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Achieving success with distributed teams
 

Achieving success with distributed teams

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A story of a distributed team that is achieving more success than most co-located.

A story of a distributed team that is achieving more success than most co-located.

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  • Getting the foundations is a great place to startBut the whole picture is something like jenga on an anvilFoundations are required. Some of the blocks can go missing, but I’m not sure which ones you can take and how many before it falls down.
  • Getting the foundations is a great place to startBut the whole picture is something like jenga on an anvilFoundations are required. Some of the blocks can go missing, but I’m not sure which ones you can take and how many before it falls down.

Achieving success with distributed teams Achieving success with distributed teams Presentation Transcript

  • ACHIEVING SUCCESS WITH DISTRIBUTED TEAMS Tonight’s Sponsor IMPROVING ENTERPRISES
  • -Jane Prusakova -Luid Hancock ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  • • • • • 4-5 years with Agile Scrum Master, BA, Coach, Programmer, Architect, PM Small to Large Enterprises Insurance, Financial, Internet Marketing JOSH WOODCOCK
  • Audience • • • • • • • Considering Tried it, didn’t work. Distributed = Dark Side Doing Awesome Agony What’s distributed?
  • Problem #1
  • Problem #1
  • Problem #1
  • Problem #1 Cost $$  Skill & Competitive 
  • Problem #1
  • Solution #1
  • Solution #1 Remote source skilled workers
  • Solution #1 
  • Problem #2
  • Problem #2
  • THE STORY
  • Same Place, Different Locations THE EPIPHANY
  • Team Member Locations
  • How we are doing? • Customer satisfaction is so high they are recommending us to other companies • Product direction changes weekly • CI server builds multiple times per day as code is checked in • Pair programming and backlog grooming occurs naturally throughout day • Employees are highly autonomous and require little to no management involvement • Most of collaboration is face to face or through screen sharing
  • How we are doing? • Working software demonstrated at least weekly to customers and users • Team members work 40-45 hrs / week • Technical enhancements are written in business terms and prioritized in product backlog • Releases to production provide new value every 1-2 weeks • Teams velocity is about the same for each team member • Team identifies opportunities and follows through on improvements weekly
  • Operational Foundations Project Tracking
  • Josh.Woodcock@ImprovingEnterprises.com (407) 235-4361 @BJoshWoodcock JOSH WOODCOCK
  • Operationally critical elements • Virtual team room – As long as you are working you have your web cam or screen share on • • • • 1 week iterations Use of video instead of face conversation Limited use of email Phones are only used when absolutely necessary. Facial expressions drastically improve communication. • Daily code integration, daily builds, and test driven development • Pair group programming and testing
  • Things that help a lot • Near same time zone to maintain common working hours • Team members desire to overcome personal challenges, and bring out the best in one another • Occasional meet up in same room. Establish relationships early in project if it’s a brand new team.
  • Things that help a lot • Communication is superfluous not back and forth. • Management resolves team level obstacles in 2 days or less • Forum or Wiki for team communication, meeting notes, living documents
  • Things that help a lot • Limit email within the team – Use voice or forum for discussions – Subscription-based email service to document updates – Google docs, Confluence Wiki, Sharepoint, GitHub
  • Continuous communication • As a general rule, every team members is available to others for ad-hoc discussions • Responses are given within minutes or seconds – Not hours or days
  • Learning Experiences • 5 days is great. 3 days is not enough. 4 days is minimum. • Turn around time on questions from PO must be less than 15 mins during day • Improving once a week from retrospectives due to short iterations drastically improves performance • Recurring scheduled collaboration sessions, like pairing, makes communication more superfluous since ad-hoc meetings are more difficult to schedule • An awesome distributed team will still do better than an average collocated team
  • Recommended Web-based tools • JIRA Agile, Rally, VesionOne, etc. • Google Hangouts, Lync, Skype 4.2 for continuous communication and collaboration • GoTo Meeting, WebEx for presentations • http://www.planningpoker.com/ works great for planning poker
  • Other Resources • http://confluex.com/blog/a-distributedteams-insurance/ • http://beagile.biz/agile-collaboration-tools/