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  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • In “Crime Reduction” students act as a consultant to incumbent Mayor Pat Stone who is running for reelection. Mayor Stone’s opponent is Dr. Jamie Eager, a member of the City Council who contests that Mayor Stone’s proposal for reducing crime by increasing the number of police officers is a bad idea. Rather, Dr. Eager believes that the city should take the money that would have gone to hiring more police officers to replicate a drug-treatment program that has found success in another town. As Mayor Stone’s consultant, students are asked to weigh evidence to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these two potential policy initiatives. In doing this task, students access various documents: A memo (as we see here) from a private investigator who looked at whether Dr. Eager had any connections with the existing drug treatment program.
  • Last year we introduced CLA in the Classroom, an initiative the focuses on issues of teaching and learning, drawing on principles from the literature on authentic assessment, performance tasks and rubrics. This program complements general assessment by looking to the course-level work of faculty and includes a set of curricular and pedagogical programs that focus on key higher order skills.
  • Having shown you examples of the instrument itself, let me turn now to the concept of student achievement as measured by the CLA. The CLA at its foundation has a learning orientation. What we mean by this is that we are focusing on the gains made by students while at an institution, -- while also controlling for the differences in abilities the students bring with them when they set foot on campus. By metaphor, imagine that you had two students learning how to play the piano, where one already plays the guitar and knows how to read sheet music, and the other has no musical background whatsoever. Given this information, we would expect our guitar player to perform better and an assessment that exhibits this doesn ’ t really tell us anything new. In a similar manner, we would not be surprised to find that students at a prestigious, nationally recognized, University performed better than students at a local community college. However, in controlling for incoming ability, we can look at the learning gains made by students (and by extension, their institutions) on the same plane. There are several ways we might conceptualize measuring growth.
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Some tasks are appropriate for general education courses, while others include specific disciplinary content.
  • Having shown you examples of the instrument itself, let me turn now to the concept of student achievement as measured by the CLA. The CLA at its foundation has a learning orientation. What we mean by this is that we are focusing on the gains made by students while at an institution, -- while also controlling for the differences in abilities the students bring with them when they set foot on campus. By metaphor, imagine that you had two students learning how to play the piano, where one already plays the guitar and knows how to read sheet music, and the other has no musical background whatsoever. Given this information, we would expect our guitar player to perform better and an assessment that exhibits this doesn ’ t really tell us anything new. In a similar manner, we would not be surprised to find that students at a prestigious, nationally recognized, University performed better than students at a local community college. However, in controlling for incoming ability, we can look at the learning gains made by students (and by extension, their institutions) on the same plane. There are several ways we might conceptualize measuring growth.
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Let’s start with the premise that “CLA institutions are equipped to improve higher order skills when they connect teaching, learning and assessment through authentic performance-based practices.”
  • Transcript

    • 1. An Excellent Outcomes Measurement Chris Jackson, CWRA Jonathan Martin, St. Gregory College Prep Kevin Mattingly, The Lawrenceville School
    • 2.
      • 2181 miles
    • 3.
      • 2181 miles
      Length of the Appalachian Trail
    • 4.  
    • 5.  
    • 6.  
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9.  
    • 10. These pages and the blogosphere have been abuzz about Academically Adrift, a new book that shows learning among college students is alarmingly limited. Numerous parties should be troubled by these findings, if for no other reason than the data question the impact of the teacher on the student, and the role of the administrator in ensuring that learning is taking place. In full disclosure, I have not yet read the book, and look forward to doing so, even if the sobering findings make me challenge what I do and how .
    • 11. These pages and the blogosphere have been abuzz about Academically Adrift, a new book that shows learning among college students is alarmingly limited. Numerous parties should be troubled by these findings, if for no other reason than the data question the impact of the teacher on the student, and the role of the administrator in ensuring that learning is taking place. In full disclosure, I have not yet read the book, and look forward to doing so, even if the sobering findings make me challenge what I do and how .
    • 12. These pages and the blogosphere have been abuzz about Academically Adrift, a new book that shows learning among college students is alarmingly limited. Numerous parties should be troubled by these findings, if for no other reason than the data question the impact of the teacher on the student, and the role of the administrator in ensuring that learning is taking place. In full disclosure, I have not yet read the book, and look forward to doing so, even if the sobering findings make me challenge what I do and how .
    • 13. These pages and the blogosphere have been abuzz about Academically Adrift, a new book that shows learning among college students is alarmingly limited. Numerous parties should be troubled by these findings, if for no other reason than the data question the impact of the teacher on the student, and the role of the administrator in ensuring that learning is taking place. In full disclosure, I have not yet read the book, and look forward to doing so, even if the sobering findings make me challenge what I do and how . Inside Higher Ed(!)
    • 14.
