Arquitecturas Orientadas a Servicios (AOS)

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  • Conventional strategy leave you a commodity in a global market. You need to shift your priorities. From Tangibles to Intangibles This takes courage, if you stray from the pack, but remember the pack = commodity Customers have the leverage… Customers today have all the information… think about what consumer reports and things like that did for buying a car how much you paid for the car, what incentives the OEM is giving you… how much you should expect as a profit Global suppliers… driving cost and inefficiencies out of the value chain Customers have the money Speed is the key Having large plants and buildings no longer differentiates, having IP does Responding is what everyone else can do. Only a leader can lead Kai-sen vs. create new rules Fulfill an order you satisfy a customer, anticipate a need and you delight a customer Market share can be gained by giving away your product or service. Loyalty means they’ll stay even if you slip once Globalize is what everyone is doing and is getting better and better at every hour… Personalize… solve my problem, my issue, anticipate my need Monolithic… same thing to everyone… specialize for everyone Need loosely coupled partnerships so as your customer goes, so does your partnerships. This is a nice fairy tale, but the reality is SPEED wins. The FAST eat the slow, NOT the big eat the small. 1980 Fortune 500 less than half are still around. As of 1/20/2003 United Revenue FY01 = $16b (FY00 = $19b) 84,000 employees Stock price last 12 months down 92% Market Cap $81M Jet Blue Revenue FY01 = $320m (FY00 = $104m) ? Employees market cap is $1.858 Billion More background on Jet a GREAT MS customer Fast-growing JetBlue Airways is counting on low fares to keep its ledgers jet black. Based at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, the carrier offers one-class service -- with leather seats and live satellite TV -- to about 20 US cities and Puerto Rico. It has established a second hub at Long Beach Airport outside Los Angeles. JetBlue, which began operations in 2000, has a fleet of more than 30 Airbus A-320s. Industry veteran David Neeleman founded the carrier in 1999 with initial funding of $130 million -- a substantial amount for a start-up airline. The company has acquired LiveTV, which provides DirectTV satellite TV to the airline. Billionaire financier George Soros controls about 24% of JetBlue.  AVG fare = $99
  • Conventional strategy leave you a commodity in a global market. You need to shift your priorities. From Tangibles to Intangibles This takes courage, if you stray from the pack, but remember the pack = commodity Customers have the leverage… Customers today have all the information… think about what consumer reports and things like that did for buying a car how much you paid for the car, what incentives the OEM is giving you… how much you should expect as a profit Global suppliers… driving cost and inefficiencies out of the value chain Customers have the money Speed is the key Having large plants and buildings no longer differentiates, having IP does Responding is what everyone else can do. Only a leader can lead Kai-sen vs. create new rules Fulfill an order you satisfy a customer, anticipate a need and you delight a customer Market share can be gained by giving away your product or service. Loyalty means they’ll stay even if you slip once Globalize is what everyone is doing and is getting better and better at every hour… Personalize… solve my problem, my issue, anticipate my need Monolithic… same thing to everyone… specialize for everyone Need loosely coupled partnerships so as your customer goes, so does your partnerships. This is a nice fairy tale, but the reality is SPEED wins. The FAST eat the slow, NOT the big eat the small. 1980 Fortune 500 less than half are still around. As of 1/20/2003 United Revenue FY01 = $16b (FY00 = $19b) 84,000 employees Stock price last 12 months down 92% Market Cap $81M Jet Blue Revenue FY01 = $320m (FY00 = $104m) ? Employees market cap is $1.858 Billion More background on Jet a GREAT MS customer Fast-growing JetBlue Airways is counting on low fares to keep its ledgers jet black. Based at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, the carrier offers one-class service -- with leather seats and live satellite TV -- to about 20 US cities and Puerto Rico. It has established a second hub at Long Beach Airport outside Los Angeles. JetBlue, which began operations in 2000, has a fleet of more than 30 Airbus A-320s. Industry veteran David Neeleman founded the carrier in 1999 with initial funding of $130 million -- a substantial amount for a start-up airline. The company has acquired LiveTV, which provides DirectTV satellite TV to the airline. Billionaire financier George Soros controls about 24% of JetBlue.  AVG fare = $99
  • This diagram represents the complexity inherent in a mixture of converted and legacy systems developed in the past decade. While individual internal designs may be strong, functionality is not available outside the systems. In other words, project-based development optimizes a project’s deliverables perhaps at the expense of de-optimizing the overall landscape. Strong database integration without a corresponding integrated function design – tight-coupling via the database. The end result is very poor responsiveness to change—the most important point!
