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John 1   Guide To Injury Management 2011.Ppt Updated
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John 1 Guide To Injury Management 2011.Ppt Updated

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Transcript

  • 1. Guide to Injury Management Process and Responsibilities for Supervisors and Managers John Figredo OHS Coordinator Transpacific Industries Group
  • 2. Introduction
    • Purpose of this training is to ensure all managers and supervisors are aware of TPI’s processes for the management of injured employees including:
      • Timely reporting and investigation of incidents
      • Medical assessment of injured employees
      • The Early Intervention Program (EIP)
      • Workers’ Compensation Claims (Safety, Rehabilitation & Compensation Act, 1988)
  • 3. You as a supervisor are responsible for all of your people – including the injured ones! (The OHS Co-ordinator is there to assist you in returning your injured employees to pre-injury duties but is not responsible for the supervision or management of them).
  • 4. The Importance of Effective Injury Management
    • In 2008 – TPI became ‘self-insured’ under the federal Safety, Rehabilitation & Compensation Act, 1988 (Comcare Scheme)
    • TPI is responsible for the total cost (visible cost) of all work-related injuries:
      • Medical expenses
      • Incapacity payments
      • Rehabilitation costs
  • 5. Hidden Costs of Injuries
    • Loss of esteem of injured employee
    • Pressure on family unit
    • Lost production time
    • Need for other employees to cover shift/ casual labour
    • Cost of retraining
    • Time spent in administration related to injured employee
    • Loss of morale in business unit
    • It is widely estimated that the hidden costs of an injury are 5 times greater than the visible costs!
  • 6. Commission Indicators
    • PREVENTION
    • Incidence rate of claims with one week lost time
    • Number of death claims
    • Frequency rate with one day lost time
    • CLAIMS
    • Days taken to process new claims (injury and disease)
    • Percentage of new claims processed
    • Days taken to process reconsiderations
    • REHABILITATION
    • Percentage of claims with RTW plans
    • Incidence rate of claims with 6 weeks (30 days) lost time
    • Incidence rate of claims with 12 weeks (60 days) lost time
  • 7. COMCARE FOCUS ON LOST TIME INJURIES IN 4 OUT OF 9 COMMISSION INDICATORS (Frequency & Duration)
  • 8. Lost Time Injury = Where the injured employee is not capable of returning to their normal job at their next shift, the employee shall ensure that a correctly completed medical certificate is provided to their Supervisor and TIG OHS F 1340 1 Claim for Workers Compensation completed.
  • 9. You as the supervisor/manager of an employee are in the best position to get the best outcome for the injured employee and the business – a quick return to work. Your attitude to early reporting, medical assessment and the subsequent management of an employee in the workplace can mean the difference between a short-lived injury and one which becomes costly to the organisation! LEAD FROM THE FRONT
  • 10. FACT
    • An employee who is difficult to manage BEFORE an injury is likely to become more difficult to manage AFTER an injury! (OHS Coordinators don’t have magic wands!)
    • Some of our highest costing or most contentious claims arise from employees who have ‘concerned’ management prior to injury.
    • Normal industrial processes and management principles should apply even to injured personnel.
  • 11. Our Aim
    • To encourage timely reporting of all workplace injuries and treat the injury seriously;
    • To facilitate access to appropriate medical treatment;
    • To maintain our employees in the workplace by offering suitable duties;
    • To return our employees to pre-injury duties as quickly as possible;
    • To reduce the visible and hidden costs of workplace injuries within TPI;
    • To prevent Lost Time Injuries where possible.
  • 12. Incident Reporting
    • If you sustain an injury arising out of, or in the course of your employment with TPI, you must immediately report it to your supervisor/manager.
    • Reporting occurs via Incident Non Conformance Report Form and the Vault
  • 13. Assessment of Injury
    • As soon as injury occurs or is reported, an immediate assessment of injury should occur :
      • Contain the area if necessary – is it safe?
      • Does the employee require First Aid?
      • Can the injury be effectively treated on-site by First Aid Officer?
      • Does the employee require/request assessment by a doctor?
      • Does the employee require hospitalisation?
  • 14. Facility Nominated Doctor
    • Where employee requires/requests a medical assessment of injury, appointment should be made with the local TPI approved medical practitioner
    • This is not a ‘company doctor’ and should not be referred to as such;
  • 15. Facility Nominated Doctor
    • Appointment can be made by supervisor/manager or delegate thereof;
    • Supervisor should accompany employee to medical facility;
    • Employee should return to TPI/TIS with appropriate medical certificate after assessment;
    • Outcome of assessment to be communicated immediately to OHS Coordinator.
  • 16. Medical Treatment
    • Employee cannot be compelled to attend a TPI approved medical practitioner
    • May choose to seek treatment from own GP – if this occurs, OHS Coordinator must be notified immediately;
    • In the absence of OHS Coordinator, the supervisor/manager must contact the treating doctor by phone/fax or attend in person and assure him/her TPI is in a position to provide alternative suitable duties.
  • 17. Early Intervention Program or Claim?
    • When employee returns from doctor, supervisor should:
      • review medical certificate, noting restrictions;
