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GENERAL ASSEMBLY: Job Standup PT2

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This programme at General Assembly is designed to help full-time students as they prepare for a new career in web development. …

This programme at General Assembly is designed to help full-time students as they prepare for a new career in web development.

The Job Standup is a tailored to GA web development and UX courses, during which the students participate in job readiness trainings, share their experiences in the job market, and offer support and strategies to each other.

This session covers pitching, CVs, Github, Networks, Portfolio, Blogging, Cover Letters, Interviews, & More.

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. JOB STANDUP JOB STANDUP SESSION PT2
  • 2. JOB STANDUP JONAS ALTMAN @SFAGENCY @JONAS THESOCIALFABRIC.COM
  • 3. JOB STANDUP AGENDA . More CV + Portfolio Move em’ Know what you want Pre-Interview Interview Post Interview Negotiation You’re in a good place Exercises • CV/LinkedIn/Portfolio Surgeries • Hot Seat!
  • 4. JOB STANDUP CAREER = RUNNING COURSE
  • 5. JOB STANDUP
  • 6. JOB STANDUP CV /PORTFOLIO
  • 7. JOB STANDUP
  • 8. JOB STANDUP 1. WHO? 2. WHAT? 3. WHY? 4. INVITE.. INGREDIENTS 4
  • 9. JOB STANDUP YA GO ON YOURSELF [AGAIN].
  • 10. JOB STANDUP Don’t have a university/hotmail/yahoo email address (gmail, own domain, me.com, or anything else) Do have have a website/blog/portfolio + /or twitter account Do have and highlight relevant experience Do start with referrals, close / loose ties [ie folks that know or have heard of you]
  • 11. JOB STANDUP
  • 12. JOB STANDUP
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  • 16. JOB STANDUP
  • 17. JOB STANDUP
  • 18. JOB STANDUP CV/PORTFOLIO surgery
  • 19. JOB STANDUP Know what you want
  • 20. JOB STANDUP
  • 21. JOB STANDUP
  • 22. JOB STANDUP
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  • 27. JOB STANDUP
  • 28. JOB STANDUP HOW DO WEB DEVS GET JOBS? HOW DO WEB DEVS GET JOBS?
  • 29. JOB STANDUP
  • 30. JOB STANDUP The best way to join the tech community? Enhance your marketability? And find a new job? is through... PEOPLE EVENTS & CONVERSATIONS
  • 31. JOB STANDUP Hiring is largely governed by old-school methods & word of mouth 33% 27% 15% 42% 30% 13% Co-workers / Peer Referrals Customers / Suppliers Former Colleagues Social Media [aka LinkedIn] SEARCH SELECTION The Interview Gut Feeling for Fit w/ Company Culture Recommendation from peer
  • 32. JOB STANDUP “Let’s face it, applicants have been known to ‘elaborate’ on their experience. ...Leaders take CVs with a grain of salt” 5% SELECTION Experience on CV - Alexa Von Tobel, Founder LearnVest.com
  • 33. JOB STANDUP
  • 34. JOB STANDUP
  • 35. JOB STANDUP WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FOR? . . PURPOSE FREEDOM .VALIDATION .MASTERY MOST IMPORTANTLY
  • 36. JOB STANDUP
  • 37. JOB STANDUP IN TER VIEW
  • 38. JOB STANDUP
  • 39. JOB STANDUP 33% 25% 16% 9% 7% Let the conversation flow Focus on skills & job knowledge Focus on unique interests / capabilities THE INTERVIEW Focus on personality Use structured questions
  • 40. JOB STANDUP % Personal Presentation & Attire THE INTERVIEW
  • 41. JOB STANDUP The process Get your information to the hiring manager. They have a mechanism for screening out, not in. Initial screen. Can be over coffee, on the phone, or in their office. Usually focuses on interest, soft skills, etc., but always be prepared to answer technical questions if you’re meeting a non-recruiter Some kind of homework or project, often in advance of interview. Onsite interviews, usually with 2+ members of the team. You can expect to have a test and answer technical questions. Social + soft skills informal test Final ‘sell’ conversations. Offer!
  • 42. JOB STANDUP Qualities beyond coding that are valuable Curiosity Interpersonal + communication skills Creative+ innovative thinking Logical approaches to problem solving Confidence to ask questions and deliver feedback Enthusiasm about technology+ knowing the competitive landscape Ability to prioritize the highest impact tasks Understanding of external and internal constraints - Empathy Data driven with strong analytical skills Self motivated + disciplined Detail oriented Patience and level-headedness General business acumen
  • 43. JOB STANDUP Tips from Neil Roseman, Amazon.com [Questions a decision maker will ask themslves or you] Can this person improve the probability of your company’s success? Probe when you see a long list of skills on CV. Separate truth from filler. Ask probing questions about their CV to get at what they did, not what they observed. Ask candidates questions that are relevant to problems your company actually faces. Use some questions that are vague and open-ended. See if they ask you questions to find out more. Personality fit question: Do you consider yourself lucky? Make it tough but fun.
  • 44. JOB STANDUP S T A R Situation: The interviewer wants you to present a recent challenge and situation in which you found yourself. Task: What did you have to achieve? The interviewer will be looking to see what you were trying to achieve from the situation. Action: What did you do? The interviewer will be looking for information on what you did, why you did it and what the alternatives were. Results: What was the outcome of your actions? What did you achieve through your actions and did you meet your objectives? What did you learn from this experience and have you used this learning since?
