Job Development 2007

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  • Josh

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  • 1. Employment and Job Development
  • 2. Presenters Joshua Skolnick - Director of Individual Service Initiatives and Community Based Programming Christopher McMullan - Community Transition Coordinator Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist Anita Prasad - Community Programming Specialist
  • 3. A Little About The Shield Institute and The Work Program
    • The Shield Institute
    • Operating in Manhattan, Queens, and the Bronx, and in business since 1921, The Shield Institute provides wide ranging services for children, teenagers and adults with developmental disabilities, and their families. We believe that every person has unique talents and abilities, which are valuable in the workplace. Our agency works to support each individual in realizing their employment potential and fulfilling their dreams to live and work with dignity.
  • 4.
    • Community Transition Services
    • The Shield Institute’s Community Transition Services focus on giving people with disabling conditions opportunities to become active and fully included members of their communities. We assist each person in exploring, and actualizing a plan, for their transition into the world of work. To this end we help individuals and their families to create a profile that reflects their likes, dislikes, strengths, fears and dreams. This information becomes the foundation from which they make life planning decisions. Key to this process is enabling individuals to regularly venture out into their local communities, where they can expand their vision for their future while increasing their vocational skills. These experiences are integral to their growth, independence and acceptance as a full fledged member of their community .
    A Little About The Shield Institute and The Work Program
  • 5. Why Are Vocational Programs So Important?
    • IDEA mandates that students have
      • the opportunity to go out into the community as part of their transition services
      • Seamless transition
  • 6. Did You Know.......
    • The average salary for a person with a disability, any disability - physical or cognitive, is less than $15,000 per year.
    • This statistic includes a select few multi-millionaires, and several other people, such as Christopher Reeve, who became disabled after making the majority of their money.
    • Research shows, the three main factors inhibiting people with disabilities from getting or maintaining a job after leaving school are:
      • lack of training before they leave school as to proper work etiquette, personal strengths, as well as an understanding of their own job requirements, etc.
      • lack of opportunity to experience a variety of different types of jobs in order to gauge interest
      • lack of support while on the job
  • 7. Did You Know.......
    • 80% of the individuals with disabilities that get the proper support and training while in school, and have support that follows them after leaving school, get and maintain jobs for a minimum of two years - post high school.
    • Without that support, that percentage drops to less than 30% for one year post school - even lower for two years.
    • As a point of comparison - the current unemployment rate for individuals without disabilities is still approximately 4% - its lowest level in years.
  • 8. The long term decisions, made by all of us, for our students who are transitioning out, will remain with them for: The Next Twenty Years!!!!! BEAR IN MIND
  • 9. The Benefit of Working
    • Money
    • Dignity, Self-respect
    • Respect from others
    • Social network from which to develop friendships and natural support
    • Places for social interaction
    • Feel productive
  • 10. What are the Components of Quality Job Development
    • Is always based on individual interests and preferences
      • task
      • environment
    • Is always based on individual strengths
    • Tasks being done are a necessary part of the successful operation of the place of business
      • NO CHARITY
    • Not everyone has to try everything or “I will not flip burgers and you can’t make me!”
    • Internal support systems
    • Administrative and staff support - this is a group effort
  • 11. Important:
    • No one is ever ready to begin working in the community. Skills are best learned in the environments in which they will be utilized, and, if necessary, reinforced separately. If we wait until people are ready , then……
  • 12. Quality Job Development is always based on individual interests and preferences in terms of task and environment
  • 13. Quality Job Development is always based on an individual’s strengths
  • 14. Tasks being done are a necessary part of the successful operation of the place of business Charity = Job Loss
  • 15.
    • Mean?
    What Does Person-Centered Planning
  • 16. Aims of Person Centered Planning
    • Describe a desirable future for the person
    • Delineate the activities and supports necessary to achieve the desired vision and develop a tangible weekly schedule
    • Mobilize existing resources to make the vision become a reality
  • 17. Five Basic Assumptions of Person-Centered Planning:
    • Person-Centered Planning processes are learned and used as a matter of course. The focus is on valuing a person’s unique gifts, abilities and contributions.
