The Social Web for Business

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Not sure why social media is so important to business? Looking for some practical advice on how to develop your own SM strategy? Hopefully, this guide takes you through everything you need to know to get started,

A slideshare-friendly and updated version of the presentation I gave at the Sydney Knowledge Management Roundtable (#KMRT) on August 26th, 09.

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  • Twitter has seen astronomical growth since launch two years ago. Yet it has seen that growth overtake all expectations in the first part of 2009 as mainstream media has cottoned on to the potential. With more awareness comes more users. Whether this huge upward trend continues or whether it fades over time, there is no doubt that right now, Twitter is where hundreds of thousands of people want to be. And therefore now is when businesses should tap into that stream.
  • For most people, social media looks like this. YouTube, facebook, Twitter etc.
  • For most people, social media looks like this. YouTube, facebook, Twitter etc.
  • I would suggest that social media is the entire internet. Sending an email is a social activity of communication. Building a website intended for others to read and interact with is a social activity. Surfing Google is a social activity as the results have been refined and influenced by other users to increase relevance.
  • The audience is now as powerful as the media. A guy in his bedroom can now create a broadcasting empire with a blog, a video camera a laptop and a phone. Used well, he can reach hundreds of thousands of people with his message – something that previously was only possible for big business with large budgets. This shift is the reason why businesses cannot ignore social media. It is already happening, whether you choose to be a part of it or not.
  • But your employees are also connected. Some businesses restrict certain websites in their offices, blocking access. When everyone else is talking about your business, why would you handicap your own troops? Sure, I don’t mean to suggest your employees should be playing and watching funny YouTube videos all day. But, if you implement clear guidelines of acceptable usage and train your staff how to interact professionally in a way that represents the brand, your staff become a powerful engaging resource.
  • So what are your target audience doing in Twitter and why should you even care? The reality is that Twitter – like a lot of social media – is where potential customers spread word of mouth. The customer decision process doesn’t happen on your website and increasingly may begin even before a person goes to Google. People ask other people for recommendations. What laptop should I get for my son? But before you start thinking that it is more relevant to tech products than anything else, let’s look what else people are discussing. My dad has given me money to buy a winter wardrobe. Where should I spend it? So there is an opportunity for clothing recommendations. A link recommending a jewellery supplier – not only a recommendation but a direct, impartial and spin-free link. Now that is gold to that business – pardon the pun. But – more importantly, what can be positive can also be negative. Avoid the café in the Lovett Tower in Woden, Canberra. Their coffee is – well, you can see for yourself. We know the old marketing saying that if someone likes your business they’ll tell 3 people. If they have something to complain about, they’ll tell 7. This is extremely true on Twitter – but multiply that by a factor of thousands.
  • So what are your target audience doing in Twitter and why should you even care? The reality is that Twitter – like a lot of social media – is where potential customers spread word of mouth. The customer decision process doesn’t happen on your website and increasingly may begin even before a person goes to Google. People ask other people for recommendations. What laptop should I get for my son? But before you start thinking that it is more relevant to tech products than anything else, let’s look what else people are discussing. My dad has given me money to buy a winter wardrobe. Where should I spend it? So there is an opportunity for clothing recommendations. A link recommending a jewellery supplier – not only a recommendation but a direct, impartial and spin-free link. Now that is gold to that business – pardon the pun. But – more importantly, what can be positive can also be negative. Avoid the café in the Lovett Tower in Woden, Canberra. Their coffee is – well, you can see for yourself. We know the old marketing saying that if someone likes your business they’ll tell 3 people. If they have something to complain about, they’ll tell 7. This is extremely true on Twitter – but multiply that by a factor of thousands.
