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  • 1. Introduction to Wireless Networks ACCESS POINT (AP) 802.11G BANDWIDTH BROADBAND DIGITAL MEDIA ADAPTER WI-FI (WIRELESS-FIDELITY): 802.11B (DMA) HOTSPOT DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE DIGITAL MEDIA HUB WIRELESS PC CARD (DSL) FIREWALL WIRELESS LOCAL AREA HIGH-SPEED CABLE HUB NETWORK (WLAN) INTERNET RANGE LOCAL AREA NETWORK WIRELESS ROUTER ROUTER (LAN) 802.11B: Commonly known as "Wi-Fi," it is a networking standard for wireless local area networks (WLAN). 802.11b-based WLANs are very common and can achieve a data rate of 11 Mbps at distances up to 300 feet. 802.11G: A newer Wi-Fi standard for WLANs, it features data rates up to 54 Mbps. Devices certified for use on 802.11g networks are also compatible with 802.11b devices. BROADBAND: Common term applied to high-speed data transmission, such as cable or DSL. Broadband technology provides faster connections to the Internet than traditional dial-up services. Broadband services deliver high-speed Internet access to households and businesses while freeing up telephone lines for regular use. LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN): A computer network that spans a relatively small area, connecting computers so that users can communicate with one another, share data and access devices such as printers. DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE (DSL): DSL is a broadband technology that enables high-speed Internet access to a home or business over a standard telephone line. DSL is an always-on connection to the Internet that allows for simultaneous PC and telephone use. ACCESS POINT (AP): A hub that can connect many wireless devices, including PCs, to a WLAN or the Internet. It can be a standalone hardware device or a computer with a wireless network adapter and appropriate software. Access Points can support 802.11a, b or g standards. BANDWIDTH: The transmission capacity of a network. Think of bandwidth as being similar to the diameter of a pipeline: the wider the pipe, the more water can flow through it. Similarly, the wider a network's bandwidth, the more data can pass over it. DIGITAL MEDIA ADAPTER (DMA): A device that enables a PC to wirelessly distribute digital content such as photos and music to networked consumer electronic devices like TVs and stereos. DIGITAL MEDIA HUB: A powerful, flexible, feature-rich PC used to store digital content like photos, audio and video, and to distribute it to networked devices such as TVs and stereos.
  • 2. HIGH-SPEED CABLE INTERNET: A broadband technology provided by cable service operators. This technology enables high-speed Internet access over the standard television cable connection. ROUTER: A device that forwards data from one local area network (LAN) to another. Routers can read the network address in each transmission and choose the most efficient route, depending on current traffic, line costs, speed, bad connections, and other factors. HOTSPOT: A wireless hotspot is a public location such as an airport, shopping mall or conference centre that has readily accessible wireless Internet access. RANGE: Refers to the physical distance over which a wireless network operates reliably. Most Wi-Fi networks support a range of a hundred feet or more. Depending on the environment and the type of antenna used, Wi-Fi signals can have a range of up to one mile. WIRELESS ROUTER: A wireless router is a network device that routes Internet traffic across several wireless or wired networks. Wireless routers are used to build independent WLANs that can communicate with one another and the Internet. Some Access Points can function either as a wireless gateway or wireless router, while other devices function solely as a wireless router. HUB: A network device that connects multiple computers and other devices to a LAN so they can communicate with one another and the Internet. All users connected to a hub share the available network bandwidth. WI-FI (WIRELESS-FIDELITY): A name applied to equipment that complies with the wireless standard, as defined by the Wi-Fi Alliance. Wi-Fi logos help identify wireless networking components that are certified to work in WLANs. WIRELESS LOCAL AREA NETWORK (WLAN) A WLAN is a wireless implementation of a LAN that allows users to move around with their device. Essentially, a WLAN provides the same connectivity features as a LAN, but without wires. WLANs enable users to quickly build a network of computers without installing cables, freeing them to move from place to place without losing connectivity. FIREWALL: A system that secures a network, shielding it from access by unauthorized users. Firewalls can be implemented via software, hardware or a combination of both. In addition to preventing unrestricted access to a network, a firewall can also restrict data from flowing out of a network. WIRELESS PC CARD: An 802.11 WLAN adapter that fits into a slot in a notebook or desktop computer. Wireless PC cards enable a user to connect to wireless networks. A wireless PC card and a PC can also be used to share an Internet connection with a WLAN.