  • Conventional strategy leave you a commodity in a global market. You need to shift your priorities. From Tangibles to Intangibles This takes courage, if you stray from the pack, but remember the pack = commodity Customers have the leverage… Customers today have all the information… think about what consumer reports and things like that did for buying a car how much you paid for the car, what incentives the OEM is giving you… how much you should expect as a profit Global suppliers… driving cost and inefficiencies out of the value chain Customers have the money Speed is the key Having large plants and buildings no longer differentiates, having IP does Responding is what everyone else can do. Only a leader can lead Kai-sen vs. create new rules Fulfill an order you satisfy a customer, anticipate a need and you delight a customer Market share can be gained by giving away your product or service. Loyalty means they’ll stay even if you slip once Globalize is what everyone is doing and is getting better and better at every hour… Personalize… solve my problem, my issue, anticipate my need Monolithic… same thing to everyone… specialize for everyone Need loosely coupled partnerships so as your customer goes, so does your partnerships. This is a nice fairy tale, but the reality is SPEED wins. The FAST eat the slow, NOT the big eat the small. 1980 Fortune 500 less than half are still around. As of 1/20/2003 United Revenue FY01 = $16b (FY00 = $19b) 84,000 employees Stock price last 12 months down 92% Market Cap $81M Jet Blue Revenue FY01 = $320m (FY00 = $104m) ? Employees market cap is $1.858 Billion More background on Jet a GREAT MS customer Fast-growing JetBlue Airways is counting on low fares to keep its ledgers jet black. Based at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, the carrier offers one-class service -- with leather seats and live satellite TV -- to about 20 US cities and Puerto Rico. It has established a second hub at Long Beach Airport outside Los Angeles. JetBlue, which began operations in 2000, has a fleet of more than 30 Airbus A-320s. Industry veteran David Neeleman founded the carrier in 1999 with initial funding of $130 million -- a substantial amount for a start-up airline. The company has acquired LiveTV, which provides DirectTV satellite TV to the airline. Billionaire financier George Soros controls about 24% of JetBlue.  AVG fare = $99
  • Before Web services, you and your partners had to agree on programming language, object model, app server, in fact you probably had to agree on the vendor stack in general… sure RMI if you have a J2EE server from BEA… what it’s not from BEA hmmm, better get your developer to call mine. Same w/ CORBA and others. Web services removes the need to run the same stack on both sides… you can disagree about everything in computing as long as you agree on the documents, (Schema) and the business arrangements around those documents… I expect you send an acknowledgement after you ship the widget from your warehouse. Tie this back to the business discussion… Businesses need to be more flexible, IT needs to be more flexible.
  • From a solution architecture perspective, it is valid to look at the service model as an evolutionary advancement on distributed objects Which in turn evolved from objects, et cetera The important point here is that none of these abstraction layers have been discarded Each has their place in a well-architected system Language constructs and language libraries are still how most objects are implemented While objects underlie most service implementations And distributed objects are still the best choice for some highly-performant, tightly-bound systems
  • Service-Oriented analysis is the definition of What services your organization needs And how those services should be factored SOA begins with information architecture, wherein the business entities are defined Entity services are a projection of the information architecture As a best practice, entity services should restrict themselves to CRUD interfaces Plus some support for subscription to change Activity services implement business transactions by manipulating entity services and effectively adding behavior to the business entities Different activity services will add different behaviors to common business entities Creating a new form of polymorphism Process services can be more and less complex, and may call each other’s interfaces In real-world organizations, there may be many layers of process services Such as a mortgage-application process spawning property appraisal and credit scoring processes
  • Once you have decided what services to build, Service-oriented design tenets are used to build them according to best practices and principles For many architects and developers, The process of designing and building consensus around Schemas And contracts Will be new A crucial aspect of service design is how it complies with operational expectations Including using infrastructure services And shared entity definitions Both to get the best return from the investment in shared resources And to make the services as manageable as possible