      • INSTITUTIONS ARE EQUIPPED TO IMPROVE HIGHER-ORDER SKILLS WHEN THEY CONNECT TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT THROUGH AUTHENTIC PERFORMANCE-BASED PRACTICES.
    • 15.
      • EQUIPPING:
      • Assessment
      • Formative Feedback
      • Faculty Development
    • 16. ASSESSMENT
    • 17.  
    • 18.
      • Critical thinking
      • Analytic reasoning
      • Problem solving
      • Written communication
    • 19. Three Metrics Internal growth at a school Comparison to other participating schools College readiness
    • 20. FORMATIVE FEEDBACK
    • 21.  
    • 22.  
    • 23. FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
    • 24.
      • DAY ONE:
      • APPROACHING PEDAGOGY
      • What is authentic assessment?
      • How does teaching support that (and vice versa)?
      • What higher order skills do we value? Why?
      • How are higher order skills demonstrated?
    • 25.
      • DAY TWO:
      • BUILDING PERFORMANCE TASKS
      • What are the components of a performance task?
      • How do we effectively build them?
      • Workshop/Sharing/Feedback
    • 26.  
    • 27. BEST PRACTICES: ST. GREGORY COLLEGE PREP
    • 28. BEST PRACTICES: ST. GREGORY COLLEGE PREP Jonathan Martin: Head of School
    • 29. Value and Purposes in Administering CWRA
      • An Elevated Focus on Outcomes:
      • NAIS Commission on Accreditation Criterion 13:
      • The standards require a school to provide evidence of a thoughtful process, respectful of its mission, for the collection and use in school decision-making of data (both internal and external) about student learning.
    • 30. Value and Purposes of CWRA: Signaling to Families
      • From NAIS mongraph: Student Outcomes that Measure the School’s Value-Added
      • NAIS schools are not immune to externally imposed pressures to articulate their added value. Independent schools are now being challenged to show how their educational model generates what it does and how it is worth the investment.
      • Any value-added test aims to assess the progress that students have experienced over time, often from the beginning of their education until their graduation. The advantage of value-added testing is that it shows growth from a starting point and thereby factors out other variables such as class or race. 
    • 31. Value and Purposes of CWRA: Signaling to Prospective Families
      • Marketing our Schools
      • Great way to put some substance and evidence into assertions that our school teaches critical thinking, problem solving, and effective writing: we all say this, but some skeptical parents want the evidence.
      • I can say our students performed at the 97th percentile of all college freshman
    • 32. Value and Purposes of CWRA: Signaling to Faculty
      • Leadership of Learning
        • Beginning with End in Mind, or Backward Design, is a great way School-leaders can influence teaching and learning without micromanaging, and CWRA is such a tool.
    • 33. Value and Purposes of CWRA: Signaling to Students
      • Understandable to Fear Student Negative Reaction: Too many tests, Road to Nowhere.
      • But, students respond well to it, and it signals to them what is most important about their learning.
    • 34. www.tinyurl.stgregscwra
    • 35. BEST PRACTICES: THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL
    • 36. BEST PRACTICES: THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL Kevin Mattingly: Dean of Faculty
    • 37.  
    • 38.
      • INSTITUTIONS ARE EQUIPPED TO IMPROVE HIGHER-ORDER SKILLS WHEN THEY CONNECT TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT THROUGH AUTHENTIC PERFORMANCE-BASED PRACTICES.
    • 39.  
    • 40. LOGISTICS
    • 41.
      • ASSESSMENT
      • Online
      • Fall/Spring assessment windows
      • 105 minutes of testing
      • $40 Per student (minimum $2,000)
    • 42.
      • PERFORMANCE TASK ACADEMIES Regional/Institution-Exclusive models
      • Academy 101/Academy 102
      • Developing coaching model
      • $595/$6,000
    • 43. LEARN MORE: CWRA twitter |@cla_beat Website: Assessment | www.cae.org/cwra Website: PT Academies | www.claintheclassroom.org Email | [email_address] Phone | 212.217.0845 Enroll | www.collegiatelearningassessment.org/enrollment
    • 44. LEARN MORE: ST. GREGORY COLLEGE PREP twitter |@JonathanEmartin Website: St. Gregory | www.stgregoryschool.org Blog:| www.21k12blog.net Email | [email_address] Phone | 520.327.6395
    • 45. LEARN MORE: THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL Website: | www.lawrenceville.org Email | [email_address] Phone | 609.895.2061
    • 46. UPCOMING EVENTS cwra ROAD SHOW | April 6 | NEW YORK, NY cwra ROAD SHOW | May | LOS ANGELES, CA cwra ROAD SHOW | May | BOSTON, MA Performance Task Academy | May 31-June 1 | NEW YORK, NY Performance Task Academy | July 30-31 | PITTSBURGH, PA cwra ROAD SHOW | forthcoming | ATLANTA, GA Opening of Fall Testing Window | August 15 | ASSESSMENT