    • Community Building becomes an intentional action, part of the core work, at the personal, local and global community levels.
    • Self-Determination is honored and supported.
  • 18.
    • Flexible use of financial and other resources is managed to meet the needs of the individual. Existing resources are used creatively and with innovation. New resources are sought or created.
    • Organizational change, including the desire and willingness for change, is operant.
    Five Basic Assumptions of Person-Centered Planning:
  • 19. ® Beth Mount
  • 20. The Five Accomplishments Discover Capacity Growth in Relationships (belonging) Sharing Ordinary Places Building Community Contribution Choice Create Vision Developing Supports Sharing Resources Respect ® Connie Lyle O’Brien, John O’Brien
  • 21. Organizational change, including the desire and willingness for change, is operant.
  • 22. 5 Essential Questions
    • What is the person’s history and current life situation?
    • What are the strengths and gifts of the person?
    • What is the vision or dream for the person?
    • What are the team’s fears, obstacles, or challenges to building a better life for the person?
    • What are the priorities and goals for the future, and what will it take to make the vision happen?
  • 23. And a 6 th
    • Who and What do I have in my life to assist me in making this happen…
    • Moving my Dreams OFF the PAPER and into my everyday
  • 24. Person-Centered Planning processes are learned and used as a matter of course. The focus is on valuing a person’s unique gifts, abilities and contributions.
  • 25. The Importance of Language
  • 26. Who Would You Rather Spend Time With?
    • Affectionate
    • Nice
    • Wants to please
    • Works well one to one
    • Enjoys himself
    • Learns well through consistent routines
    • Drools often and plays with it, especially if with a new person
    • Poor toileting hygiene
    • Demands attention, even negative
    • Scratches if angry
  • 27. The Language of “Us” and “They”
    • We like things.
    • They fixate on objects.
    • We try to make friends.
    • They display attention-seeking behaviors.
    • We take a break.
    • They display off-task behaviors.
    • We stand up for ourselves.
    • They are noncompliant.
    • We have hobbies.
    • They self-stimulate.
    • We choose our friends wisely.
    • They display poor peer socialization.
  • 28. The Language of “We” and “They”
    • We persevere.
    • They perseverate.
    • We love people.
    • They have dependencies on people.
    • We go for a walk.
    • They run away.
    • We insist.
    • They tantrum.
    • We change our minds.
    • They are disoriented and have short attention spans.
    • We have talents.
    • They have splinter skills.
  • 29. It's In the Language!!
  • 30.
    • Obsessive
    • Hyperactive
    • ADD/Short Attention Span
    • Touches Others A Lot
    • Yells/Screamer
    • Ritualized
    Let’s Play The Language Game…… • Focused • Energetic • Multiple/Varied Interests • Affectionate • Demonstrative/Makes feelings known • Can follow a pattern
  • 31. Respect Map
    • SHE IS A REAL LADY!!
    • Affectionate
    • Compliant
    • Likes to please people
    • Organized
    • Elegant
    • Attentive to other
    • Can be focused
    • Clean, tidy
    • Well dressed
    • Perfectionist
    • Likes to be right/correct
    • Decisive with regard to wants
    • Eager
    • Strong willed
    • Humming • Self-Stimulatory Behavior • Day-dreams • Stares at people • Interrupts • Impulsive • Perfectionist • Hits when overly frustrated CHARACTERISTICS THAT ARE POSITIVE, LEAD TO ACCEPTANCE CHARACTERISTICS THAT ARE NEGATIVE, LEAD TO REJECTION
  • 32. Community Building becomes an intentional action, part of the core work, at the personal, local and global community levels.