  • So what are your target audience doing in Twitter and why should you even care? The reality is that Twitter – like a lot of social media – is where potential customers spread word of mouth. The customer decision process doesn’t happen on your website and increasingly may begin even before a person goes to Google. People ask other people for recommendations. What laptop should I get for my son? But before you start thinking that it is more relevant to tech products than anything else, let’s look what else people are discussing. My dad has given me money to buy a winter wardrobe. Where should I spend it? So there is an opportunity for clothing recommendations. A link recommending a jewellery supplier – not only a recommendation but a direct, impartial and spin-free link. Now that is gold to that business – pardon the pun. But – more importantly, what can be positive can also be negative. Avoid the café in the Lovett Tower in Woden, Canberra. Their coffee is – well, you can see for yourself. We know the old marketing saying that if someone likes your business they’ll tell 3 people. If they have something to complain about, they’ll tell 7. This is extremely true on Twitter – but multiply that by a factor of thousands.
  • So what are your target audience doing in Twitter and why should you even care? The reality is that Twitter – like a lot of social media – is where potential customers spread word of mouth. The customer decision process doesn’t happen on your website and increasingly may begin even before a person goes to Google. People ask other people for recommendations. What laptop should I get for my son? But before you start thinking that it is more relevant to tech products than anything else, let’s look what else people are discussing. My dad has given me money to buy a winter wardrobe. Where should I spend it? So there is an opportunity for clothing recommendations. A link recommending a jewellery supplier – not only a recommendation but a direct, impartial and spin-free link. Now that is gold to that business – pardon the pun. But – more importantly, what can be positive can also be negative. Avoid the café in the Lovett Tower in Woden, Canberra. Their coffee is – well, you can see for yourself. We know the old marketing saying that if someone likes your business they’ll tell 3 people. If they have something to complain about, they’ll tell 7. This is extremely true on Twitter – but multiply that by a factor of thousands.
  • So what are your target audience doing in Twitter and why should you even care? The reality is that Twitter – like a lot of social media – is where potential customers spread word of mouth. The customer decision process doesn’t happen on your website and increasingly may begin even before a person goes to Google. People ask other people for recommendations. What laptop should I get for my son? But before you start thinking that it is more relevant to tech products than anything else, let’s look what else people are discussing. My dad has given me money to buy a winter wardrobe. Where should I spend it? So there is an opportunity for clothing recommendations. A link recommending a jewellery supplier – not only a recommendation but a direct, impartial and spin-free link. Now that is gold to that business – pardon the pun. But – more importantly, what can be positive can also be negative. Avoid the café in the Lovett Tower in Woden, Canberra. Their coffee is – well, you can see for yourself. We know the old marketing saying that if someone likes your business they’ll tell 3 people. If they have something to complain about, they’ll tell 7. This is extremely true on Twitter – but multiply that by a factor of thousands.
  • Should you care that Trib doesn’t like the coffee? Can one person’s whinge really make a difference? Well, Trib is followed by over 4,000 people – far more than the 7 people we would normally assume. Trib is a popular and highly influential Twitter user – something he says has a genuine impact. But whether a person has 4000 or 400 followers, the knock on effect is huge. One of those followers can retweet the original tweet, taking it to a further audience. That can be retweeted again. And again. Some messages have been retweeted a number of times, reaching potentially hundreds of thousands of people. Don’t you want that message to be positive? If there are negative messages out there, wouldn’t you want to respond and turn that perception around?
  • The multitude of books is a great evil. There is no limit to this fever for writing; every one must be an author; some out of vanity, to acquire celebrity and raise up a name, others for the sake of mere gain. *Martin Luther – Table Talk (1530s)
  • Television won't last because people will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night. *Daryl Zanuck – Twentieth Century Fox (1946)
  • Television won't last because people will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night. *Daryl Zanuck – Twentieth Century Fox (1946)
  • The multitude of books is a great evil. There is no limit to this fever for writing; every one must be an author; some out of vanity, to acquire celebrity and raise up a name, others for the sake of mere gain. *Martin Luther – Table Talk (1530s)
  • The multitude of books is a great evil. There is no limit to this fever for writing; every one must be an author; some out of vanity, to acquire celebrity and raise up a name, others for the sake of mere gain. *Martin Luther – Table Talk (1530s)
  • When I was a boy, there was a corner shop near our house. Mr and Mrs Roberts had run that shop for decades. They knew my name. They knew the names of all the kids and all the families that came in the shop. They knew when it was my pocket money day when I walked in with my 35 pence to spend on penny chews and comics. My family moved away to Australia when I was seven. Years later, I returned to that street and of course the shop was gone. The local shops had changed, replaced by supermarkets and major retailers. But, nearly thirty five years later, I still remember their names. I still remember watching them slice the cheese for my mum and the layout of the sweets display. I still remember how they treated everyone who entered the shop.
