an inner shield that protects the eyes even when changing the outer shield. 40 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  54. 54. Type of Work (Activity Group) Possible Danger to the Eyes Minimum Eye Protection Needed 1. Painting (using a paint gun) Spray 1. Roll-film googles, such as Advanz A-030 or equivalent These offer unique eye protection for spray painting applications. When spray paint accumulates and obstructs vision, the painter simply turns the knob, advancing the film and clearing the vision. OR 2. Full sandblasting hood with inner and outer shield 1. Painting (using paint brush or roller) Splash 1. Face shield and goggles or safety glasses OR 2. Roll-film goggles, such as Advanz A-030 or equivalent OR 3. Full sandblasting hood with inner and outer shield Contractor Handbook | 41
  55. 55. Type of Work (Activity Group) Possible Danger to the Eyes Minimum Eye Protection Needed 1. Water cleaning using water hose 0 to 100 psi) • Splash/spray 1. Goggles 1. Low pressure washing (100 to 10,000 psi) • Splash/spray • Flying particles • Flying particles OR 1. Face shield AND goggles OR 2. Full sandblasting hood with inner and outer shield 2. Ultra-high pressure washing (10,000 to 40,000 psi or higher) 1. Hot fueling/ rapid refueling of helicopters OR 2. Face shield and goggles or safety glasses Splash/spray 1. Goggles, flexible fitting, regular ventilation 6.5 Contact Lenses Contractors wearing contact lenses must follow these guidelines for eye protection in addition to those listed in the previous table: • Inform the contractor’s supervisor when you are wearing contact lenses. • Do not wear contact lenses in areas where there is potential exposure to a welding arc. 42 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  56. 56. • Wear soft or gas-permeable lenses. • Have a spare pair of contact lenses or prescription glasses readily available to you. 6.6 oot Protection F Safety footwear is mandatory in field operations. Open-toed shoes, such as sandals, slippers, Crocs®, and flipflops are unsuitable footwear when on the work site or using Chevron helicopters and crew boats. • Visitors and employees not actually involved in daily field operations, such as helicopter pilots and Office Assistants (OAs), are not required to wear safety footwear. • Types of safety footwear allowed: –  ace-up, slip-on, or side-zipper leather shoes or boots L with steel toe –  Western-style boots (provided the heel is not excessively high) with steel toe –  Leather tennis shoes with steel toe –  Steel-toed rubber boots –  Synthetic leather boots (for drilling completions) • Types of safety footwear not allowed: –  eep lug sole and hiking styles D –  Shoes with crepe pattern soles or smooth leather soles –  Narrow-throated boots –  High-heeled footwear (heel in excess of one inch) –  Footwear constructed of materials other than leather, synthetic leather, or rubber Contractor Handbook | 43
  57. 57. 6.7 and Protection H Appropriate gloves must be worn when the contractor’s hands are exposed to hazards, such as cuts, punctures, or abrasions (cloth, cutresistant, leather, or leather-palmed gloves), when handling chemicals or hazardous materials where absorption is a concern (rubber gloves), and when performing electrical work (certified gloves for electrical work). • Welding-Specific: Flameproof gauntlet gloves must be used during all arc welding, gas welding, or gas cutting operations, except when engaged in light work, such as test-fitting pieces. • Rigging-Specific: Gloves must be worn when performing rigging duties. • Galley/Cooking: All galley personnel who use knives during food preparation are required to wear cut-resistant gloves. The contractor will provide procedures for cleaning and disinfecting these gloves. –  Only countertop electric knife sharpeners will be permitted for use in galleys and kitchens under Chevron’s operational control. • Divers are required to wear KEVLAR® gloves. • Personnel using fixed or locking blade knives must wear KEVLAR or leather gloves. –  If a knife is the appropriate tool for the job, the employee’s company is expected to provide the fixed or locking blade knife and maintain it for that specific task. A JSA must be completed before its use. 44 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  58. 58. • Company and contract personnel are not allowed to carry ocketknives with them at offshore locations. In p lieu f a ocketknife, an alternative cutting device must o p be sed and provided by the contractor (e.g., wire cutters u are an ppropriate alternative cutting device for cutting a ty-wraps). 6.7.1 Examples of Non-Chemical Types of Hand Protection Type of Hand Protection Possible Uses for This Type of Hand Protection (Photos are NOT for ordering purposes, only examples) Anti-vibration gloves • Protection for highly specialized tasks such as operating chainsaws, grinders, nail guns, sanders, and any machinery that produces high levels of vibrations or where the individual is exposed to excess vibration • These gloves provide extra padding to help prevent hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) that often occurs from repeated exposure to vibration. Cut-resistant gloves • Cut-resistant gloves are used when workers are at risk to be sliced or cut by equipment or the products they are handling. Contractor Handbook | 45
