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CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ
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CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORKÂ

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  • danger of “out of the box” (default) configurations
  • SWAN is an architecture that consists of the following components: Infrastructure Access Points – APs that service clients and use the services of the WDS for features like Fast Secure Roaming WDS Access Points – devices that have been chosen to run the WDS services…these devices are logically in-line between the Infrastructure APs and higher level management devices such as WLSE or CiscoSecure ACS. WLSE – a management appliance that collects information from SWAN-capable devices and manages the configuration and deployment of all wireless devices
  • Introduced to minimize the amount of unnecessary WLAN traffic across the LAN/WAN by having the WDS AP collect and store data to be used by other non-WDS (infrastructure) APs. Fast secure roaming - user security credentials cached in WDS AP RM – as infrastructure APs and scanning clients gather RF data, the WDS AP collects this data to be aggregated and sent to WLSE for reporting How many APs can be supported is a complex issue. The engineering answer is it depends on; the number of clients per AP and how "busy" those clients are. Obviously these attributes will be variable in a real customers network. Because of the engineering difficulty in providing a maximum number, Product Management has provided a "maximum supported" number of 30 APs per WDS for fast secure roaming. 30 APs was determined to be a reasonable number based on product engineering estimates, devtest testing and product management requirements. 60 APs per WDS is supported with a dedicated AP (no 802.11 service) Further testing has shown that up to 100 AP’s may be supported in dedicated mode, 60 in 802.11-serving mode.
  • Lets take a look at the key application features of the WLSE.
  • LEAP Server: Release 1 is only LEAP, future releases will support new implementations; currently on the roadmap are PEAP and Microsoft’s EAP-TLS. Note that the technique is: ACS server  RADIUS  WLSE, where the WLSE is acting as both AP and client An arguably more useful approach might be: ACS server  RADIUS  AP  EAP over Ethernet  WLSE. Here the WLSE is acting as a client only. Verifies that users can be authenticated. Could monitor CPU, mem utilization, etc. on the ACS server since W2K server implements HOST-RESOURCES-MIB, but these data tell you only the state of the server—the Radius service could still be down. Faults could be generated if the authentication performance becomes degraded, or if authentication fails LEAP server summary report Basic info about the LEAP server (IP address/hostname, etc.) + current fault status Device fault history (history of the faults on the AP) Performance Report (visible as a graph—give up to date info. about transaction time) Switch Summary Report Basic switch information—IP Address, sysName, sysDescription, + other MIB-II data Connected AP report shows the relationship between the switch and APs Device fault history shows history of faults on the switch Fault/Perf. Monitoring Thresholds—OK, degraded, overloaded based on percentages. You define how severe the impact is. Reports: Summary Report—MAC, IP, FW version, #users currently connected, group(s) belonged to, fault status, model, system name, SSID, root or repeater, SW version, Link to client association report, link to detailed report Detail Report—summary report + subnet mask, gateway, ensure compatibility with [2 Mbps clients | 802.11 | None], SNMP trap destination, Count of AP observed by this AP, Current operating frequency channel, Ethernet port status, radio port status, current power level, switch IP, switch name, fault status, encryption type, authentication type, key length, LEAP server IP, LEAP server name Client Association Report—List of currently associated clients Security Report—Encryption type, Authentication type, Key length, LEAP server IP, LEAP server name Device Fault History—List of historical faults on the AP Performance report—RF throughput (ifInOctets, ifOutOctets, ifSpeed, sysUpTime from RFC 1213 MIB), Ethernet throughput (ifInOctets, ifOutOctets, ifSpeed, sysUpTime from RFC 1213 MIB), number of associations, link to detail report) Transmission Success—transmit vs. receive vs. retries Thresholds—OK, degraded, overloaded based on percentages. You define how severe the impact is. Reports: Summary Report—MAC, IP, FW version, #users currently connected, group(s) belonged to, fault status, model, system name, SSID, root or repeater, SW version, Link to client association report, link to detailed report Detail Report—summary report + subnet mask, gateway, ensure compatibility with [2 Mbps clients | 802.11 | None], SNMP trap destination, Count of AP observed by this AP, Current operating frequency channel, Ethernet port status, radio port status, current power level, switch IP, switch name, fault