  • When I was a boy, there was a corner shop near our house. Mr and Mrs Roberts had run that shop for decades. They knew my name. They knew the names of all the kids and all the families that came in the shop. They knew when it was my pocket money day when I walked in with my 35 pence to spend on penny chews and comics. My family moved away to Australia when I was seven. Years later, I returned to that street and of course the shop was gone. The local shops had changed, replaced by supermarkets and major retailers. But, nearly thirty five years later, I still remember their names. I still remember watching them slice the cheese for my mum and the layout of the sweets display. I still remember how they treated everyone who entered the shop.
  • When I was a boy, there was a corner shop near our house. Mr and Mrs Roberts had run that shop for decades. They knew my name. They knew the names of all the kids and all the families that came in the shop. They knew when it was my pocket money day when I walked in with my 35 pence to spend on penny chews and comics. My family moved away to Australia when I was seven. Years later, I returned to that street and of course the shop was gone. The local shops had changed, replaced by supermarkets and major retailers. But, nearly thirty five years later, I still remember their names. I still remember watching them slice the cheese for my mum and the layout of the sweets display. I still remember how they treated everyone who entered the shop.
  • The mass market changed everything. Technology, industrialisation and the ability to mass market a message through new media like television and radio allowed businesses to scale up their operations to immense proportions. But one thing they could never scale up was the relationship – the engagement. A television commercial doesn’t know your name. A supermarket of checkouts and shelf stackers is too busy to chat – reducing the customer conversation to ‘next, please’, ‘do you want fries with that’ and ‘do you have a fly buys card?’
  • The mass market changed everything. Technology, industrialisation and the ability to mass market a message through new media like television and radio allowed businesses to scale up their operations to immense proportions. But one thing they could never scale up was the relationship – the engagement. A television commercial doesn’t know your name. A supermarket of checkouts and shelf stackers is too busy to chat – reducing the customer conversation to ‘next, please’, ‘do you want fries with that’ and ‘do you have a fly buys card?’
  • Finally, technology gives us the ability to scale up those customer relationships. Finally, it is possible for businesses large and small to have those conversations on a scale that makes business sense. Finally, we are able to put the individual customer back at the centre of commerce again – where they were for thousands of years before we forgot about them in the pursuit of the mass market.
  • A true relationship means listening and responding, not just broadcasting.
  • A true relationship means listening and responding, not just broadcasting.
  • A true relationship means listening and responding, not just broadcasting.
  • A true relationship means listening and responding, not just broadcasting.
  • A true relationship means listening and responding, not just broadcasting.
  • The Social Web for Business

    1. 1. The Social Web for Business The Social Web for Business Jonathan Crossfield 26th August 2009
    2. 2. Why should my business care? The Social Web for Business WHY
    3. 3. Social networks are popular <ul><li>Over 70% of Australian internet users visited a social networking site in June 2009* </li></ul>*comScore study, June 2009 Reported in Marketing Charts, August 17th 2009
    4. 4. People want to be part of something exciting <ul><li>Twitter rose to over 800,000 users in June 2009, up from 13,000 in 2008* </li></ul>*comScore study, June 2009 Reported in Marketing Charts, August 17th 2009
    5. 5. Twitter is seeing astronomical growth The Social Web for Business *courtesy Hitwise Australia, July 2009 (Hitwise.com.au)
    6. 6. But businesses keep asking the wrong question How can my business use Twitter (or Facebook, etc)? The Social Web for Business
    7. 7. There is a better question The Social Web for Business How can I use the social web to help consumers achieve their goals?