  59. 59. Type of Hand Protection Possible Uses for This Type of Hand Protection (Photos are NOT for ordering purposes, only examples) Electrical hazard gloves • Electrician gloves are used to protect against electrical shock that could result from an accidental contact with energized electrical equipment. • Consult your Electrical Safe Work Practice advisor for more information. Reference Standard: Rubber insulating gloves (ANSI Standard J6.6-1967) should be used at all times when working on general electric equipment, elevators, branch circuits and switches, emergency power systems, and solar photovoltaic systems, etc. High-visibility gloves Are available in safety orange or lime colors and come in day or nighttime versions. Nighttime versions have retro-reflective patches or elements to reflect light beams (used by flaggers or for communicating hand signals). 46 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  60. 60. Type of Hand Protection Possible Uses for This Type of Hand Protection (Photos are NOT for ordering purposes, only examples) Kong These are best used when handling pipe and larger items where less dexterity is needed (i.e., drilling operations). They are well designed and protect the hand from: • Hairline fractures • Bruising blows • Pinched fingers Leather gloves For protection from rough objects, sparks and heat, and for cushioning from blows in heavy-duty work. All kinds of leather provide comfort, durability, dexterity, mild heat resistance, and abrasion protection. These advantages make leather a traditional favorite for industrial workers. Leather-palmed gloves Provide maximum protection against abrasive and puncture hazards of the palm area only. In most cases, other areas of the glove are thin for more dexterity. Contractor Handbook | 47
  61. 61. Type of Hand Protection Possible Uses for This Type of Hand Protection (Photos are NOT for ordering purposes, only examples) Mechanics’ style gloves These gloves are designed to be thin, which allows for high dexterity, and are very durable. This is a generic catch-all name for an all-purpose glove; there is a variety of versions and different looks. Note: Not liquid-proof. Welding gloves Made of leather with heat-resistant panels. A special feature of effective welding gloves is fully welted seams, some sewn with KEVLAR fibers, which are five times stronger than steel and are flame- and heat-resistant. These fibers protect the seams from degeneration due to exposure to abrasion, heat, sparks, or flames. Note: Make sure you ask the right questions when selecting a glove for a particular application. Using the right glove for the task is worth the investment compared to potential hand injuries. 48 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  62. 62. 6.7.2 Examples of Chemical Hand Protection The material on the following list is only intended to provide an verview of the chemical protective o glove categories. Remember, coated gloves (i.e., chemical- or liquid-proof/ resistant gloves) are available in a few versions: • ull-coverage for complete liquid-proof or chemical- F proof protection • alm, finger, and fingertip coverage for a breathable P glove • Palm, fingertip, and knuckle coverage Type of Gloves (Photos are NOT for ordering purposes, only examples) Possible Uses for This Type of Hand Protection Latex rubber Is an inexpensive, waterproof glove that works well but has limitations. It will, however, blister and separate or peel off in thin layers when in contact with petroleum-based products. Best used during first aid and food preparation. Nitrile rubber (NBR) Resists grease, oil, and other petroleum-based products and is water-resistant or waterproof (if fully coated). Contractor Handbook | 49
  63. 63. Type of Gloves (Photos are NOT for ordering purposes, only examples) Possible Uses for This Type of Hand Protection Both PVC and neoprene Offer excellent chemical-resistant properties. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves frequently are used in the petrochemical industry. Neoprene gloves provide excellent chemical resistance to a broad range of hazardous chemicals, including acids, alcohols, oils, and inks. Although neoprene gloves can offer good grip, they generally are thicker and heavier. Polyurethane Provides extra abrasion resistance and extended wear. The coating does provide waterproof protection but only limited chemical resistance. Polyvinyl alcohol-coated (PVA) PVA gloves are nearly inert to strong solvents, including aromatics, aliphatics, and chlorinated solvents, chemicals which quickly deteriorate, natural rubber, neoprene, and PVC gloves. PVA also offers good resistance to snags, punctures, abrasion, and cuts. Caution: PVA coating is water-soluble. Do not use in water or water-based solutions. 50 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  64. 64. Note: Make sure that on the glove the coating is resistant to the types of chemicals that are present. Select glove material based on the manufacturer’s product literature to determine the gloves’ effectiveness against specific work place chemicals and conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy Occupational Safety and Health Technical Reference Manual rates various gloves as protective against specific chemicals and will help you select the most appropriate gloves to protect your employees. You can find the glove ratings on Table 4 Chemical Resistance Selection Chart for Protective Gloves at http://www.osha.gov/ Publications/osha3151.html/. 6.8 Hearing Protection Contractors will provide hearing protection to their personnel and ensure they are worn whenever those employees work in areas requiring hearing protection, such as: I • n posted areas and on helicopters I • n high-noise areas 6.9 Protective Clothing This policy applies to ALL company and contract personnel (including mechanics, electricians, operators, facility representatives, construction representatives, drill representatives, drilling contractors, etc.) who work on, in, or around production areas/equipment or drilling equipment. Contractor Handbook | 51
