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Theories

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  • 1. Theories
    Jordan Cruickshank
  • 2. Copycat theory
    Copycat effect refers to the tendency of sensational publicity about violent murders or suicides to result in more of the same through imitation.
    It has been shown that people mimic crimes seen in the media, especially in the news or violent movies. These people tend to have poor mental health or psychological problems. Suggests effect of the media is indirect (more affecting criminal behaviour) rather than direct (directly affecting the number of criminals).
    The game ‘Manhunt’ was banned in 2004 as it was perceived to be too violent, this was due to one consumer imitating the actions in the game he was playing and resulting in murdering his friend.
  • 3. Desensitisation theory
    Desensitisation theory is the assumption that repeated exposure to violence in media, such as video games, makes younger viewers more accepting of violence and more likely to commit violence in reality.
    Theory argues that because people are exposed to so much violence in the media, violence no longer makes a strong emotional impact upon them. Most people would agree that by watching lots of violent movies, a viewer no longer gets upset while watching violent movies.
  • 4. Cultivation theory
    Cultivation theory is a social theory which examined the long-term effects of television on American audiences of all ages.
    Gerbner and Stephen Mirirai1976, overall concern about the effects of television on audiences stemmed from the unprecedented centrality of television in American culture. There was also concern that programming (especially violent programmes) was effecting attitudes and behaviours of American people. They compared the power of television to the power of religion, saying that television was to modern society what religion once was in earlier times.