  • Correctly designed and correctly implemented, An SOA is much more manageable and Much more trustworthy Than a collection of applications that each implement their own approaches to Security Monitoring And exception management To name just a few of the common operational issues Major system vendors Including Microsoft, IBM, and BEA Are cooperating to define standards And build interoperable technologies That will allow organizations to purchase solutions for many of these requirements With the confidence that their systems will both integrate internally, And interoperate with the systems belonging to customers, partners, and suppliers
  • Great – a new wave of software development practice is on the horizon and when it hits our lives will suddenly become pain-free right? Haven’t we heard this before? If we are going to do SOA, what benefit does all this emphasis on loose coupling, services, messages and contracts buy me? The experts seem to agree that it all comes down to the bottom line. What is our greatest expense in building Enterprise LOB applications? There are two areas, development expense and operational expense. Most architects believe that by moving to SOA they can help to lower both by increasing reuse. Increased reuse has been the primary goal of every application development wave of my career. Structured programming promised to increase reuse by emphasizing functional modularity Object oriented programming promised to increase reuse by encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism Client server promised to increase reuse by standardizing data access N-Tier promised to increase reuse by separating user interface from business logic These technologies did succeed in some degree and you could argue that each one is simply a refinement of the previous one. As reuse increased, the expectation increased even more. Now instead of reuse within an application or reuse within a technology/platform stack, the goal with SOA is reuse of business logic regardless of the platform or technology stack. Are we saying that SOA is the only way to create applications? Absolutely not. SOA is just the latest generation of architectural vision but there is still a place for component based n-tier, object oriented and even structured programming.
  • The goal of connecting two remote systems together is not new. Let’s evaluate some of these initiatives/specifications to determine whether or not they meet the criteria for broad adoption - or if they fall short and will be limited to a niche adoption. In the past, early adopters were burned, cut, bruised… betting on technology gimmicks which never fulfilled promises: ease of use, lower costs, faster this faster that Web services are different, for one it’s not a rip and replace model… you LEVERAGE your existing IT assets using Web services EDI EDI has been a very successful approach for connecting tier 1 suppliers with major buyers moving millions of paper-based transactions to electronic transactions. However many of the promised efficiencies of EDI were never fully realized because the applications did not eliminate many of the manual tasks surrounding the documents. In fact, instead of reducing resources, many companies hired new resources to support their EDI efforts. EDI messages were most often printed out at the supplier's side and old human work flow processes took over. EDI solutions are not extensible and therefore not flexible enough for many to many B2B communications and P2P communications. Given the small realized savings along with the significant upfront costs of using Value Added Networks (VANs) associated with an EDI solution, most small/medium and many large size companies never used EDI to connect their businesses. This inability to include the entire value chain or market ecosystem derailed any hope of EDI becoming the ubiquitous connection mechanism across all industries and interaction types. Adoption rate: Niche solution CORBA, RMI and DCOM All three specifications/technologies found some success – especially within a single enterprise – but were never broadly adopted, largely because they failed to meet the four requirements for broad adoption. In each case they: Required the same runtime at each end Didn’t work through firewalls Tightly coupled approach led to performance and scalability issues Object Management Group (OMG) produced the Common Object Request Broker (CORBA) specification to address interoperability between distributed heterogeneous environments. CORBA and its protocol Internet-Inter-ORB (IIOP) have several commercial and several free implementations available. But CORBA has only seen limited deployments. One reason for the lack of adoption of CORBA is its complexity (3.0 is a 560 page