  65. 65. Tour groups/visitors (for other than crew change purposes) are required to wear long sleeves. Exceptions to this policy for visitors will be at the discretion of the onsite person in charge. This policy DOES NOT apply to: • Personnel who work in the field office or bunkhouse (including OAs and catering personnel) • Personnel passing through production areas in the process of crew change (including boat and vessel rews) c Contractors must observe the following clothing standards at offshore work locations while working around production equipment or outside quarters: • All-cotton, long-sleeved, button-up shirts and long pants. Overalls, coveralls with zippers, and jeans are acceptable, as long as they are all cotton. • Synthetic garments, such as polyester, nylon, or rayon, may not be worn. • Clothing shall be orderly – no holes, tears, frayed, or loose material – and fit appropriately, with sleeves rolled down and shirttails tucked into trousers. • Rings, necklaces, and other loose jewelry, including exposed body piercings are prohibited when working in areas where they could catch on moving objects or sharp protrusions or come in contact with electrical circuits. –  Watches may be acceptable if protected by the employee’s long sleeves. However, they must meet Chevron’s GOM Daily Non-Welding Hot Work Permit requirements (e.g., powered by no more than two button-type batteries). • Suitable protective clothing (specified on current MSDS/ JSA) will be worn when handling chemicals or hazardous substances. 52 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  66. 66. • Clothing and shoes saturated with petroleum products or chemicals will be removed immediately to prevent skin irritation and possible ignition. • Rain gear is acceptable as an outer layer in appropriate weather conditions. 6.9.1 Fire-Resistant Clothing Contractors will provide Fire-Resistant Clothing (FRC), and PPE to their personnel and ensure they are worn based upon the incident energy exposure associated with the specific task. At a minimum, FRC is required for all contractor electricians and automation specialists working on Chevron facilities. FRC selected by a contractor must provide for electrical arc protection. INDURA® or EXCEL-FR™ brands are acceptable. FRC may be required for non-electrical contractors who perform certain duties with a high risk of flash fires. For high-voltage applications, additional requirements are listed in the Chevron Electrical Safe Work Practice Manual. Consult a Chevron representative for more details. 6.10 Respiratory Protection Contractor companies whose personnel perform work requiring respiratory protection are required to have a documented respiratory protection program in place. The contractor company must ensure that their personnel are properly trained, medically cleared, and fit-tested, and that the program is properly implemented. Contractor Handbook | 53
  67. 67. 6.11 ersonal Flotation Devices P USCG-approved Type I life preservers or Type V or Type III/V work vests are required at all times over water locations. USCG Type I life preservers are provided by Chevron for emergency situations and during emergency drills. Type I life preservers are typically stored in orange boxes at facility muster sites and near primary means of egress. It is the responsibility of the contractor company to provide their employees with U.S. Coast Guardapproved Type V or Type III/V work vests as needed. Type V work vest Type III/V work vest All personal flotation devices (PFDs) must be securely fastened, fit snugly, and be in good condition. PFDs must be worn during the following activities: • When transferring to or from any watercraft (by swing rope, personnel basket, or gangway) • Outside the cabin or wheelhouse of a watercraft (including barges) • When riding in an open or semi-open watercraft • When entering the water to perform work (diving operations excluded) • Any other time deemed necessary by the vessel captain or IC P • Accessing areas below the sump deck 54 | GOMBU and DWEP BU
  68. 68. • When working on the boat landing or Plus 10 level when not surrounded by guardrails Only Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved inflatable PFDs are provided in, and shall be worn on, all helicopters. 6.12 PPE During After-Hours All personnel working for Chevron will wear appropriate PPE during after-hours if outside the galley and living quarters. Contractor Handbook | 55
  69. 69. 7.0 Transportation 7.1 Marine Transportation These guidelines apply to contractor personnel and equipment transported by a vessel under charter to Chevron. • Safe operation of a vessel chartered to Chevron is the exclusive duty of the captain and owner of the vessel. • Only properly licensed captains employed by the vessel owner will operate and navigate vessels under charter to Chevron. Only qualified personnel who hold the appropriate licenses, if required, will operate all other vessels used in Chevron’s field operations. • The captain of the vessel will refuse to allow persons not adhering to the PFD rules to board a vessel. • The captain of the vessel will ensure that the cargo is properly positioned and secured on the vessel before leaving our facilities. Fastening equipment for securing cargo on marine vessels will be furnished by the marine company. The only acceptable chain binders are the cam-lock safety binders or the ratchet-type binders. Single lever, boomer-type binders are prohibited. The captain of the vessel has final authority to refuse to transport any cargo not properly secured. • The captain of the vessel has the authority to refuse passage to anyone considered an unsafe passenger. • The captain of the vessel can refuse transportation of any hazardous materials that have not been properly identified, classified, named, packaged, marked, labeled, and manifested. 56 | GOMBU and DWEP BU

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