Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Playing@learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Playing@learning

460

Published on

Given at a session on Playful Learning at the 2010 Children and Media Conference in Sheffield.

Given at a session on Playful Learning at the 2010 Children and Media Conference in Sheffield.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
460
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Intro myself - Managing the BBC’s 5-19, formal learning, output, which is nowadays all online. worked in BBC Learning for 10 years

    Jumped-up web production person, don’t like talking to strangers, so I’m kind of playing at presenting too.

    Which is kind of ok because as we all know playing is a big part of how people learn...
  • xkcd is a favourite comic of mine, and this strip exemplifies the power of play to help people learn.

    If you didnt already know the chemical symbol for tin is SN before you saw this strip, you do now. And that instant of recognition,
    the little burst of pleasure when the penny drops, will have helped to make that new knowledge deep and lasting.

  • I’m not really going to talk about online games, other than to say that the BBC does make them - quite a few of them -
    and BBC Learning does sometimes invest in them and leverage them for learning. For example the Blast teen creativity site
    is running an online game design competition around these games, with the winners getting work experience at the agency
    that’s making a Dr Who game.

    maybe mention Games Grid?
  • But games like this are v expensive, and so far their application to formal, curriculum learning are not that obvious.
    So what might a playful approach to curriculum learning look like?

    Well, we do make games - lots of ‘em - in BBC Learning, many of them linked to Bitesize. We make them simple and cheap, and we embed quizzes.
    They work really well: theyre only games with quizzes, but they help to merge the boundaries between learning and playing.
  • Here’s Questionnaut from KS2 and KS3 Bitesize. It’s a simple first person puzzle game with successful completion of quizzes
    unlocking the next level ..
  • This is Mia Cadaver from KS3 and KS4 Bitesize - a multiplayer quiz set in a graveyard, where you play either against
    everyone who’s online or just against a bunch of friends or classmates.

    But I’m not going to show you any more games - because games is not what I really want to talk about..
  • A teeny bit of theory here.

    Brian Sutton-Smith, sometimes known as The Godfather of Play Theory, analyses play as a threshold activity which
    is also a type of rhetoric - an acting out of meaning - and above all is something which works with ambiguity,
    with double meanings, something which plays with meaning.
  • But how might you bring this approach to the deadly serious business of high-stakes terminal tests? That’s what we’ve
    been trying to do at Bitesize - where we suspect that even revision can be playful..

    Ironically, one reason for the success of Bitesize is precisely that it doesn’t take exams too seriously. Let me explain with
    some examples...
  • This is from GCSE Bitesize English Literature. It’s about a Sylvia Plath short story called Superman and Paula Brown’s New Snowsuit.
  • And this is an episode of Melvin and Steven from KS2 Bitesize - a series of short animations supporting topics in
    KS2 English.
  • This is a wry animation with quizzes for GCSE Modern World History.


  • Finally, one of around 70 short movies supporting GCSE Geography topics, which uses a bricollage of BBC archive material
    to deliver playful learning.

    The significant thing about all these examples is that even though they are deeply satirical - they deliver the knowledge the
    students need. In fact, they deliver it all the more effectively because of the irony, the satire. Because they make them think..
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • The twin assumptions behind this approach are that

    a) high-stakes tests may be a fact of life at school - but should not be mistaken for education. And
    b) learning can be playful, ironic and fun, even when done in the shadow of the exam
  • I leave you with Brian Sutton-Smith, who analyses play in terms of rhetoric - 7 different kinds of rhetoric to be precise.
    The last and most important of the 7 is the rhetoric of the frivolous.

    This is the rhetoric of tricksters, jesters and fools, “who enact playful protest against the orders of the ordained world.”
  • Transcript

    • 1. Playing@learning john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 2. john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 3. john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 4. but what about the classroom ? john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 5. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/game/questionaut/index.shtml john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 6. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/games/mia/index.shtml john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 7. Brian Sutton-Smith* • Play as liminal – occupying the threshold between one thing (reality, seriousness) and another (unreality, foolishness) • Play as rhetoric - taking a stance, adopting a different persona, acting out a new role • Play as ambiguity – of meaning, of reference, of intent. How serious is this? * The Ambiguity of Play, 1997 john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 8. But a ludic approach to end-of-stage exams ..? john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 9. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/prosesuperman/supermanplotact.shtml john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 10. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesize/english/reading/poetry/watch.shtml john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 11. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/ir2/developmentsact.shtml john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 12. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/geography/riverswater/river_landforms_video.shtml john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 13. john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 14. A playful approach to high-stakes exams might be .. ambiguous, intertextual, knowing, ironic, funny, absurd, subversive, frivolous .. and STILL help you get a good grade. john.millner@bbc.co.uk
    • 15. Brian Sutton-Smith* The rhetoric of play as frivolous .. inverts the classic "work ethic" view of play, against which all the other rhetorics exist as rhetorics of rebuttal. Frivolity as used here is not just the puritanic negative, it is also a term [for the] historical trickster figures and fools, who were once the central and carnivalesque persons who enacted playful protest against the orders of the ordained world. * The Ambiguity of Play, 1997 john.millner@bbc.co.uk

    ×