  • 45. JOB STANDUP Q U E S How do I know if this interview is going well? Nonverbal cues – facial expression, tone of voice, pause length, body language, etc. Ask if your responses are on track, but not for an evaluation. How do I feel? What’s my gut instinct What did they say about next steps?
  • 46. JOB STANDUP Thank you: -It’s okay to ask for contact information for your interviewers. -Be specific on any items, next steps, recaps -Remind them of your enthusiasm. -Keep it short and sweet. - It’s good etiquette to thank people at the end of each interview - Give a firm handshake, and if appropriate use their first name while making eye contact Follow-up: -Based on what they said about next steps, it’s okay to ask fo updates if they are taking longer than anticipated. Just use your judgment and be polite
  • 47. JOB STANDUPTAKE THE STEP Don’t wear a suit or dress in a overly formal way. Wear something that makes you feel comfortable and confident. If unsure of the dress code, just ask. Don’t be late. If you have an emergency causing you to be late, let the team know ASAP. It’s a good idea to get a contact number in advance of the interview. Don’t bring food or gum into the interview room. It can be distracting, and some consider it to be rude. Be nice to everyone, from the receptionist to the CEO. Get a good night’s sleep. Pee before and Power pose if you wish. JOB STANDUP
  • 48. JOB STANDUP
  • 49. JOB STANDUP Information Technology Academia Public Relations Media Production Business Development Banking Business Analysis Project Management Advertising Product Design Entrepreneurship & More S U P E R S T A R S
  • 50. JOB STANDUP IT’S TIME TO TEST YOUR.. • Presentation skills • How you organize information • Logical flow • Art of story-telling • Speaking from the heart • Ability to separate relevant from irrelevant information • Confidence in your journey
  • 51. JOB STANDUP Practice telling your story. Outloud. Several times.
  • 52. JOB STANDUP DO: • Prepare and practice your response • Contain response within 2 minutes • Analyze listing • Note interviewer body language • Tailored top-down review: > Summarize professional background and education > Review each relevant experience > Highlight notable points
  • 53. JOB STANDUP DON’T: • Bog down into too much details • Digress from the thread of your story • Mention irrelevant points • Read from your resume • Ramble
  • 54. JOB STANDUP BEHAVIOUR QUESTIONS What you should expect to talk about with your recruiter or the CEO/hiring manager: What’s important to you (type of work, culture, team size, company mission, colleague caliber, technologies, benefits, learning opportunities, etc.) What technologies you most love using, and what your strengths as a developer are. Why this particular company is compelling to you, and what you hope to contribute. Why you left your last job. And jobs before that. Your previous work and coding projects. Your professional goals and motivations. Anything that is on your CV, particularly things that could be construed as red flags, like gaps in employment.
  • 55. JOB STANDUP more BEHAVIOUR QUESTIONS Tell me about how you worked effectively under pressure. How do you handle a challenge? Provide an example. Give an example of a goal you’ve reached and how you did it. Have you ever disagreed with a company policy? How did you handle it? How do you partner with non-technical members of your company on creating new products? When you find something wrong with your product or approach, what do you do? Have you ever found a project you were working on slipping from it's timeline? How did you deal with the situation? What do you do if you disagree with your boss? Share an example of when you’ve motivated your teammates. Did you ever work on a group project? Describe your role. What makes you excited to go to work?
  • 56. JOB STANDUP FEEDBACK TIME Practice Appreciative Inquiry aka Emphasise the Good.
  • 57. JOB STANDUP Psychological Contract the relationship between an employer and its employees specifically concerns mutual expectations of inputs and outcomes the
  • 58. JOB STANDUP Psychological Contract The balancing act between: How you are treated by an employer What you put into the job the +
  • 59. JOB STANDUP Interests over positions
  • 60. SALARY NEGOTIATION JOB STANDUP
  • 61. JOB STANDUP
  • 62. JOB STANDUP
  • 63. JOB STANDUP What if pay comes up in the interview or very early on in the recruiting process? Put it right back to the employer Mention your current or past salary if you feel it is appropriate and explain it’s based on your education and experience,. Then ask the employer to proivde a salary range for the role in question If you are actually wanting more money than your current or past salary then expalin that you enjoy[ed] working at your company but feel you are underpaid
  • 64. JOB STANDUP LET”S NEGOTIATE Companies will expect you to negotiate. Wait a day after receiving your offer. Be enthusiastic about the offer [really!] Be objective and realistic. Keep your emotions in check Wait for them to answer. ALWAYS Get it in writing.
  • 65. JOB STANDUP Negotiate or not? Only if the salary too low Agressive negotation? Practice the golden rule Negotiate on equity? Case by case. Avoid be insulting (ie. asking for less equity and higher base) If company is doing or likely to do very well - explore options through discussion What are you worth? Determine an acceptable range. Market data + personal needs + [track recrord]
