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From Knowledge Economy to Human Progress- presentation by Luanne Zurlo, President and Founder of World Fund
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From Knowledge Economy to Human Progress- presentation by Luanne Zurlo, President and Founder of World Fund

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From Knowledge Economy to Human Progress- presentation by Luanne Zurlo, President and Founder of World Fund featured at the 2nd International Conference: Brazil: A pathway into the future from the …

From Knowledge Economy to Human Progress- presentation by Luanne Zurlo, President and Founder of World Fund featured at the 2nd International Conference: Brazil: A pathway into the future from the Emerging Markets Institute at Cornell University's Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management and Better Brazil

Published in: Education

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  • 1. 2012 Brazil ConferenceJohnson Cornell University Emerging Markets InstituteWORLDFUND ▪ 915 Broadway, Suite 1108 New York, NY 10010 ▪ Ph. 212 228 5353 ▪ www.worldfund.org
  • 2. Years of Schooling for AdultsSource: Barro and Lee, Educational Attainment Dataset
  • 3. Educational Attainment of Adults (1960) (2000) (2010)% % % No Schooling+Primary Secondary Tertiary Source: Barro and Lee, Educational Attainment Dataset
  • 4. Annual expenditure per student, 2008US$ (‘000’s)Source: OEDC Data Indicators, 2008
  • 5. Brazil and Latin America lag behind the rest of the world ineducation quality, even relative to GDP per capita
  • 6. 50% of Brazilian 15-year-olds scored at thelowest level, meaning they are functionallyilliterate in today’s information-age economy. OECD PISA, 2009
  • 7. 70% of Brazil’s high school students are notminimally competent in math. Over half cannotgive any scientific explanation for familiarphenomenon. math science OECD PISA, 2009
  • 8.  Only a small fraction of Brazilian students performed at the highest level in the PISA test for reading and for science and math. 0% of students in Brazil performed at the highest level in science. (Pisa 2009 Results, page 225) reading math science OECD PISA, 2009
  • 9. Test Scores and GDP Growth Countries with students that had high test scores in 1960 experienced greater GDP growth over the subsequent 40 yearsSource: Eric A. Hanushek and Ludger Woessman, Journal of Economic Literature, 2008
  • 10. Teachers make the difference100th percentile 90th percentile If two students with equal ability are High-performing assigned to two Two students teacher teachers, with equal students with ability better teachers can get 1 to 1.5 50th percentile grade levels ahead per year. Low-performing 37th percentile teacher 0 percentile 8 years old 11 years old Source: Sanders & Rivers, Cumulative and Residual Effects on Future Student Academic Achievement, 1996. Study conducted in Tennessee, USA.
  • 11. Teacher Impact on Students’ Lives “Replacing a teacher whose value-added is in the bottom 5% with an average teacher would increase students’ lifetime income by more than US$250K for the average classroom in our sample.” Effects of Teacher Value-Added Effects of Teacher Value-Added on College Attendance on Earnings at Age 28Source: Chetty, Ray. et all. “The Long Term Impacts of Teachers: Teacher Value-Added and Studennt Outcomes in Adulthood.”National Bureau of Economic Research, 2011.
  • 12. Percentage of Jobs Needing a College Degree 28% 37% 42% 45% *PROJECTED Source: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, June 2010