status, encryption type, authentication type, key length, LEAP server IP, LEAP server name Client Association Report—List of currently associated clients Security Report—Encryption type, Authentication type, Key length, LEAP server IP, LEAP server name Device Fault History—List of historical faults on the AP Performance report—RF throughput (ifInOctets, ifOutOctets, ifSpeed, sysUpTime from RFC 1213 MIB), Ethernet throughput (ifInOctets, ifOutOctets, ifSpeed, sysUpTime from RFC 1213 MIB), number of associations, link to detail report) Transmission Success—transmit vs. receive vs. retries Groups System-defined group based on some criteria or rules—membership defined by evaluation at a point in time. Most common criteria User-defined groups—users can arbitrarily select and assign devices into groups. Dynamic—membership in group(s) is determined by evaluation of association rules every time membership is queried. All system defined groups are dynamic. Static—Membership is constant and defined at creation time unless it is explicitly edited. All user defined groups are static… Unless they contain a system define group… What are some other useful system defined groups? Devices are placed in system defined groups at the time of discovery or upon evaluation Reports: Group Summary—Number of connected users, list of APs in the group, “user entered field”, link to AP reports, group status (highest fault state of devices in the group) Group security—encryption type, authentication type, key length, LEAP server IP, LEAP server hostname Performance report—RF throughput (ifInOctets, ifOutOctets, ifSpeed, sysUpTime from RFC 1213 MIB), number of associations Configuration: Won’t do switch ports in this release… To enable/disable an AP or bridge we’ll disable the radio. Issues: device becomes unreachable if we disable an AP, could be non-Cisco APs, switches. Requires community strings… Templates: WLSE contains default templates Users can create new templates All templates can be edited of cloned Undo only rolls back configuration to last configuration (not config archive like in RME) Rollback question-- Apparently, Nagesh said that just going back to the factory default config is enough.  This came up because Clare found out that when they try to copy the config to save it, now all of the APs variables are copied.  So right now we can't do a complete undo. Is going back to factory default enough? Client: MIBs: RFC 1213 (MIB-II), RFC 1493 (Bridge MIB), Cisco Aironet Access Point MIB, IEEE802dot11 MIB, CDP MIB Current Client association report: client name, IP address, MAC, name of AP/bridge currently associated with, link to AP/Bridge summary report, type of wireless device Note: association is assumed to be stable (I.e. flipping associations is taken as an error rather than association) Events based on polled values, association/disassociation traps Client Error Report: Client name, IP address, MAC, Name of AP/bridge trying to associate with, Link to AP/bridge summary report, type of device like AP/Bridge it’s trying to associate with, link to AP/bridge summary report to which last associated. Problem diagnosis: Traps like authentication, de-authentication, auth. fail, disassociation, etc. We are making an effort to observe the sequence of some of these traps so we can pre-define some client faults (still under investigation) Polled data (phase II): 802.11 specific values for forwarding tables on an AP/bridge track the state of the client. There are some of these states that won’t send a trap so this helps give some advanced diagnosis of client association problems. Client Association Report (Historical): Client name, IP address, MAC, current state, link to AP/bridge summary report For last 10 associations: name and link to the associated AP, connect time (association trap), duration of association (if possible—there may be clients associated when we discover the AP) Requires association/disassociation event correlation Client Statistics Report: Client name, IP address, MAC, Name of AP/bridge currently associated with, link to AP/bridge summary report, type of wireless device (AP or bridge), Client stats like packets sent, packets received, packet errors Polled from AP on a demand basis when report for the client is launched. Client Error Report: Client name, IP address, MAC, current state and link to AP report For last 10 errors: Name of AP/bridge trying to associate with Error start time Duration of error
  • Transcript

    • 1. CISCO STRUCTURED WIRELESS-AWARE NETWORK A SOLUTIONS APPROACH TO WLAN KOEN JACOBS – SYSTEMS ENGINEER – [email_address] www.cisco.com/go/wireless/
    • 2. CISCO WLAN EXTENDS THE MULTISERVICE NETWORK © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID
    • 3. Bringing Intelligent Services to WLAN <ul><li>Security </li></ul><ul><li>QoS </li></ul><ul><li>VLANs </li></ul><ul><li>… </li></ul>interface Dot11Radio0 no ip address no ip route-cache encryption key 1 size 40bit 7 7823F25A0AB8 transmit-key encryption mode wep mandatory ! ssid tsunami authentication open guest-mode ! End-to-End IOS = End-to-End Intelligence!