specification). Another reason is OMG’s decision to embrace EJB (Enterprise Java Beans) as the middleware rather than staying language neutral. But one of the biggest barriers to volume implementations was CORBA’s failure to embrace Internet standards. Java’s Remote Method Invocation (RMI) and Microsoft’s Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) both approached connecting businesses together through Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). The idea is to send a function or method call with the associated parameters to a remote machine and “invoke” the business logic. This means that the programmer had to have detailed knowledge of the remote applications (all of the method calls, all of the parameters) before writing an application that connected them together. This approach is expensive, time consuming and, most important, fragile. If a partner or customer makes any change to their systems the communication fails. Adoption rate: Niche solutions Potential solutions based on XML Extensible Markup Language (XML) is the universal language of data on the web and is quickly becoming a new data standard within the enterprise. XML allows information workers to share data between diverse systems and platforms. ebXML ebXML (electronic business XML) started as an 18-month cooperative effort ending May 11, 2001 between UN/CEFACT and OASIS that delivered a set of specifications designed to help EDI infrastructure migrate toward XML. Given its focus, ebXML has a strong vision and specifications for B2B transactions, but it is not suited for EAI or P2P projects. This paper will not drill down technically into the specifications. Acknowledging that in most areas, except security, the ebXML specifications have delivered a good enough approach to leverage XML in a B2B scenario. Security issues aside, the main barrier for ebXML messaging is its failure to meet the third requirement: general purpose. The ebXML Messaging Services (ebMS) are not designed for multiple scenarios. This limits the adoption rate in two ways. First, customers will not adopt en masse because they will need to deploy yet another messaging infrastructure to meet their needs for EAI and P2P. Second, the industry platform vendors recognize this limitation and focus their limited resources on the general purpose messaging protocol, XML Web services. Adoption rate: Niche solution XML Web services XML Web services are designed from the start to be a general purpose messaging protocol. Great care was taken to ensure that these specifications meet a wide range of messaging requirements and use case scenarios. They were architected to be modular and loosely coupled with a high amount of technical quality and consistency across all specifications. Customer demand for a common connection platform is driving a broad range of vendors -- led by Microsoft, IBM, BEA, SAP, Seibel, Sun, Iona, Oracle, et. al. -- to invest billions of dollars in building products and solutions based on XML Web services. This universal support from every major vendor of platforms ranging from phones to mainframes is driving the creation of a wide range of products that support the XML Web services stack. This means that virtually every node on the network -- every client, every server, and every service -- can send and receive XML Web services messages. Again, this paper will not drill into the individual specifications, but there are some significant technology advances of XML Web services over other protocols. First and foremost is the richness and broad industry support for WS-Security which details how to digitally sign the payload itself with certificates. Second is the approach to flexibility. Business managers require their B2B connections to be able to change as customer needs and content and business process standards evolve and change. Web services use late binding to enable links between systems which are resolved at run-time. They also use dynamic inspection so availability and functionality of a Web service can be discovered at run-time rather than design time. The use of URLs for object identification removes complexity for the developers. Specifications are a set of rules written in a document. All suffer from the gap between specification and implementation. This gap is caused by two main factors. The first is the specification themselves. Most use MAY and SHOULD to describe how an implementer builds out a solution. The second is that either loose language or other factors cause developers to interpret the wording differently. Both lead to implementations that do not interoperate. XML Web services has the unique value of having an organization that removes the ambiguities within the specification and uses words like MUST and SHALL. Since every major platform vendor is delivering an XML Web services stack, another key deliverable that is critical to the success of XML web services is to ensure that the stack built by vendor A is interoperable with the stack built by vendor B. The organization that promotes and governs this is called WS-I.org. Adoption rate: Ubiquitous solution