    8. 8. Deciding to use a tool is a TACTIC I want to use a snow shovel to benefit my business http:// www.flickr.com /photos/signifying/ / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    9. 9. Helping people achieve goals is a STRATEGY Clearing my driveway helps more customers get where they’re going http:// www.flickr.com /photos/signifying/ / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    10. 10. Knowing the customer goal may reveal a better tool http:// www.flickr.com /photos/signifying/ / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Wow! Cleanest driveway in the street!
    11. 11. Human behaviour is the key!
    12. 12. The ANT Approach The Social Web for Business A N T nthropology ot echnology
    13. 13. ANT businesses are taking over
    14. 14. Google – designed for users, not businesses
    15. 15. Twitter – tapped into social behaviour
    16. 16. Amazon – made buying books easier
    17. 17. So, what is the social web? The Social Web for Business WHAT
    18. 18. You might think social media is this The Social Web for Business
    19. 19. These are just tools – snow shovels The Social Web for Business
    20. 20. The entire web is social – with many tools The Social Web for Business
    21. 21. Sending an email is a social activity…
    22. 22. Commenting on a blog is a social activity…
    23. 23. Interacting with a website is a social activity…
    24. 24. … and everyone has access to the toolshed!
    25. 25. The audience is now the media The Social Web for Business
    26. 26. But so are your employees! Use them! The Social Web for Business
    27. 27. Let’s look at just one tool
    28. 28. What is Twitter? <ul><li>A “microblogging” platform </li></ul><ul><li>Allows people to create posts (“tweets”) of 140 characters or less </li></ul><ul><li>Users can “follow” others that interest them </li></ul>The Social Web for Business
    29. 29. Originally designed as a “broadcast” medium The Social Web for Business
    30. 30. Evolved into an “engagement” medium The Social Web for Business
    31. 31. The users transformed Twitter The Social Web for Business
    32. 32. Users started replying to each other with @ The Social Web for Business
    33. 33. So Twitter built it in ! The Social Web for Business
    34. 34. User started using # to tag conversations The Social Web for Business
    35. 35. # made conversations searchable & real-time The Social Web for Business
    36. 36. So Twitter built it in! The Social Web for Business
    37. 37. Users began “retweets”, spreading content The Social Web for Business
    38. 38. So Twitter is building it in! The Social Web for Business
    39. 39. Word of mouth on Twitter The Social Web for Business
    40. 40. Will someone recommend your product? The Social Web for Business
    41. 41. Will someone recommend your shop? The Social Web for Business
    42. 42. Wow! Now this is word of mouth! The Social Web for Business
    43. 43. But then, so is this! The Social Web for Business
    44. 44. Should we care what they say? <ul><li>Trib is followed by 4000+ people. I’d care! </li></ul>The Social Web for Business
    45. 45. So what do the sceptics say?
    46. 46. “ Churn on Twitter is too high”
    47. 47. Why Twitter churn is not bad <ul><li>Joining Twitter is like signing up for flying lessons only to find yourself sitting at the controls of a passenger jet… but I envy you that moment when it 'clicks' and you suddenly realise the possibilities. </li></ul>The Social Web for Business *Graham Linehan – “The Conversation” Blog post 19th August 2009
    48. 48. “ Twitter tweets are pointless babble”
    49. 49. The Pear Analytics Report <ul><li>40% of tweets are “pointless babble” </li></ul><ul><li>37.55% were “conversational” </li></ul><ul><li>Suggested only 8.78% of tweets had “value” </li></ul>
    50. 50. The Pear Analytics Report We've heard it all before!
