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Transcript

  • 1. Implementation of Wireless Fidelity Technology Presented By: Matthew Geis Johnson Wei
  • 2. Maturation of Wi-Fi (History)
    • Brett Stewart is in charge of deal with Xircom license of original Wi-Fi technology
    • Plancom is founded, the predecessor of Wayport, which was created a year later
    • The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) finalized the initial standard for wireless LANs, IEEE 802.11 in 1997
    • In the summer of 1998, Apple Airpot became mainstream
    • Nokia, along with 5 other industry leaders; 3Com, Aironet, Intersil, Lucent Technologies, and Symbol Technologies, united to form the Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (WECA) which later becomes Wi-Fi Alliance
    • Problems with WEP, advent of WPA, other standards released
  • 3. Wi-Fi Technology
    • Four IEEE WLAN Standards
      • 802.11b
      • 802.11a
      • 802.11g
      • 802.11n
  • 4. IEEE WLAN Standard 802.11b
    • Ratified in 1999.
    • Point to multi-point.
    • Data transfer up to 11 megabits per second.
    • May be setup for point-to-point for faster speeds.
    • Compatible with 802.11g and 802.11n.
    • 2.4 gigahertz band.
      • Interference.
  • 5. IEEE WLAN Standard 802.11a
    • Ratified in 1999.
    • Data transfer up to 54 megabits per second.
    • Compatible with 802.11n
    • 5 gigahertz band.
      • More easily absorbed by objects, need more line of sight for good connection.
      • More access points needed.
      • Later improvements led to a stronger signal.
  • 6. IEEE WLAN Standard 802.11g
    • Ratified in 2003.
    • Data transfer up to 54 megabits per second.
    • Compatible with 802.11b and 802.11n.
    • Combines the transfer speed of 802.11a with the strong signal of 802.11b.
    • 2.4 gigahertz band.
      • Interference worse than 802.11b.
  • 7. IEEE WLAN Standard 802.11n
    • Currently under development.
    • Compatible with 802.11b, 802.11a, and 802.11g.
    • Potential transfer speeds range from 100 megabits per second to 540 megabits per second.
    • Uses multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO).
      • Resolves Multi-path signals.
    • Uses orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM).
      • Single source, multiple signals.
  • 8. Advantage over Wired Ethernet
    • Faster than 10BaseT Ethernet cables.
    • Easier to setup network
      • Cheaper and quicker.
      • Access Points and Wireless Network Adapter.
    • Mobility
  • 9. WiMAX…the future of wireless?
    • WiMAX not yet ready.
      • Still in test phase.
    • Supposed to handle 70 megabits per second over 30 miles.
      • Test done by AT&T last month produced 500 kilobits per second over 3 to 5 miles.
    • Wi-Fi currently more practical, 802.11n boasts similar speeds.
      • Wi-Fi Industrial access point - $2000
    • Extremely expensive.
      • Good for 3 rd world countries with no wire infrastructure.
  • 10. Now What?
    • The future is “Business on the Go”
    • End users desire and value
      • ease of use
      • portability/mobility
    • These traits are undeniable in Wi-Fi technology