    • 4. Security in WLANs <ul><li>Still the number 1 concern! </li></ul><ul><li>Wardriving & Warchalking </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting a lot of press </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Still many poorly protected WLANs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SSID != Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MAC Filters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>802.11 Standard WEP </li></ul></ul>Credit: KNTV San Jose
    • 5. Cisco Wireless Security Suite Security in the Enterprise No WEP and Broadcast Mode Wi-Fi 40-bit, 128-bit, and Static WEP Dynamic Key Management System, Mutual Authentication, and 802.1x via EAP Public Access No Security Telecommuter and Small Business Basic Security Mid-Market and Enterprise Enhanced Security
    • 6. Cisco Wireless Security Suite www.cisco.com/go/aironet/security <ul><li>Wireless LAN Security consists of three components </li></ul><ul><li>The Authentication Framework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IEEE 802.1x authentication framework supports many authentication types & the link layer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Authentication Algorithm </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EAP Cisco Wireless (LEAP) and EAP-FAST support centralized, user-based authentication with the ability to generate dynamic WEP keys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Idem for PEAP * , but also supports OTPs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Encryption Algorithm = WEP for 802.11 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cisco was the first to augment WEP encryption through TKIP * (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) - same functionality now part of WPA, under the name CKIP </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Message Integrity Check (MIC) mitigates man-in-the-middle attacks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Per-Packet Keying mitigates WEP key derivation attacks e.g. AirSnort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Broadcast Key Rotation </li></ul></ul>* 802.11i draft
    • 7. Cisco Wireless Security Suite The Complete Picture – Cisco Compatible Extensions <ul><li>CCX </li></ul><ul><li>Built on Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Optimized for Enterprise </li></ul><ul><li>Broad Adoption </li></ul><ul><li>Tested for Interoperability </li></ul>WPA Wi-Fi Protected Access CCX Cisco Compatible eXtensions CCX WPA TKIP Temporal Key Integrity Protocol AES Advanced Encryption Standard 802.1X Authentication TKIP or AES Encryption
    • 8. <ul><li>Static VLAN mapping via SSID, or dynamic VLAN assignment via policy server (RADIUS) </li></ul><ul><li>Up to 16 VLANs </li></ul><ul><li>Each VLAN can e.g. have a different security policy, in-line with the user-profile </li></ul><ul><li>Support for 802.1p/Q VLANs for end-to-end integration </li></ul>VLANs – Segmenting the WLAN SSID: Voice VLAN: 3 SSID: Private VLAN: 1 802.1Q VLAN trunk to wired network SSID: Public VLAN: 2 Supports any CCX client!!
    • 9. Quality of Service <ul><li>Pre-standard implementation: downstream QoS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using EDCF – Enhanced Distributed Coordination Frame </li></ul></ul><ul><li>802.11e will deliver upstream & downstream </li></ul>
    • 10. CISCO SWAN www.cisco.com/go/swan/ © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID
    • 11. Providing Superior Wireless Security, Deployment, Management, and Mobility by INTEGRATING and EXTENDING Wireless Awareness into Key Elements of the Network Infrastructure - Servers, Switches, Routers, APs, and Clients © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Cisco Structured Wireless-Aware Network
    • 12. Cisco SWAN – Three Elements Fast Secure L3 Mobility Centralized Policies High Availability Expanded security options Granular Site Surveys Simplified Deployment/Mgmt Rogue AP Detection and Suppression 3 Cisco switches and routers with wireless-aware Cisco IOS ® Software 1 WLSE 2.7 Aironet 1100/1200/1300 Radios: 802.11b/g/a Wi-Fi client adapters 802.1X AAA Server 2 Cisco Aironet clients Cisco Compatible (CCX) clients
    • 13. Cisco SWAN Minimizes WLAN TCO Cisco warranties and support services; Cisco partnerships like CCX program Optimized deployment of high-performance APs: Assisted Site Survey, “live” RF* readings WPA for access control/authentication and data privacy, integrated WLAN IDS functionality, including rogue AP detection and suppression Support Deployment Security * RF = radio frequency = data transmissions in the air Automated operations of APs (configs, FW, etc.) and RF* (coverage, interference, etc.) Management Future switch/router enhancements for scalability, familiar interface, and fast secure L3 roaming Flexibility
    • 14. Cisco SWAN Components WLSE Cisco Secure ACS Access Points WDS-mode Infrastructure-mode Client Cards Cisco Clients CCX v2
