Introduction to Multi Sensory Taste Perception

4,553 views
4,136 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,553
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
488
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
161
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • It is responsible for sensation in the face and certain motor functions such as biting, chewing, and swallowing. 
  • Cornell have been using the flavor of peppermints as a substitute of PROP in measuring taste sensitivity, because peppermint flavor is more pleasant, and measures more aspects of flavor. The response to peppermint involves not only taste (for the sweetness), but also smell, and sensitivity to trigeminal activation (= the cool feeling of mint). Most foods present some combination of these sensations, so we believe that testing with peppermints reflects general flavor sensitivity. When we test with peppermint, we score the intensity of the "rush" of sensation people may get in the back of the throat and the nose as well as the intensity of flavor. This rush of sensation is due to the activation of the trigeminal nerve endings in the taste buds and in the nosesucrose for sweet senstivity, citric acid for sour sensitivity, and of course sodium chloride for salt senstivity. 
  • Cornell have been using the flavor of peppermints as a substitute of PROP in measuring taste sensitivity, because peppermint flavor is more pleasant, and measures more aspects of flavor. The response to peppermint involves not only taste (for the sweetness), but also smell, and sensitivity to trigeminal activation (= the cool feeling of mint). Most foods present some combination of these sensations, so we believe that testing with peppermints reflects general flavor sensitivity. When we test with peppermint, we score the intensity of the "rush" of sensation people may get in the back of the throat and the nose as well as the intensity of flavor. This rush of sensation is due to the activation of the trigeminal nerve endings in the taste buds and in the nosesucrose for sweet senstivity, citric acid for sour sensitivity, and of course sodium chloride for salt senstivity. 
  • Cornell Uni study found that children are more sensitive than their parents ...this may explain why many children are often picky eaters! Here is a graph showing the differences between children ages 3-5 years and their parents in their mean responses to PROP. The vertical scale shows the intensity of the response - the higher the number, the more intense the response.
  •  Data presented by LL Cavalli-Sforza and his colleagues in The History and Geography of Human Genes,
  • taste sensitivities tend to approach decision-making in differing ways, even problems concerning issues that have nothing to do with flavor or food!In other words they become absorbed in and take pleasure from VISUAL experiences. Coupled with this visual absorption and pleasure is a tendency to experience vivid memories.The reason for these differences may come from the fact that taste, smell, and trigeminal sensations all reach the same area on the right side of the brain
  • In a classic experiment, French researchers colored a white wine red with an odorless dye and asked a panel of wine experts to describe its taste. The connoisseurs described the wine using typical red wine descriptors rather than terms they would use to evaluate white wine, suggesting that the color played a significant role in the way they perceived the drink.
  • In a classic experiment, French researchers colored a white wine red with an odorless dye and asked a panel of wine experts to describe its taste. The connoisseurs described the wine using typical red wine descriptors rather than terms they would use to evaluate white wine, suggesting that the color played a significant role in the way they perceived the drink.
  • When the frequency was turned up, the Pringles seemed much crunchier; when it was turned down, they seemed softer.
  • Adaption; music in the car, hot water,
  • Introduction to Multi Sensory Taste Perception