  • OK, now we are going to dive a little bit more in the concept and introduce some additional information and technical aspects of the Web Services functionality Click Here we have the computer A running the Application A and the computer B running the application B Let’s imagine the computer A is a HP machine running Windows 2000 Server and belongs to a travel agency. Application A performs many tasks. It s major mission is to keep updated a table with flights information and web site that displays pages HTML to customers of the travel agency. Computer B On the rigth hand side, we have the computer B that runs the application B. Computer B, a beautiful IBM mainframe, belongs to an airline company and the application B maintains a table with the latest flights information
  • The bottom half is existing technology that has support in shipping products from Microsoft, IBM, Iona, BEA, Sun, Oracle, etc…. It exists all the case studies and the value their received were all written using these foundation technologies. We have listened and are hard at work delivering the next set of protocols and technologies. The strategy is to work w/ platform vendor's) and subject matter experts to publish a specification that addresses a need in each bucket. Accelerate broad adoption. Deliver and implementation. For example. Last April we delivered a joint Security white paper with IBM and published the WS-Security specification w/ IBM and Verisign. To accelerate the broad adoption we submitted the specification to a technical committee @ OASIS w/ IBM, Verisign and 9 other vendors including Sun and Oracle and the other security players, Entrust and RSA. In early Dec we release Web Services Enhancement for Microsoft Visual Studio .NET v 1.0 (WSE) which was our implementation of WS-Security, WS-Attachments, WS-Routing and DIME. We plan on following a similar strategy w/ other specifications… Publish w/ subject matter experts and platform vendors, accelerate broad industry adoption, provide implementation. Our current energies are focused on the last remaining big bucket, Reliable Messaging. Stay tuned…
  • Arquitecturas Orientadas a Servicios (AOS)

    1. 1. Arquitecturas Orientadas a Servicios (AOS) Jose Mauricio Alvarez H. Especialista Arquitectura Microsoft, Region Andina [email_address]
    2. 2. Agenda Conferencia <ul><li>Introducción </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios (AOS) </li></ul><ul><li>Beneficios de Negocio </li></ul><ul><li>Mejores practicas en la implementación de AOS </li></ul><ul><li>Tecnologías para implementar AOS </li></ul>
    3. 3. Imperativo de toda Organización CRECER !!! Aumentar Ventas Disminuir Costos
    4. 4. Los negocios están cambiando <ul><li>Tamaño </li></ul><ul><li>Activos Físicos </li></ul><ul><li>Optimizar viejos métodos </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfacción del Cliente </li></ul><ul><li>Monolíticos </li></ul><ul><li>Estructuras Rígidas </li></ul><ul><li>Velocidad, movilidad </li></ul><ul><li>Propiedad Intelectual </li></ul><ul><li>Innovar con nuevas reglas </li></ul><ul><li>Deleitar al Cliente </li></ul><ul><li>Especialización </li></ul><ul><li>Sociedades Flexibles </li></ul>De A
    5. 5. Las Aplicaciones están cambiando <ul><li>Construidas para durar </li></ul><ul><li>Guiadas por el TCO </li></ul><ul><li>Años de atraso </li></ul><ul><li>¿Dónde están los datos? </li></ul><ul><li>Integración: Un costoso esfuerzo posterior </li></ul><ul><li>Construidas para cambiar </li></ul><ul><li>Guiadas por el ROI </li></ul><ul><li>Construcción y puesta en producción en 6 semanas </li></ul><ul><li>Flujo de los Datos </li></ul><ul><li>Integración: Algo tácito </li></ul>De A
    6. 6. <ul><li>“ El mayor diferenciador entre las compañías ahora es su agilidad – su capacidad para crear valor más rápido que sus competidores . Este será el único diferenciador en el futuro, ya que cualquier otra innovación puede ser copiada” </li></ul><ul><li>- Rolf Jester </li></ul><ul><li>Chief Analyst – IT Services Market Asia/Pacific </li></ul><ul><li>Gartner </li></ul>
    7. 7. La realidad del cambio Agilidad es la métrica crítica de TI Macroeconomía Regulaciones Tecnología Globalización Competencia Demanda de Los clientes
    8. 8. Ninguna aplicación es una Isla CRM Business Intelligence Straight through Processing Internet Banking Wireless Aggregation Branch Banking Core Banking Wealth Management Treasury / Forex Trading / Back office Payment Systems and Card Mgmt 3D Secure EAI ATM / POS
    9. 9. Ninguna compañía es una Isla Customers Suppliers Employees Partners Suppliers Suppliers Employees Customers Partners Partners
    10. 10. Generadores de Valor Competencia del negocio Gente Procesos Información Relaciones
    11. 11. Y…. ¿como adopto una arquitectura de TI que me de más agilidad?