    • 15. Wireless Domain Services <ul><li>Provides centralized software services on behalf of a L2 subnet (WLAN clients and APs) </li></ul><ul><li>Currently supported on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AP 1100/1200 & Bridge/AP 1300 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Catalyst 6500 WLSM – more switches/routers to follow </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Minimizes traffic across LAN/WAN </li></ul><ul><li>WDS AP supports up to 30 infrastructure APs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>60 infrastructure APs in dedicated mode </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Features that leverage WDS </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fast Secure Roaming </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Radio Management/Monitoring - Rogue AP detection / Interference / … </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Local authentication </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 16. An Example – Rogue AP Detection Network Core Distribution Access WDS Rogue AP in coverage areas of trusted APs RM RM RM Rogue AP outside coverage areas of trusted APs
    • 17. An Example – Rogue AP Detection Network Core Distribution Access Rogue AP RM-Agg RM RM RM WDS Rogue AP <ul><li>Radio measurements (RMs) are sent to WDS </li></ul><ul><li>WDS aggregates and condenses RMs </li></ul><ul><li>WDS forwards RM aggregation to WLSE </li></ul><ul><li>WLSE generates reports, alerts, etc. </li></ul>
    • 18. Catalyst 6500 WLSM Wireless LAN Services Module <ul><li>Provide seamless layer 3 mobility across an entire campus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No client hardware or software requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supports low latency roams for Voice </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Simplify Cisco SWAN deployment and configuration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce the number of Wireless Domain Services (WDS) needed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Simplify Deployments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No changes necessary to existing network infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides a single interface per-SSID for the application of security and QoS policy </li></ul></ul>
    • 19. Enterprise Campus Roaming and Aggregation Cisco SWAN enables Fast Secure Scalable Wireless Networking Single Point of Ingress/Egress <ul><li>Fast Secure Roaming </li></ul><ul><li>Simple Configuration </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Stop Forwarding / Stateful Switchover </li></ul><ul><li>Scalability </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated Security Services </li></ul>Seamless Layer 3 Roaming Across Subnets 10.11.12.13 Existing Network CiscoWorks WLSE 2.7 Fast Secure Roaming Tunnels WDS 10.11.12.13
    • 20. Mobility Groups Enable Secure Segmentation Catalyst 6500 Series with WLSM Core Guest Employee Phone WLAN traffic tunneled to mGRE interface PSTN Voice VPN Services Firewall Intrusion Detection Firewall Internet Guests
    • 21. Wireless LAN Solution Engine Key Features <ul><li>Turnkey operational tool for managing Cisco WLANs </li></ul><ul><li>Manages up to 2500 Cisco APs and bridges, plus attached Cisco switches and routers and LEAP servers </li></ul><ul><li>Template-based configuration of APs and bridges </li></ul><ul><li>AP & bridge security misconfiguration detection and alerts </li></ul><ul><li>Proactive fault and performance monitoring of APs, bridges </li></ul><ul><li>Authentication server and attached switch/router monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>AP/Bridge summary and utilization reports </li></ul><ul><li>Current & historical client association tracking reports </li></ul><ul><li>Upper-layer NMS/OSS integration via northbound trap, SYSLOG </li></ul><ul><li>Secure HTML-based UI </li></ul><ul><li>Role-based Access Control </li></ul><ul><li>System & User Defined Device Grouping </li></ul>
    • 22. Managing the WLAN with WLSE Client Association Tracking and Reports Device Grouping LEAP Monitoring Fault/Performance Monitoring of APs & Bridges Template-based configuration of APs & Bridges Switch monitoring
    • 23. CiscoWorks WLSE www.cisco.com/go/wlse Rogue AP Detection Location Manager Assisted Site Survey
    • 24. RM Example: Self Healing Radio Network Lost radio interface
    • 25. CISCO AIRONET www.cisco.com/go/aironet / © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID
    • 26. Cisco Aironet 1200 Series <ul><li>Investment Protection and Future Proof </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supports 802.11a/b/g </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IOS support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>8MB of storage </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Performance & Flexibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Modularity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In-line and regular power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unique security suite (LEAP, PEAP, …) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy and integrated management </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Minimizes Total Cost of Ownership </li></ul><ul><li>Plenum rated chassis </li></ul><ul><li>Physical Security </li></ul>802.11b/g 802.11a Dual-band
