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Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?
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Highwire presentation: What's a publisher to do?

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  • 1. What’s a Publisher to Do? Coping with Open Access Joseph J. Esposito Portable CEO Highwire Press Presentation espositoj@gmail.com April 21, 2005
  • 2. Topics • Defining Open Access • What is a legacy publication? • What is beyond the scope of this talk? • Defining and defending one’s interests • The “rings” of journal subscriptions • Moving to the inner rings • OA: Friend or foe? • Leakage • After legacy publications, what?
  • 3. Core— Never Cancelled Already Cancelled Unlikely to be cancelled Vulnerable journals; cancellation possible How vulnerable is your journal?
  • 4. What is Open Access? • Various definitions and conventions (Budapest, Bethesda, etc.) • Potentially covers all intellectual property • For our purposes, we are discussing only research journals • Lowest-common-denominator OA: accessible by anyone with a Web browser
  • 5. Legacy Publication • Already exists; not a new publication • Some revenue derived from subscriptions • Medium is irrelevant (print or electronic) • Conforms to scholarly conventions (e.g., prepublication peer review) • Profits or surplus (if any) distributed to shareholders or used for other activities • Universe: about 24,000
  • 6. Not on the Table Today . . . • The future of scholarly communications • The ideal way research should be conducted and disseminated • New business models • New businesses • Responsibilities of the scholarly community • Instead, let’s talk about your interests as a journal publisher
  • 7. One Community, Many Interests • Librarians seek comprehensive collections • Librarians seek lower prices • Scholars seek to publish and to read • Administrators seek metrics to guide in tenure decisions • Publishers seek markets and a competitive return on capital • None of these is a “wrong” interest
  • 8. Why Do Librarians Cancel Subscriptions? • Poor quality of journal • Shifting academic requirements • Limited budget (price increases, university cutbacks, allocations for new products and projects) • Availability of material from other sources • Resistance to business practices • Etc.
  • 9. Core— Never Cancelled Already Cancelled Unlikely to be cancelled Vulnerable journals; cancellation possible How vulnerable is your journal?
  • 10. Strategy: Get to the Center • Superior editorial program • Superior business practices • Exclusivity of content
  • 11. What Makes Content Not Exclusive? • Availability through aggregators • Liberal interlibrary loan policies • Liberal single-document availability • Open Access (lowest-common- denominator variety) • OA is just one of several ways that exclusivity is undermined
  • 12. Leakage • The “escape” of copyrighted material from sealed containers • Sometimes legitimate, mostly not • Various means (preprint servers, institutional repositories, mandated archives, simple email attachments) • Leakage is inevitable • DRM mostly not effective
  • 13. Tactics • Avoid confrontations over OA • Slow down the slide toward OA without alienating customers and readers • Run legacy journals as mature businesses (maximize cash, reduce marketing) • Extend the life as long as possible, generating as much cash as you can • Use the cash to invest in new products, not in the legacy journals
  • 14. What Does the Future Look Like? • All journals are mature • Some will be run for cash (the right way) • Some publishers will invest in legacy journals (siphoning off capital) • Use cash to start innovative products (innovate by form, not by content)—e.g., heirs to arXiv • A multiplicity of forms will evolve
  • 15. Core— Never Cancelled Already Cancelled Unlikely to be cancelled Vulnerable journals; cancellation possible How vulnerable is your journal?

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