    12. 12. Agenda Conferencia <ul><li>Introducción </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios (AOS) </li></ul><ul><li>Beneficios de Negocio </li></ul><ul><li>Mejores practicas en la implementación de AOS </li></ul><ul><li>Tecnologías para implementar AOS </li></ul>
    13. 13. La Arquitectura …y el problema ASB BLT HDL AFT TGI FRY DRW SWG QYD DLY BST WIU ASB ZIS XOI CUI RMO DLY XPS KYF KFC WHR JIA GEX FQA VUH HCO WKD ECP SKD MFP WCP DKE AJT
    14. 14. La arquitectura debe cambiar <ul><li>Altamente Acoplada </li></ul><ul><li>Centrada en costos </li></ul><ul><li>Una plataforma </li></ul><ul><li>Centrada en la aplicación </li></ul><ul><li>Orientada a Objetos </li></ul><ul><li>Conocer cada detalle </li></ul><ul><li>Más Conexiones == más costos </li></ul><ul><li>Poco Acoplada </li></ul><ul><li>Centrada en Valor </li></ul><ul><li>Todas las plataformas </li></ul><ul><li>Data manejable </li></ul><ul><li>Orientada a mensajes </li></ul><ul><li>Abstracción </li></ul><ul><li>Más Conexiones == más valor </li></ul>De A
    15. 15. Reducir Dependencias Reducir Acoplamiento Esquema Acuerdos Lenguaje de Programación Modelo de Objetos Servidor de Aplicaciones Base de Datos Sistema Operativo Usted Su socio Ejemplo de una solución altamente acoplada Ejemplo de una solución suavemente acoplada Base de Datos Lenguaje de Programación Sistema Operativo Servidor de Aplicaciones Modelo de Objetos
    16. 16. La solución Interfaces únicas Interfaces uniformes Interfaces no acopladas Interfaces estándares SOA
    17. 17. La Arquitectura …y la Solución Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios Servicio Servicio Servicio Servicio Servicio Servicio Bus
    18. 18. Servicios: Evolución de la abstracción Bloques de Lenguajes Librerías Modelos de Objetos Objetos distribuidos Modelos de Servicios
    19. 19. AOS en Acción Nicholas Applegate Capital Management antes de AO S Securities System A Securities System B Securities System C Data Data Data
    20. 20. AOS en Action Nicholas Applegate Capital Management d espués de AO S Securities System A Securities System B Securities System C Data Data Data
    21. 21. Dentro de un servicio Servicio Estado Lógica Interfaz De servicio Mensaje
    22. 22. Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios <ul><li>Topología de software, que consiste de servicios y consumidores de servicios en una relación débilmente acoplada. (Gartner) </li></ul><ul><li>Provee Servicios a consumidores vía interfaces estándares, publicadas y descubridles </li></ul><ul><li>Provee un modelo para integración </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dentro de la organización </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A través de los limites organizacionales </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Las capacidades del Negocio y los Procesos del negocio, serán modelados como servicios </li></ul><ul><li>Sobre el camino de la organización ágil </li></ul>
    23. 23. Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios <ul><li>Una aproximación para construir sistemas usando servicios los cuales se adhieren a 4 pilares: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Los limites son explícitos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Los servicios son Autónomos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Los servicios comparten esquemas y contratos, no clases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>La compatibilidad de los servicios, se determina basados en las política </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Aspectos de Análisis Orientado a Servicios <ul><li>Identificación de entidades </li></ul><ul><li>Construcción de Entidades </li></ul><ul><li>Identificación de Servicios </li></ul><ul><li>Construcción de Servicios </li></ul><ul><li>Especificación de Procesos </li></ul><ul><li>Identificación de puntos de contacto </li></ul><ul><li>Mapeo de roles </li></ul><ul><li>SLA’s </li></ul><ul><li>… </li></ul>Servicios de Entidad Servicios de Proceso Servicios de Infraestructura Clientes y Agentes Arquitectura de Tecnología Arquitectura de información Servicios de Actividad
    25. 25. Aspectos de Diseño Orientado a Servicios <ul><li>Definición de Esquemas </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Mensajes </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Contratos </li></ul><ul><li>Manejo de Mensajes </li></ul><ul><li>Manejo de Procesos </li></ul><ul><li>Modelo de Transacciones </li></ul><ul><li>Manejo de Excepciones </li></ul><ul><li>… </li></ul>Contracts Servicio Servicio Proceso Documento A Documento C-1 Documento C-2 Documento B Cualquiera C-1 o C-2 Proceso
    26. 26. Aspectos de Operación de Servicios <ul><li>Seguridad </li></ul><ul><li>Control de Acceso </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoreo </li></ul><ul><li>Administración </li></ul><ul><li>Control de QoS y SLA’s </li></ul><ul><li>Versiones </li></ul><ul><li>Escalabilidad </li></ul><ul><li>Disponibilidad </li></ul><ul><li>Manejo de Caché </li></ul>Servicio Servicio Infraestructura de Procesamiento de Mensajes Infraestructura de Procesamiento de Mensajes Serialización Cifrado Firma Deserialización Autenticación Autorización Auditoría Bitácora Mensajería Confiable