    • 27. <ul><li>Scalable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fully functional access point ideal for all enterprise deployments without expensive controllers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>802.11b now – upgradeable to 802.11g </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Affordable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lowest priced upgradeable Cisco Aironet access point protects customer investment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enterprise-class features </li></ul><ul><ul><li>End-to-end intelligent networking extended to WLAN </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Secure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprise-class interoperable security for WLAN </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Easy-to-use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intuitive installation and set up for rapid deployment </li></ul></ul>Cisco Aironet 1100 Series
    • 28. <ul><li>Multi Function </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access Point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workgroup Bridge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>802.11g </li></ul><ul><ul><li>54 Mbps at 2.4 GHz </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Outdoor enclosure – IP56 </li></ul><ul><li>Included in Cisco SWAN solution </li></ul>Aironet 1300 Outdoor AP/Bridge
    • 29. Wireless LAN Client Adapters <ul><li>802.11a/b/g dual band client adapters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>54 Mbps in 2.4 and 5 GHz bands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>802.11b support provides investment protection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CardBus and PCI form factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows XP/2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>802.11a client adapters </li></ul><ul><li>802.11b client adapters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PCMCIA and PCI form factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Broad OS support (MacOS, Linux, …) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CCX-compliant adapters </li></ul>
    • 30. Cisco Compatible Extension Program Key Benefits <ul><li>Innovative Features </li></ul><ul><li>Cisco Wireless Security Suite </li></ul><ul><ul><li>LEAP & pre-standard TKIP </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cisco VLAN </li></ul><ul><li>40+ features in CCX v2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>No cost licensing </li></ul><ul><li>Confidence to Deploy WLAN </li></ul><ul><li>Tested Interoperability </li></ul><ul><li>Leading security solution </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing feature development </li></ul><ul><li>Wide variety of devices & OS’s </li></ul><ul><li>Industry Standards Compliance </li></ul><ul><li>Wi-Fi, WPA & 802.11 </li></ul>Superset to industry standards Accelerate availability of enterprise features
    • 31. Cisco Compatible Extension Program Some of the partners… www.cisco.com/go/ciscocompatible/wireless/ In total 95% of 3 rd party client NICs are covered!
    • 32. Cisco Wireless IP Phone 7920 Supports LEAP – Extending security to voice clients! <ul><li>IEEE 802.11b, Direct Sequence with Dynamic Rate Scaling at 1, 2, 5.5, 11 Mbps </li></ul><ul><li>Pixel-based display </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 lines + soft keys + date/time/RF/battery + status indication </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High performance speaker supports CCM ring tones </li></ul><ul><li>Visual message waiting, key lock, and vibration icon indicators </li></ul><ul><li>Current HW version will go through 3 SW stages </li></ul><ul><li>Automatic IEEE 802.1q (virtual LAN [VLAN]) configuration </li></ul><ul><li>G.711a, G.711u, and G.729a audio-compression coder-decoders (codecs) </li></ul><ul><li>SNMP manager </li></ul><ul><li>DHCP or static configuration option </li></ul><ul><li>Alternate TFTP support </li></ul><ul><li>Range of accessories: cradle, casings, USB cable, … </li></ul><ul><li>Features planned for future software release </li></ul><ul><li>XML services </li></ul><ul><li>Directory services (LDAP) </li></ul><ul><li>Extension mobility </li></ul><ul><li>WPA </li></ul><ul><li>Additional language support </li></ul><ul><li>450 character, two-way </li></ul><ul><li>Paging/messaging </li></ul>
    • 33. Q and A © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID
    • 34. © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID

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