    51. 51. We’ve heard it all before! <ul><li>The problem with television is that the people must sit and keep their eyes glued on a screen; the average American family hasn't time for it. </li></ul>The Social Web for Business *The New York Times (1939)
    52. 52. We’ve heard it all before! <ul><li>This 'telephone' has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us. </li></ul>The Social Web for Business *Western Union internal memo (1876)
    53. 53. We’ve heard it all before! <ul><li>The multitude of books is a great evil. There is no limit to this fever for writing; every one must be an author; some out of vanity, to acquire celebrity and raise up a name, others for the sake of mere </li></ul><ul><li>gain. </li></ul>The Social Web for Business *Martin Luther – Table Talk (1530s)
    54. 54. Don’t listen to the sceptics! <ul><li>With the advent of every new medium — books, radio, TV, social networks — there is a built-in fear, social concern, that it will lead to lack of productivity and a general sense of dysfunction. This is one of the tropes of the arrival of any new media. Many consider Twitter a fad. </li></ul>The Social Web for Business *Joseph Turow - University of Pennsylvania USA Today August 25th 2009
    55. 55. “ Twitter tantrums should be ignored” The Social Web for Business
    56. 56. “ There’s no financial sense in social media” The Social Web for Business
    57. 57. Case Study The Social Web for Business Let's look at a real case study
    58. 58. A major Australian clothing retailer…
    59. 59. … released some controversial babywear. The Social Web for Business
    60. 60. A mother’s complaint was ignored! The Social Web for Business
    61. 61. The complaint was blogged The Social Web for Business
    62. 62. Twitter discussed the blog post – a lot The Social Web for Business
    63. 63. Cotton On’s Twitter page ignored them The Social Web for Business
    64. 64. More bloggers heard and reacted The Social Web for Business
    65. 65. Mainstream news heard the outcry The Social Web for Business
    66. 66. The Twitter call for a boycott was reported The Social Web for Business
    67. 67. Cotton On bowed to pressure The Social Web for Business
    68. 68. One complaint became thousands The Social Web for Business
    69. 69. Ignoring the social web cost money! The Social Web for Business
    70. 70. Who’s the big fish now? The Social Web for Business
    71. 71. But it’s not all bad news!
    72. 72. How should we use the social web? The Social Web for Business HOW
    73. 73. By providing “elegant organisation” <ul><li>You don’t start communities. They already exist. They’re already doing what they want to do. The question you should ask is how you can help them do that better. Bring them “elegant organisation”. </li></ul>The Social Web for Business Mark Zuckerberg – Creator of Facebook Quoted by Jeff Jarvis – “What Would Google Do?”
    74. 74. Identify the customer goal or problem The Social Web for Business
    75. 75. Understand the route they prefer to take The Social Web for Business http:// www.flickr.com/photos/tyskis / / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
    76. 76. Use the right tools to make it easier for them! The Social Web for Business http:// www.flickr.com/photos/jkransen / / CC BY-SA 2.0
    77. 77. See how many customers choose your route! The Social Web for Business http:// www.flickr.com/photos/grahamking / / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    78. 78. Direct sales via links & promotions
    79. 79. Brand awareness / customer engagement
    80. 80. Feedback & complaints management
    81. 81. Customer service & support
    82. 82. Solving problems with the Twitter API <ul><li>Application Programming Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Software designed to work with Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>Over 2000 applications currently developed </li></ul>The Social Web for Business
    83. 83. Filesocial.com – file sharing via Twitter The Social Web for Business
    84. 84. CommuterFeed.com - users tweet traffic info The Social Web for Business
    85. 85. Twitpay – sending money via Twitter The Social Web for Business
    86. 86. Twitition – create and sign petitions The Social Web for Business
    87. 87. Botanicalls - tweets when plants are thirsty The Social Web for Business
    88. 88. Ryan Rose modified a washing machine The Social Web for Business
    89. 89. Lets him know when washing is done! The Social Web for Business
    90. 90. What could you do? <ul><li>How could your business provide “elegant organisation” for your customers and staff with Twitter and the API? </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget the iPhone! </li></ul>
    91. 91. Twitter is not alone <ul><li>Find and recruit staff </li></ul><ul><li>Create employee groups and pool ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Create a company profile and network with related professionals </li></ul>
    92. 92. Twitter is not alone <ul><li>Tutorial ‘how to’ videos </li></ul><ul><li>Present a fun side to the business </li></ul><ul><li>Branding messages </li></ul>
    93. 93. Twitter is not alone <ul><li>Create communities for feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Share content and information to interested members </li></ul><ul><li>Spreading the brand ‘virally’ with facebook apps </li></ul>
    94. 94. Twitter is not alone <ul><li>Create an internal wiki </li></ul><ul><li>Allow employees to collate and collaborate </li></ul><ul><li>Share best practice and knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Empower staff and value their experience </li></ul>
    95. 95. But where’s the ROI? The Social Web for Business PROVE IT!
