OpenStreetMap Presentation to Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling: How OSM can help bicycling and SRTS
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OpenStreetMap Presentation to Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling: How OSM can help bicycling and SRTS

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This was a presentation I gave to Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling (FABB) at the Patrick Henry Library in Vienna, Virginia on August 17, 2011. I covered the basics of OpenStreetMap, what can......

This was a presentation I gave to Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling (FABB) at the Patrick Henry Library in Vienna, Virginia on August 17, 2011. I covered the basics of OpenStreetMap, what can be done with OSM, and specifically how it might help with the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program. If you'd like to find out more about the SRTS Mapping Toolkit, visit http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Safe_Routes_to_School_Mapping_Toolkit.

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  • 1. OpenStreetMap: Bicycling and SRTS Josh Doe <josh@joshdoe.com> Given to Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling   August 17, 2011
  • 2. Outline
      • What is OpenStreetMap (OSM)?
      • What can be done with OSM
      • OSM data model
      • How to map
      • Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Mapping Toolkit
  • 3. What is OpenStreetMap?
      • Community driven project to map the world
      • Anyone can contribute, like Wikipedia
        • History is kept: vandalism can be undone
      • Collaboratively determined mapping conventions
      • Data is freely available for anyone to use
  • 4. What can be done with OSM data?
      • Online maps
      • Mobile apps
      • Routing/navigation
      • Analysis
  • 5. OpenStreetMap.org
  • 6. Open.MapQuest.com
  • 7. Paper Maps
  • 8. Routing © 2011 CloudMade - Map data CCBYSA 2011 OpenStreetMap.org contributors
  • 9. Analysis Sidewalks and roads maintained by my subdivision
  • 10. Elevation Profile Web Service
  • 11. Ride the City.com
      • Uses own database of trails for routing, OSM for map
      • Planning switch to OSM for routing
        • Test server setup for Baltimore-Washington metro area
  • 12. OpenTripPlanner.com
      • Multi-modal trip planner (walking, biking, transit)
  • 13. Humanitarian Relief
      • Dedicated Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team
        • Humanitarian Response & Economic Development
      • Haiti, Sendai, Libya, and many others
      • Used by Fairfax County Urban Search & Rescue Team (VA-TF1) during Haiti response
    CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Erica 'junipermarie' http://flic.kr/p/7f9a9y Courtesy VA-TF1 member
  • 14. OSM Data Model
      • Three feature types:
        • Nodes (points, vertices)
        • Ways (edges, lines)
        • Relations
      • Areas as closed ways, or multipolygons with relations
      • Tags (attributes) open ended
        • Key-value system, string based
        • e.g. name=Patrick Henry Library,amenity=library
      •   Topological
        • Ways connect with common node
      • Features have unique internal id + version number
  • 15. On-the-ground Surveying
    • Photo CC-BY-SA Gordon Joly http://flic.kr/p/4KPZ8B
  • 16. Walking Papers.org
      • Print, survey & annotate, scan, edit
  • 17. Aerial Imagery VBMP 2007 (6-inch)
      • Microsoft Bing imagery (global), federal/state/local imagery
  • 18. Potlatch2 - online editor
  • 19. JOSM - Java editor
  • 20.
      • MapDust - error reporting
        • Embed on any website
      • JOSM validator
        • Checks before uploading
      • OSM Watch List
        • Reports of changes in an area
      • KeepRight
        • Automatic error detection
      • Many other specialized tools
    Quality Assurance
  • 21. Safe Routes to School
      • US federal program to:
        • Promote walking and biking to school
        • Provide funding for improvement of infrastructure
      • Maps are a critical component of SRTS application
      • No standard method to produce maps
  • 22. Safe Routes to School Mapping Toolkit
      • Just a concept!
      • Automatic creation of maps for SRTS applications
        • No GIS skills needed
        • Near-professional quality, standardized maps
      • OSM-based
        • Community can map infrastructure
        • Benefits other data users (routing, printed maps, etc.)
        • Toolkit can be used across the country
      • Map types
        • Current and planned infrastructure
        • Walkability analysis (distance maps)
          • % improvement in access
      • http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Safe_Routes_to_School_Mapping_Toolkit
  • 23. Walkability Example
      • Terra Centre Elementary School
        • New sidewalk being built
        • Already mapped trails and sidewalks
        • Determine walkability before and after construction
      • Assumptions:
        • 1 mile walking distance (show 1/4 mile increments)
        • Unsafe to walk along secondary roads and above
        • Unsafe to cross secondary and above without crossing
      •   Could add more criteria
        • Elevation, curb cuts (wheelchair accessibility)
  • 24. Walkability before new sidewalk Attendance boundary in green
  • 25. Walkability after new sidewalk Attendance boundary in green
  • 26. Notes
      • This presentation is licensed CC-BY-SA
      • Some slides CC-BY-SA Harry Wood http://goo.gl/iHYN9
    •  
      • Some links:
      • http://www.openstreetmap.org
      • http://www.open.mapquest.com
      • http://open.mapquest.com/
      • http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Safe_Routes_to_School_Mapping_Toolkit
      • &quot;OpenStreetMap: Data Model, Crowdsourcing, and Technology&quot;, http://www.applied-geoinformatics.org/index.php/agse/agse2010/paper/view/181/115