Futurism

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Futurism

  1. 1. Art History 2 UST CFAD Asst. Prof. G. Malihan
  2. 2.
  3. 3. <ul><li>The futurists, a group of Italian artists working between 1909 and 1916, shared Fernand Léger's enthusiasm for technology, but pushed it even further. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Filippo Marinetti's first manifesto of futurism appeared in 1909 , until the end of World War I. </li></ul><ul><li>Futurists embraced all that glorified new technology and mechanization and decried anything that had to do with tradition. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Celebration of the machine age, glorifying war and favoring the growth of fascism. </li></ul><ul><li>Futurists declared a speeding automobile to be more beautiful than an ancient Greek statue. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Painting and sculpture were especially concerned with expressing movement and the dynamics of natural and man-made forms. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Some of these ideas, including the use of modern materials and technique, were taken up later by Marcel Duchamp (French, 1887-1968), the cubists, and the constructivists. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Music Revolt 1911 Luigi Russolo (1885-1947)
  9. 9. Dinamismo di un treno 1912 Luigi Russolo (1885-1947)
  10. 10. Giacomo Balla, Abstract Speed — The Car has Passed , 1913 oil on canvas, 50.2 x 65.4 cm, Tate Gallery, London.
  11. 11. Joseph Stella (American, 1877-1946), Battle of Lights, Coney Island c. 1913-14 oil on canvas, 39 x 29 1/2 inches
  12. 12. Carlo Carrà (Italian, 1881-1966) Funeral of the Anarchist Galli 1911, oil on canvas, 6 feet 6 1/4 inches x 8 feet 6 inches
  13. 13. Umberto Boccioni Unique Forms of Continuity in Space 1913, cast 1972, bronze, 117.5 x 87.6 x 36.8 cm, Tate Gallery, London.
  14. 14. Henry Moore
  15. 15. Marc Chagall Homage to Apollinaire 1911-13
  16. 16.
  17. 17. <ul><li>Russian artistic and architectural movement that was first influenced by Cubism and Futurism </li></ul><ul><li>Generally considered to have been initiated in 1913 with the “painting reliefs”—abstract geometric constructions—of Vladimir Tatlin. </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>Russian sculptors Antoine Pevsner and Naum Gabo joined Tatlin and his followers in Moscow. </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Upon publication of their jointly written Realist Manifesto in 1920 they became the spokesmen of the movement. </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>It is from the manifesto that the name Constructivism was derived. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the directives that it contained was “to construct” art. </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>aim was to construct abstract sculpture suitable for an industrialized society, </li></ul><ul><li>work pioneered the use of modern technology and materials such as wood, glass, plastics and steel. </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>introduced to Western Europe by Antoine Pevsner in Paris, and his brother Naum Gabo in Germany. </li></ul><ul><li>principles of Constructivism were highly influential in twentieth century Western art, although for political reasons its influence in Russia ended by 1921. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Female Model 1910 Vladimir Tatlin
  24. 24. Fishmonger 1911 Model for the 3rd International Tower 1919-1920 Vladimir Tatlin
  25. 25. Painterly Architectonic Portrait of a Philosopher Cubist Construction Lyubov Povova
  26. 26. Monde Vision spectrale   Antoine Pevsner
  27. 27. Construction dans l'espace   Antoine Pevsner
  28. 28. Fresco, Fauna of the Ocean 1944
  29. 29. Antoine Pevsner (French, born Russia, 1886-1962) Maquette of a Monument Symbolising the Liberation of the Spirit 1952, bronze, 18 x 18 x 11 1/2 inches (4.6 x 4.6 x 29.5 cm) Tate Gallery, London.
  30. 30. Model for 'Constructed Torso', 1917, reassembled 1981, cardboard, 39.5 x 29.0 x 16.0 cm, Tate Gallery, London. Head No. 2, 1916, enlarged version 1964 Corten steel, 175.3 x 134.0 x 122.6 cm Tate Gallery, London. Naum Gabo
  31. 31.
  32. 32. <ul><li>Based on the theory that color provides the basis for both form and content. </li></ul><ul><li>Conceived in Paris shortly before World War I by Morgan Russell  and Stanton MacDonald-Wright . </li></ul>
  33. 33. <ul><li>Russell’s idea that paintings could be created based on sculptural forms interpreted two-dimensionally through a knowledge of color properties. </li></ul>
  34. 34. <ul><li>Stressed emphasis on color rhythms </li></ul><ul><li>Employed pure colors in harmonious abstract arrangement. </li></ul><ul><li>Composed of abstract shapes, often concealing the submerged forms of figures </li></ul>
  35. 35. <ul><li>Developed by painters Morgan Russell (American, 1886-1953) and Stanton MacDonald-Wright (American, 1890-1973), first exhibited in Paris in 191 </li></ul>
  36. 36. Cosmic Synchromy Synchromy in Blue-Violet Morgan Russell (1886-1953)
  37. 37. Stanton MacDonald-Wright (1890-1973)
  38. 38. Oriental Synchromy Stanton MacDonald-Wright (1890-1973)
  39. 39. Still Life wit Cyclamen and Fruit The Jade Flute No. 2 Stanton MacDonald-Wright (1890-1973
  40. 40.
  41. 41. <ul><li>Radical English art movement, led by Wyndham Lewis and named by the poet Ezra Pound in 1914. </li></ul>
  42. 42. <ul><li>Lewis, EdwarWadsworth, Gaudier-Brzeska and others exhibited together in Brighton in 1913, presenting their work as and in 'The Cubist Room'. </li></ul>
  43. 43. <ul><li>In 1914 they published their first polemical year-book, BLAST </li></ul>
  44. 44. <ul><li>In 1915 they showed in London the Vorticist Exhibition which included several large paintings that are now lost. Essentially urban in its taste for hard, clear forms, </li></ul>
  45. 45. <ul><li>Expressed great impatience with all Victorianism and all revivalism and sought to out-do the Post-Impressionist and Fauve modernism </li></ul><ul><li>Attempted to embrace industrial dynamism as the central concern </li></ul>
  46. 46. <ul><li>According to Ezra Pound, it represented &quot;the point of maximum energy,&quot; which he saw as the essential characteristic of modern life. </li></ul>
  47. 47. <ul><li>Related to Cubism and Futurism, and like those movements, its momentum was greatly depleted by World War I (1914-1919). </li></ul>
  48. 48. <ul><li>Centered on hard edges and angles, as seen in Cubism, applied to powerful machinery and massive structures. </li></ul>
  49. 49. Dancing Figures 1914   Wyndham Lewis
  50. 50. Wyndham Lewis (English, 1882-1957) Planners: Happy Day, 1912-3 pen, gouache and pencil on paper
  51. 51. Lawrence Atkinson (English, 1873-1931) The Lake, c. 1915-20 pen and watercolor on paper, 25.4 x 36.8 cm Tate Gallery, London
  52. 52. Vorticist Landscape: Forest Scene, Lewes, Sussex 1913 Edward Wadsworth English Painter 1889-1949
  53. 53. Taube 1916   Christopher Nevinson (English Painter, 1889–1946)
  54. 54. The interval before Round Ten  William Roberts (British Painter, 1895-1980)
  55. 55. Vision of Ezekiel 1912  David Bomberg
  56. 56. Red Stone Dancer 1913 Femme Assise 1914   Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (1891–1915, French sculptor

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