  • 66. JOB STANDUP "Once they've decided that they have to have you, only then are you in the position to negotiate” -Dan Martineau President of Martineau Recruiting Technology
  • 67. JOB STANDUP Don’t Bargain over Positions Separate the People from the Problem Focus on Interests, Not Positions Invent Options for Mutual Gain Insitsist on Using Objective Criteria from Getting to Yes Roger Fisher & William Ury
  • 68. JOB STANDUP Get your salary request out first ? Have the employer tell you the salary first? or
  • 69. JOB STANDUP vs At the early stages of recruiting process if salary expecations come up - consider being vague and saying you’re interested in a mutually rewarding career with the company and are confident you can agree to a fitting compensation package. In instances that you believe the company may not be able to afford you, consider testing the waters by asking them for a ballpark figure or salary range. This can save you time and help you focus your energies.
  • 70. JOB STANDUP BUT HERE”S SOME GENERAL TIPS + HINTS Research has shown that the first number mentioned establishes the salary range in the context of the discussion You can often gage when the employer is seeking to have you provide a figure as they: 1) Do not provide a salary or a range in the advertisement; 2) Are not forthcoming when you ask for the salary or range; and; 3) Push the question back on you to tell them what you are seeking As a rule of thumb, if you ask for the top of the range (or a little bit more) it’s quite feasible that when they accept you will be you securing a higher end of the possible salary range Keep in mind that an employer’s initial offer is rarely the real budget. You can assume that the range is known to the employer, and you can always site your sources if they act surprised SO... if you are unsure of what to ask and are open to what they are offering, ask them for the salary every time. If you are confident in what figure you want and this plays a significant factor in your decision making then provide it to them, and.. CASE BY CASE ..let them know you know your worth. [Debatable} but as a rule of thumb you want the employer to make the first salary offer
  • 71. JOB STANDUP
  • 72. JOB STANDUP Precise number makes sense during a negotiation Malia Mason, lead researcher in a study published in The Journal of Experimental Social Psychology says that using a precise number instead of rounded numbers will give you a strong anchor Your quantitative estimate gives the message to an employer the magnitude of error around the estimate they could expect USE PRECISE NUMBERS [ie don’t ask for £40,000, as for $38,500] [and the appearance that you've done your research] [Even when giving a range, you should use precise numbers]
  • 73. JOB STANDUP COUNTEROFFERS • Below average market rate • Lack of benefits offset may justify a bump in base • You have a higher offer on the table • Factual reasons why you are asking for more £ • Request a face-to-face [or call] to negotiate • Emphasise and express eagerness to work • Ensure your tone is not displaying a threat or finality [always base it on the facts] • Always counteroffer but never twice!
  • 74. JOB STANDUP Emphasise your economic value [money you save and make for an employer] Highlight your value-added qualities, that extra skill you bring Relationships and network influence can aslo be a benefit to highlight What else you can do
  • 75. JOB STANDUP BATNABest Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement
  • 76. JOB STANDUP Timing is Everything When is the company holding performance reviews? Have you secured another job offer? Are you being asked to take on more responsibility?
  • 77. JOB STANDUP Money Happiness
  • 78. JOB STANDUP POWER of “I’m going to have a think and come back to you [by X]
  • 79. JOB STANDUP PLAY HARD TO GET or MISHANDLE MULTIPLE OFFERS PLAY HARDBALL BE UNPREPARED BE DISILLUSIONED UNDERESTIIMATE YOUR WORTH LIE DON’T
  • 80. JOB STANDUP You will be asked what you previously made (compensation, equity, benefits) -What are you expecting from this new job? - How honest should I be? -Should I expect to make more than before? -Do I draw a hard line? What do companies consider? -Your previous experience (education + work] -Impact of role -Current employees -Interview performance -Industry data + standards -Your previous compensation, expectations
  • 81. JOB STANDUP CONSIDERATIONS -The business: Trajectory, culture, values, product, potential -The job: Tasks, scope, autonomy, technologies, learning potential -The commitment: Location, hours, career growth, people -Salary + benefits: Budget, industry research, must haves vs. nice to haves -your GUT
  • 82. JOB STANDUP QUESTIONS? I have multiple offers? Should I tell the companies? Should I mention what companies the offers are with? I have different deadlines for the offers? A company threatens to pull my offer if you don’t answer on the spot? Friends and family advise you to choose the offer you’re least excited about? You don’t have a [proper] work visa?
  • 83. JOB STANDUP Get it in writing Always. [aka if they won’t put it in writing, somethings up]
  • 84. JOB STANDUP
  • 85. JOB STANDUP HOT SEAT!
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  • 88. JOB STANDUP
  • 89. JOB STANDUP HUMBLY CONFIDENTCONFIDENTLY HUMBLE
  • 90. JOB STANDUP Practice Perfect
  • 91. JOB STANDUP p e r s i s t e n c e
  • 92. JOB STANDUP