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Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
Daughters of charity new orleans
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Daughters of charity new orleans

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  • 1. John D. Patton H624 - Market Study December 11, 2010
  • 2. Primary Care and Healthcare Reform <ul><li>“ I don’t know of any (congressional member) who disputes the centrality of primary care and coordinated care and, therefore, the medical home...There are lots of different ways to think about how to fund it, lots of different ways to think about payment structure and lots of different ways to think about how to coordinate care, but the concepts of nurturing primary care and encouraging coordinated care are definitely front and center.” </li></ul><ul><li>Len Nichols, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li>New America Foundation </li></ul>
  • 3. Background <ul><li>FQHC </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Community-based and patient-directed organizations that serve populations with limited access to healthcare.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Non-profit private or public entities that serve designated medically underserved populations/areas or special medically underserved populations comprised of migrant and seasonal farmworkers, the homeless or residents of public housing.” </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. Background <ul><li>Established in New Orleans in late 1800’s. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hotel Dieu Hospital </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1992 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Closed hospital </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transitioned efforts toward community health </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. Mission Vision Values <ul><li>Mission </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rooted in the loving ministry of Jesus as healer, we commit ourselves to serving all persons with special attention to those who are poor and vulnerable. Our Catholic health ministry is dedicated to spiritually centered, holistic care, which sustains and improves the health of individuals and communities. We are advocates for a compassionate and just society through our actions and our words. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Vision </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We envision a strong, vibrant Catholic health ministry in the United States which will lead to the transformation of healthcare. We will ensure service that is committed to health and well-being for our communities and that responds to the needs of individuals throughout the life cycle. We will expand the role of laity, in both leadership and sponsorship, to ensure a Catholic health ministry of the future. </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Mission Vision Values <ul><li>Values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are called to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Service of the Poor — generosity of spirit, especially for persons most in need </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reverence — respect and compassion for the dignity and diversity of life </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Integrity — inspiring trust through personal leadership </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wisdom — integrating excellence and stewardship </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creativity — courageous innovation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dedication — affirming the hope and joy of our ministry </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 7. Strengths Volume Trends Financial Data (Dollars in Millions) 2009 2008 Acute Care Admissions 636,687 638,209 Total Admissions 687,203 687,794 Case Mix Index 1.48 1.48 Equivalent Discharges 1,260,145 1,246,940 Acute Average Length of Stay 4.48 4.59 Emergency Room Visits 2,339,373 2,281,981 Surgical Visits 537,235 540,864 2009 2008 Care of poor $868 $783 Total unrestricted cash and investments $5688 $6259 Total Assets $16511 $17327 Total Operating Revenue $14277 $13408 Income from recurring operations $407 $512 Net (loss) income $(710) $356 Capital Spending $768 $1057 Income from operations $371 $483
  • 8. Strengths <ul><li>FQHC Status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Grant supported </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community Focus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reimbursement (cost-based, per visit) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Medical Home Status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Health Care Reform </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased FFS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Enhanced support for preventive care </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Payment protections and improvements (Medicare=Medicaid) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coverage and service expansion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Workforce development </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 9. Weaknesses <ul><li>No local hospital affiliation/partnership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resource sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information technology (potential expanded medical history access) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No strong focus or concentration on behavioral or mental health services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Health Care Reform </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Behavioral Health Integration </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Sources of Competitive Advantage <ul><li>Partners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ascension Health </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nation’s largest Catholic and nonprofit health system (top 5 overall) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fortune 500 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Unrestricted investments doubled to $5.6 billion in 2006 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Operating revenue doubled to $11.4 billion in 2006 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>United Health Group </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Awarded DOCS $3.3 million grant for new facility </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Catholic Health Association </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. Threat Assessment <ul><li>Broader Environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Future of healthcare </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Health Care Reform </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New Entries </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hospitals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Market Environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New Orleans’ HC market </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. New Orleans Hospitals
  • 13. New Orleans Health Centers
  • 14. Competitors <ul><li>St. Thomas Community Health Center </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FQHC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Established in 1987 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“Home-grown” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnerships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CDC-supported Louisiana Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Specialty consultations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Safety-net providers </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 15. Strategic Group Analysis <ul><li>Similar markets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New Orleans hospitals </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Similar competitors in other states </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FQHCs in Indianapolis/Marion County </li></ul></ul>
  • 16. Future Prospects and Opportunities <ul><li>Sustainability of competitive advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnerships (Ascension, United Health Group) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Michael Griffin, CEO </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IT infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Available Strategic Options </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hospital “feeder” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expanding into other areas </li></ul></ul>
  • 17. Hospital “Feeder” Tulane ` Memorial
  • 18. Expanding DOC Ochsner
  • 19. Enhancing Competitive Advantage <ul><li>School-based Health Center (SBHC) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Currently less than 6 in area </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Same benefits, start-up funds, reimbursement, etc., as FQHC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost-effective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improved access (lower no-shows) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Research and Information Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Newcastle Model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TeleHealth </li></ul></ul>
  • 20. <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
  • 21. <ul><li>References </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Daughters of Charity Services of New Orleans website. Retrieved November 23, 2010, from www.dcsno.org . </li></ul><ul><li>Evans, Melanie. (2007). Ascending in healthcare. Modern Healthcare. Retrieved December 1, 2010 from http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20070514/REG/70511014 </li></ul><ul><li>Nystrom, Robert J, Prata, Adriana. (2008). Planning and Sustaining a School-based health center: cost and revenue findings from Oregon. Public Health Reports. November-December, 2008, Volume 123. </li></ul><ul><li>Robeznieks, Andis. (2010). Hospitals consider medical homes’ costs, benefits. Modern Healthcare. Retrieved December 1, 2010, from http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20101129/NEWS/311299996/1153 </li></ul><ul><li>Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Long A, Bailit, M. Health Reform and the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Policy Provisions and Expectations of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Seattle, WA: Qualis Health and Bailit Health Purchasing, October 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website. The Health Center Program: What is a Health Center. Retrieved November 30, 2010, from http:// bphc.hrsa.gov /about/ </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>

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