  • 3. Introduction to Wireless Networks ACCESS POINT (AP) 802.11G BANDWIDTH BROADBAND DIGITAL MEDIA ADAPTER WI-FI (WIRELESS-FIDELITY): 802.11B (DMA) HOTSPOT DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE DIGITAL MEDIA HUB WIRELESS PC CARD (DSL) FIREWALL WIRELESS LOCAL AREA HIGH-SPEED CABLE HUB NETWORK (WLAN) INTERNET RANGE LOCAL AREA NETWORK WIRELESS ROUTER ROUTER (LAN) __________ Commonly known as "Wi-Fi," it is a networking standard for wireless local area networks (WLAN). __________-based WLANs are very common and can achieve a data rate of 11 Mbps at distances up to 300 feet. __________A newer Wi-Fi standard for WLANs, it features data rates up to 54 Mbps. Devices certified for use on __________networks are also compatible with 802.11b devices. __________Common term applied to high-speed data transmission, such as cable or DSL. __________ technology provides faster connections to the Internet than traditional dial-up services. __________ services deliver high-speed Internet access to households and businesses while freeing up telephone lines for regular use. __________A computer network that spans a relatively small area, connecting computers so that users can communicate with one another, share data and access devices such as printers. __________is a broadband technology that enables high-speed Internet access to a home or business over a standard telephone line. __________ is an always-on connection to the Internet that allows for simultaneous PC and telephone use. ____________________A hub that can connect many wireless devices, including PCs, to a WLAN or the Internet. It can be a standalone hardware device or a computer with a wireless network adapter and appropriate software. __________can support 802.11a, b or g standards. __________The transmission capacity of a network. Think of bandwidth as being similar to the diameter of a pipeline: the wider the pipe, the more water can flow through it. Similarly, the wider a network's __________, the more data can pass over it. __________A device that enables a PC to wirelessly distribute digital content such as photos and music to networked consumer electronic devices like TVs and stereos. ____________________A powerful, flexible, feature-rich PC used to store digital content like photos, audio and video, and to distribute it to networked devices such as TVs and stereos. ____________________A broadband technology provided by cable service operators. This technology enables high-speed Internet access over the standard television cable connection.
  • 4. __________A device that forwards data from one local area network (LAN) to another. __________ can read the network address in each transmission and choose the most efficient route, depending on current traffic, line costs, speed, bad connections, and other factors. __________A wireless hotspot is a public location such as an airport, shopping mall or conference centre that has readily accessible wireless Internet access. __________Refers to the physical distance over which a wireless network operates reliably. Most Wi-Fi networks support a range of a hundred feet or more. Depending on the environment and the type of antenna used, Wi-Fi signals can have a range of up to one mile. __________A wireless router is a network device that routes Internet traffic across several wireless or wired networks. Wireless routers are used to build independent WLANs that can communicate with one another and the Internet. Some Access Points can function either as a wireless gateway or wireless router, while other devices function solely as a wireless router. __________A network device that connects multiple computers and other devices to a LAN so they can communicate with one another and the Internet. All users connected to a hub share the available network bandwidth. __________A name applied to equipment that complies with the wireless standard, as defined by the __________ Alliance. Wi-Fi logos help identify wireless networking components that are certified to work in WLANs. ____________________is a wireless implementation of a LAN that allows users to move around with their device. Essentially, a WLAN provides the same connectivity features as a LAN, but without wires. WLANs enable users to quickly build a network of computers without installing cables, freeing them to move from place to place without losing connectivity. ____________________A system that secures a network, shielding it from access by unauthorized users. Firewalls can be implemented via software, hardware or a combination of both. In addition to preventing unrestricted access to a network, a firewall can also restrict data from flowing out of a network. ____________________An 802.11 WLAN adapter that fits into a slot in a notebook or desktop computer. Wireless PC cards enable a user to connect to wireless networks. A wireless PC card and a PC can also be used to share an Internet connection with a WLAN.