    96. 96. Dell <ul><li>Joined Twitter in 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Has achieved over US$3 million in sales from Twitter followers </li></ul><ul><li>Sales increasing – US$1 million in the last 6 months </li></ul>The Social Web for Business
    97. 97. Dell <ul><li>Multiple accounts </li></ul><ul><li>Offer special deals with links </li></ul><ul><li>Tracks conversions with proprietary software </li></ul>The Social Web for Business
    98. 98. Starbucks – MyStarbucksIdea.com The Social Web for Business <ul><li>Responds to the community </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews and promotes ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Customers submit and vote on suggestions </li></ul><ul><li>ALL Starbucks departments involved </li></ul>
    99. 99. Starbucks – MyStarbucksIdea.com The Social Web for Business
    100. 100. Starbucks – MyStarbucksIdea.com The Social Web for Business <ul><li>3 million unique visitors </li></ul><ul><li>60,000 ideas submitted </li></ul><ul><li>100,000s of comments </li></ul><ul><li>460,000 votes </li></ul><ul><li>Over 50 business changes made as a result </li></ul>
    101. 101. Engagement to revenue – is there a trend? *Source: Engagement db.com July 2009 Prepared by Wetpaint and Altimeter The Social Web for Business <ul><li>The top 100 global brands & the social web </li></ul>
    102. 102. Show me the money! The Social Web for Business Wallflowers (low – or no - engagement in 6 or less channels) Selectives (high engagement in 6 or fewer channels) Butterflies (low engagement in 7 or more channels Mavens (high engagement in 7 or more channels) *Source: Engagement db.com July 2009 Prepared by Wetpaint and Altimeter
    103. 103. What does it mean? The Social Web for Business <ul><li>Very hard to show definite cause and effect </li></ul><ul><li>However, the trend is very strong </li></ul><ul><li>Businesses engaging heavily in the social web have stronger growth </li></ul>
    104. 104. Nearly there… The Social Web for Business CONCLUSION
    105. 105. I grew up near a corner shop (not this one)
    106. 106. They knew me, my family, our story…
    107. 107. … and we knew them
    108. 108. It’s gone now. But 30 years on I still remember them
    109. 109. Corner shops gave way to supermarkets
    110. 110. We scaled up production http:// www.flickr.com/photos/inju / / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    111. 111. We scaled up marketing
    112. 112. We scaled up sales http:// www.flickr.com/photos/mr_beaver / / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    113. 113. We couldn’t scale up relationships “ Do you want fries with that?”
    114. 114. The social web scales up relationships!
    115. 115. What does this mean?
    116. 116. Listen and respond – don’t just broadcast
    117. 117. View everything from the customer’s position http:// www.flickr.com/photos/quaelin / / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
    118. 118. Treat everyone as individuals, not a mass market
    119. 119. Be an ANT! <ul><li>Care about Anthropology , N ot Technology ! </li></ul>
    120. 120. Thankyou @Netregistry @Kimota

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