  • 33. Components of Quality Communities
    • Tolerant/Respectful
    • Takes advantage of people’s strengths
    • Promotes/sustains new relationships
    • Everyone participates in activities
    • Everyone feels connected, has an important role
    • Everyone has a say in community decisions
  • 34. Components of Quality Inclusive Programs
    • Tolerant/Respectful
    • Takes advantage of people’s strengths
    • Promotes/sustains new relationships
    • Everyone participates in activities
    • Everyone feels connected, has an important role
    • Everyone has a say in classroom decisions
  • 35. COMMUNITY BUILDING INCLUSION =
  • 36. Who is ____________?
  • 37.  
  • 38. What works?
  • 39.  
  • 40. What are the hopes and dreams? A life of my own choosing…
  • 41. What are fears and nightmares? What makes me feel unsafe…
  • 42.  
  • 43. Who and What can Help?
  • 44.  
  • 45. Relationship Map Friends Family Paid Service Providers Community Members ME
  • 46.  
  • 47.  
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50.  
  • 51. Relationship Reality Friends Family Paid Service Providers Community Members People with developmental disabilities often have little or no friends. The more significant the disability the fewer real friends they usually have. People with developmental disabilities often have less direct family involvement than their non-disabled peers. The reality of life for a person with a developmental disability is that almost all major life decisions are made by paid service providers and not by them or their families. People with developmental disabilities have substantially little community involvement as compared to their non-disabled peers, and what they do have is much more controlled.
  • 52. Not everyone has to try everything or “I will not flip burgers and you can’t make me!”
  • 53. • Giving someone a choice is always intentional. • Choice must be respected • Making good choices comes from the opportunity to learn from bad ones • Choice processes can be taught, but choices can not.
  • 54.
    • Developing and Prioritizing of Short and Long Term Goals
    Finalizing the Vision
  • 55.  
  • 56.  
  • 57. Internal Support Systems
  • 58. The Culture of People with Autism
    • “ Autism is of course not truly a culture…however it affects the ways that individuals eat, dress, work, spend leisure time, understand their world, communicate.”
      • Gary Mesibov, TEACCH, UNC
  • 59. Structured Teaching (TEACCH)
    • Focus on child’s interests, strengths, and preferences
    • Understand how characteristics of autism affect the child’s world
    • Change the way we behave first- create supports in form of schedules, work systems, etc.
    • Supports a person’s growth from emerging skills towards independence
  • 60. Structured Teaching (TEACCH)
    • North Carolina, where the TEACCH model is used statewide, boasts the lowest parental stress rates of caregivers of people with autism, and the highest employment rates for individuals with autism.
  • 61. Forms
  • 62. Forms
  • 63. Forms
  • 64. Working with Potential Job Sites
    • Targeted Literature or Brochures
    • Be tenacious/thick skinned
    • Find out who has decision making power and work with them
      • If this person is not the store/site manager, gauge site interest before calling
    • Give the decision maker reasons to say “yes”
    • Anticipate questions that will be asked
      • who will support him/her, insurance/liability, schedule flexibility, what if things go wrong, etc.
    • Be creative especially in solving problems
    • Compromise whenever possible
  • 65. Literature How Local Businesses Are Helping Young People With Disabilities Learn to Work
  • 66. Shall We Visit Some Shield Students At Work?
  • 67.  
  • 68. Questions, Thoughts, Comments
  • 69. Critical Thinking
    • Think about your agency and the people you serve
    • Make a list of the things working in favor of your getting people into community based work sites, and those things working against you.
  • 70. Things working for us Things working against us
    • Staff commitment
    • Administrative support
    • Time within the daily schedule
     Staffing ratios - too many consumers with too few staff  Neighborhood resistance  Lack of available staff to develop job sites
  • 71. Critical Thinking: Developing A Plan for Work
    • Think about your agency and the people you serve
    • Pick one person to begin to develop a plan for community-based work. Make a list of interests, characteristics of a positive work environment, and things to avoid.
    • Use that list to develop a listing of possible places that, under ideal conditions, he/she would enjoy working.
    • List three to five action steps to be done in the next two months, and the person responsible to carry out step, in order to begin to actualize this plan.
  • 72. Contact Us
    • Joshua Skolnick: [email_address]
    • Christopher McMullan: [email_address]
    • Anita Prasad: [email_address]