    27. 27. Agenda Conferencia <ul><li>Introducción </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios (AOS) </li></ul><ul><li>Beneficios de Negocio </li></ul><ul><li>Mejores practicas en la implementación de AOS </li></ul><ul><li>Tecnologías para implementar AOS </li></ul>
    28. 28. Beneficios de AOS <ul><li>“ promueve reutilización dentro de la Organización, decrementando Time To Market y TCO.” </li></ul><ul><li>“… intención primaria es la reutilización de software de negocios en nuevos contextos de negocio.” </li></ul><ul><li>AOS trae los siguientes beneficios: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Desarrollo incremental de software de negocio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rehúso de componentes de negocio en múltiples experiencias de negocio </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ reutilización de las capacidades existentes.” </li></ul>… decrementar Time To Market y TCO Reutilización Incrementar la agilidad de negocio Low-cost… Disminuir costos
    29. 29. AOS: Beneficios de Negocio <ul><li>Nicholas Gall, MetaGroup </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ We believe service-oriented architecture is going to be a trend, and in fact a disruptive trend.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>MetaGroup </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Computation Virtualization enables Business Virtualization (Meta) </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Agenda Conferencia <ul><li>Introducción </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios (AOS) </li></ul><ul><li>Beneficios de Negocio </li></ul><ul><li>Mejores practicas en la implementación de AOS </li></ul><ul><li>Tecnologías para implementar AOS </li></ul>
    31. 31. Mejores Practicas en la Implementación de AOS <ul><li>Alinear Servicios con los procesos de negocio </li></ul><ul><li>Involucre al negocio, mediante workshops </li></ul><ul><li>Posicione servicios, usando modelos verticales y horizontales </li></ul><ul><li>Comience con Servicios no Servicios Web </li></ul><ul><li>Utilice un interfase común, para unificar aplicaciones duplicadas </li></ul><ul><li>Tener el control de la arquitectura </li></ul><ul><li>Exponer funcionalidad de aplicaciones core como servicios </li></ul><ul><li>Tener una Arquitectura de resolución </li></ul><ul><li>Tener una arquitectura para la invocación de servicios </li></ul>
    32. 32. Agenda Conferencia <ul><li>Introducción </li></ul><ul><li>Definición de Arquitectura Orientada a Servicios (AOS) </li></ul><ul><li>Beneficios de Negocio </li></ul><ul><li>Mejores practicas en la implementación de AOS </li></ul><ul><li>Tecnologías para implementar AOS </li></ul>
    33. 33. Aproximaciones a SOA <ul><li>B2B </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EDI </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CORBA, ebXML </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketplaces </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EAI </li></ul><ul><ul><li>APPC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proprietary APIs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adapters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RMI, DCOM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. WEB Services Browser IIS Aplicaciones HTTP Request HTML IIS Aplicaciones SOAP Request XML Dispositivos Win Apps WEB Apps WEB Page WEB Service
    35. 35. Qué es un Web Service? Lógica de aplicación encapsulada como un componente en la Web para ser usada por otros programas SOAP <ul><li>Formatos para enviar y recibir datos usando XML </li></ul>WSDL Contract Language <ul><li>Definir formatos y ordenamientos de los mensajes </li></ul>UDDI Involucra : <ul><li>Poder preguntar por descripciones de los WS que ofrece un sitio </li></ul><ul><li>Todo lo anterior posible usando protocolos de internet abiertos </li></ul>XML, HTTP, HTTPS Protocol o s Internet Abiertos Web Service
    36. 36. ¿Cómo trabaja un XML Web Service? Web Service Procesos de Negocio Control de Flujo MS BizTalk Formatea SOAP XML Messages (Schemas) Celda en MS Excel desde un PC Podría ser el resultado de una constelación de Aplicaciones previas, cada una diseñada en un computador distinto Podría ser un PLC, un Pocket PC, un Celular, un Xbox, o cualquier dispositivo inteligente Aplicación A (Lógica de Negocios) Computador A Front-End / Wrapper Input Deliverable ID Description Aplicación B (Lógica de Negocios) FIREWALL Computador B
    37. 38. WSA Asynchronous Messaging Reliable Messaging Security Description Transactions Discovery Extensión Seguro, confiable, Transaccional SOAP (Modelo lógico de mensajes) XML Bases
    38. 39. Preguntas?

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