    1. 1. Introduction to Multi-Sensory Taste Perception
    2. 2. ‘Cooking is probably the most multisensual art. I try to stimulate all the senses.’ (Ferran Adrià, El Bulli)
    3. 3. “ Neuroscientists have come to realise that their insights, from studies of the multisensory integration can be extended to help explain flavour perception Psychology and cognitive neuroscience can help create novel flavours, taste sensations and dining experiences that can more effectively stimulate the mind, and not just the mouth, of the consumer”Professor Charles Spence head of the Crossmodal ResearchLaboratory based at the Department of ExperimentalPsychology, Oxford University
    4. 4. Areas of Interest• How all the senses play their own roles in our appreciation of food• How our enjoyment of food is affected by other influences, our environment, our mood, how it is presented, who prepares it, etc.
    5. 5. Taste Perception
    6. 6. Perception of Flavour
    7. 7. One thing is certain, we all find it extremely difficult to distinguish between tastes and smells
    8. 8. The Ventriloquist In Your Mouth• When bacon and egg ice-cream was first created, it was only moderately pleasant• The breakthrough came when a piece of crispy fried bread was added to the plate• It appears as though the bacon is ‘ventriloquised’ towards, and hence becomes perceptually localised within, the crispy bread, while the eggy flavour stays behind in the more texturally appropriate soft ice-cream
    9. 9. Aroma Sensitivity• Humans remarkable sense of smell• We can distinguish a diversity of odors- approximately 10,000 scents• Scent through the back of the mouth is called retronasal olfaction• Scents via the nostrils it is called orthonasal olfaction
    10. 10. Taste Sensitivity• Taste sensitivity refers to the intensity with which you perceive tastes and flavors• People with high taste sensitivity experience tastes, and usually smells, too, as being very strong• They are also able to distinguish individual flavors in a mixture very wellMeasuring Taste Sensitivity• People who have the active gene will taste the bitterness of PROP, whereas people who have an inactive gene will not taste anything• The more taste buds you have; the stronger the taste signal your brain receives, whether from PROP or from natural food• The more attentive you are to a stimulus, the stronger it may seem
    11. 11. Taster TypesMildly sensitive tasters Moderately sensitive Highly sensitive tasters tasters Weak to undetectable Moderate to strong Very strong sensationsensation from PROP and sensation from PROP and from PROP and mint mint mintThe flavor of food is not The flavor of food is The flavor of food is that important important important Many foods liked; few Many foods liked; few Great variation in the foods disliked; not foods disliked; often number of foods liked; passionate about food passionate about food often passionate about food
    12. 12. • Mildly sensitive • Moderately • Highly sensitive taster sensitive taster taster • This tongue is• The fungiform • The fungiform covered with papillae are the papillae on this fungiform small pinkish dots tongue are larger papillae. on this tongue and more rounded than those of a • Note that this tongue does not• Note that they are mildly sensitive have any blue small and seed- taster areas like those in shaped the other tongues
    13. 13. Taste Changes With Age
    14. 14. The Geography of TasteMap shows the prevalence of the ability to taste a prop The darker the area in this map the higher the percentage of the native population of the area who can taste PTC Over 85% in the darkest areas, and as low as 5% in the lightest.
    15. 15. Taste Smell and Reasoning• Mildly sensitive tasters tend rely more on logical reasoning to arrive at decisions than do other tasters• Moderately sensitive tasters are more likely to "play things by ear" and improvise• Highly sensitive tasters tend to spend time mulling things over, often "sleeping" on a problem if it is complex• Strong tasters of PROP, and people who sense coolness when they taste mints, say : – The crackle of flames of a wood fire stimulate my imagination – My thoughts often dont occur as words but as visual images – I like to watch cloud shapes change in the sky – I can be deeply moved by a sunset.
    16. 16. Food Stimulates all our senses
    17. 17. We have to know what we are eating• We also need to react emotionally•Do we like it? is it poison? Should we enjoy it or spit it out?• Flavor messages go to the emotional centers
    18. 18. Sensory Dominance• Many studies published over the last 75 years have shown that visual cues (especially those concerned with a food or drink’s colour) can have a profound effect on both the sensory- discriminative and hedonic aspects of multisensory flavour perception
    19. 19. The pleasure of food is critically dependent on all sensory attributes being right, and so food can, for instance, shock us simply by serving it at the wrong temperature, or if it has an inappropriate colour
    20. 20. Factors That Affect Food Perception• Sight: the visual attributes of the stimulus will likely evoke expectations• Taste: the tongue, palate, soft palate, and areas in the upper throat detect sensations• Smell: the receptors of the olfactory system detect molecules in the air• Chemesthisis: mediates information about irritants through nerve endings• Texture: Texture plays a major role in our recognition of foods• Temperature: we have expectations for the serving temperature for most foods and beverages• Hearing: this can set expectations, effect how we experience textures
    21. 21. Sight Sound Texture Temperature
    22. 22. Sensory Incongruity• The deliberate mismatching of the sensory attributes of a dish or food product• Sensory incongruity can elicit negative as well as positive responses• Sensory incongruity is more challenging
    23. 23. Sensory Incongruity• There is always a possibility that when the ‘moment of truth’ comes, and any one (or more) of the other sensory properties of the product do not match up to the expectations that have been created by one of the other senses• The likely reaction of a diner to such an experience depends on – The nature of the sensory incongruity involved – Whether the incongruity is hidden or visible – The situation or context in which the incongruity is experienced – The person who happens to be experiencing it
    24. 24. Adaption and Suppression• Adaptation: When subject to a constant stimulus, the senses become less responsive• Mixture Suppression: The phenomenon that individual taste and smell characteristics are perceived as less intense in mixtures than alone
    25. 25. Environment
    26. 26. Presentation and Display
    27. 27. A Little Research….What flavour would you expect these drinks to be?

    ×