      • arrange for employee to see OHS Coordinator as soon as possible.
    • Certificate will indicate whether it is appropriate to offer access to EIP or whether a claim needs to be lodged.
  • 18. Early Intervention Program (EIP)
    • TPI in-house initiative;
    • Designed to ensure employees who suffer a genuine, minor, work-related injury are afforded immediate medical care at no cost and can remain in the workplace with/without restrictions;
    • Completely voluntary – employee cannot be compelled to choose EIP.
  • 19. Early Intervention Program (EIP)
    • EIP applies only in the following circumstances:
    • An employee sustains a work-related injury;
    • There has been no lost time as a result of the injury;
    • Medical costs are not likely to exceed nominated amount of $500
    • An employee completes an Incident Report with supervisor within 24 hours as per company procedure.
  • 20. Early Intervention Program (EIP)
    • EIP may apply at manager’s discretion:
    • Where a work-related injury is reported outside 24 hour period and there is genuine reason for this;
    • Where a supervisor/manager observes an employee to be having difficulty in the workplace due to injury/illness;
    • Where a critical, work-related incident occurs resulting in trauma to employee.
  • 21. Early Intervention Program (EIP)
    • Participation is voluntary;
    • Does not preclude the employee from lodging a claim at any time;
    • Does not imply liability upon TPI should claim be lodged;
    • TPI reserves right to withdraw program at any time and ask that a claim be lodged.
  • 22. Early Intervention Program (EIP)
    • If deemed appropriate, program must be explained to employee;
    • Appropriate paperwork must be completed;
    • Where certificate is issued with restrictions, Injury Management Plan developed by OHS Coordinator and signed by supervisor;
    • All certificates and accounts for treatment to be passed to OHS Coordinator immediately.
  • 23. Compensation Claims
    • Compensation claim should be lodged:
      • Where injury results in ‘lost time’;
      • Where injury involves restriction on hours to be worked;
      • Where there is a delay in reporting or doubt as to mechanism of injury;
      • Medical costs exceed nominated amount ($500)
      • Employee requests that such a claim be lodged.
  • 24. Compensation Claims
    • OHS Coordinator /Manager will be required to assist employee to lodge the claim;
    • Supervisor/manager will be required to:
      • actively participate in any rehabilitation program
      • be available for Case Conferences as necessary
      • ensure that suitable duties and appropriate supervision are available for employee.
  • 25. The OHS Coordinator will work with supervisor/Manager to help identify potential suitable duties, but the ultimate provision of duties and supervision of injured employees remains the responsibility of the supervisor/manager.
  • 26. Supervisor/Manager Responsibilities
    • To intervene as soon as possible where a work-related injury/illness is reported;
    • To ensure the injured employee receives appropriate first aid or medical treatment;
    • To accompany the employee to a medical assessment;
    • To complete an Incident Notification and (where required) Investigation Form with the employee as per Company protocol;
    • To enter the incident into the vault ( Tranpacific's new Incident Management System)
  • 27. Supervisor/Manager Responsibilities
    • To involve the OHS Coordinator in the process as soon as possible where necessary;
    • To provide a range of suitable duties and appropriate supervision for employee consistent with restrictions;
    • To participate actively in any vocational rehabilitation program;
    • To maintain contact with the injured employee (weekly phone-call minimum).
  • 28. Employee Responsibilities
    • Promptly reporting immediately to their employer the details of any accident, injury or disease that might be related to their work
    • To participate in any investigation where required to identify cause of injury and to minimise risk of reoccurrence;
    • To co-operate fully with initiatives and directives aimed at job maintenance or; OHS Coordinator
    • To attend medical reviews and supply consecutive medical certificates in a timely manner;
    • To maintain contact with workplace management.
  • 29. OHS Coordinators Responsibilities
    • To make contact with the injured employee as soon as notified;
    • To provide necessary information regarding suitable duties to medical practitioner;
    • To accompany employee to medical assessment if required;
    • To assist employee to access EIP or lodge a compensation claim as appropriate;
    • To ensure an Injury Management Plan is implemented and monitored where EIP is appropriate;
    • To ensure any statutory rehabilitation activity is initiated in a timely manner and monitored closely;
    • To maintain communication with the employee, medical practitioner and rehabilitation provider throughout the process to ensure a timely return to pre-injury duties.
  • 30. Important Points to Note
    • Your influence as a supervisor/manager can have a significant impact (positive or negative) on how seriously injury management is taken in your workplace.
    • You are a key player in the process and the steps you take in the wake of a workplace injury will have a direct impact on the cost and duration of that injury.
    • LEAD FROM THE FRONT
  • 31. In Summary
    • Encourage early reporting of all workplace injuries;
    • Be sympathetic;
    • Ensure medical treatment is offered, at TPI’s approved medical practitioners
    • Ensure OHS Coordinator is notified;
    • Stay in touch with employee – take an interest;
    • Be supportive and help locate suitable duties;
    • Actively participate in all rehabilitation initiatives.
  • 32. Any Other Questions?

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