John P Corrigan: portfolio, circa 2010
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John P Corrigan: portfolio, circa 2010

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A boutique styled independent design studio encouraging intelligent and innovative design solutions. ...

A boutique styled independent design studio encouraging intelligent and innovative design solutions.

NovaClutch’s experience ranges in scope from website graphics, book and magazine design, event planning, package design, identity and brand development, signage systems, promotional materials for artist exhibitions, and art direction. I understand what goes into bringing typography, advertising, marketing and design concepts to the public. I enjoy the idea that a design studio is a transparent interwoven blend of work, play, and a professional space. A flexible and diverse working environment specializing in: Graphic Design, Publication and Book Design, Curatorial + Museum Services, Research, Writing, Typography, Retail Applications, Signage, Fine Art and illustration, and Education.

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John P Corrigan: portfolio, circa 2010 John P Corrigan: portfolio, circa 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • NOVA- CLUTCH// TYPO- GRAPHIC ANNEX
  • JOHN PAGe CORRIGAN 400 GROVELAND AVE. NO. 708 MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA 55403 612.813.1333 jpagecorrigan@hotmail.com PORTFOLIO WORK SAMPLES CASE STUDY FACSIMILE
  • ©2010 JOHN P. CORRIGAN NOVACLUTCH // TYPOGRAPHIC ANNEX All rights reserved. Published by Central Air :: Nomadic Art Space Type + Design: John P. Corrigan Online: http://jpagecorrigan.wordpress.com
  • | 5 EDUCATION BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art + Design, Minnesota, 1994; studio concentration in graphic design, typography and illustration. MFA in Graphic Design, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, 2008. CONTINUING EDUCATION Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, Maine. Woodcarving taught by Bob Trotman, summer 1995. The Loft Literary Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Poetry Journal, taught by Grace Willow Morgan, spring 1999. INTERNSHIP September 2007 – August 2008, paid research internship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C. Exhibitions Department, Fall 2007. Research assistant to historian Danny Greene. I developed and edited potential content for upcoming exhibition on Nazi Propaganda and anti-Semitism. Collections Department, Spring 2008. Research assistant to art and acquisitions historian and curator Suzy Snyder. I was responsible for registering recent donations to the museum, providing detailed content listings and Deeds of Gift registration. Exhibitions Department, Summer 2008. Research assistant to historian Ann Millin. Created and maintained image database for copyright clearance and permissions for online exhibition materials of Nazi propaganda. RESEARCH MFA Thesis Development Graphic Expression of Internment refers to the specific representation of shared graphic art and artifacts of the Holocaust. The graphic nature of the three photo albums/scrapbooks addresses the language of design. The design process includes editorial decisions made in the process of their articulated planning and creation. By definition, graphic design is an art or profession of visual communication that skillfully combines images, words, and ideas to convey information to an audience. Graphic design can also be a form of personal expression that reflects the attitudes of a community for which the work is intended. This collection looks at the expressive nature of design in its ability to structure content, thereby creating a more inclusive narrative. The subject matter of the research is Holocaust Art, Displaced Persons (DP) Camps, the Organization for Rehabilitation and Training (ORT), and the Art and Artifacts collections of the USHMM. Through each of the three albums, I identify major themes common to Holocaust studies. Themes such as documentation, preservation, dedication, and memorial place each album in the grand context of Holocaust studies. CURRICULUM VITAE
  • | 7 TEACHING In the past ten years I have been frequently asked to present my portfolio as an entry point for young artists and design students. While this has predominantly taken the form of question- and-answer sessions, these have also become opportunities for me to offer opinions, guidance, and informal critique of students’ work. On separate occasions I have presented seminars to introduce print making and book art techniques, in association with developing a working portfolio. “eMAC Class: DIY Printmaking Workshop.” Maryland Institute College of Art with instructor Jenna Frye, November 2006. “Mentor/Sounding Board for Adam Flannigan.” Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Senior Thesis– Design, invited by instructor Pam Arnold. Spring 2002. “Interim Art Teacher.” Minnesota Business Academy, St. Paul, Minnesota. September 2000. VISITING ARTIST LECTURER “Senior Thesis Presentations.” Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Spring 1999. “Professional Practice and Portfolio Preparation.” University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. April 1999. “Introduction to the Profession of Graphic Design.” Dwight–Englewood School, Englewood, New Jersey. March 1998. EXHIBITIONS Dimension And Typography: A Survey Of Letterforms In Space And Time. I Space Gallery, Chicago, IL. January 2009. Artcrank-07. Invitational Poster Show, One on One, Minneapolis, MN. April 2007. Ms. Matched. Ivy Lounge, Minneapolis, MN. September 2005. The Mayor of Uptown. Central Air :: Nomadic Art Space, Minneapolis, MN. February 2005. 89th Annual Fine Arts Exhibition. Juried show, Minnesota State Fair, St. Paul, MN. August 2000. Radiator .001– UltraNormal. Group exhibition, Radiator Art Exhibition Company, Minneapolis, MN. September 1999. First Alert: prints and drawings. Dunn Brothers Coffee Gallery, Minneapolis, MN. November 1995. 84th Annual Fine Arts Exhibition. Juried show, Merit Award – drawings, Minnesota State Fair, St. Paul, MN. August 1995. Selections. Invitational exhibition, Minneapolis College of Art and Design. August 1994. CURATION—Central Air :: Nomadic Art Space 2005 – Present. Established Central Air :: Nomadic Art Space, I have organized exhibitions and produced opening receptions and exhibition catalogues, including the following: NoNegative: Photographic work by Jerome Page Tobias, May 2007. Baltimore, Maryland. Ivy Lounge: fashion, art, and music. July 2005 – March 2006. Curated a collection of exhibitions over several months at Ivy fashion boutique, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Featured by month and artist: July, Jennifer Davis; August, Roxanne Warren; September, Ms. Matched, works by J. Page; October, Amy Rice; November, Ellen Fitzgerald; December–March, Amy Crickenberger. The Mayor of Uptown, February 2005. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Curated an exhibition of eighteen artists including: John Diebel, John Urste, Dan Keefe, George Mahoney, David Foley, Michael & Abigail Mouw, Robert Roscoe, Terence P. Brashear, Flaneur Productions, John Veda, Nissa Hagstrom, Signe Albertson, Terrence Payne, Stacey Meyer, John Nelson, Clea Feline, Kate Pabst, and Alissa Valdovinos. CURATION—Radiator Art Exhibition Company September 1999 – December 2002, Co-founder, Curator and Director for Radiator Art Exhibition Company, co-curated exhibitions with Lee Anne Swanson-Peet. Its mission was to create a collective art space allowing founding-members to exhibit and promote their work as well as the works of like-minded artists. Radiator radically provided an exhibition space for group shows as well as thematic artist pairings. Radiator looked to reinvigorate the exhibition options in Minneapolis. .006 Duped, December 2002. Exhibiting paintings by Lee Anne Swanson-Peet and photographs by Danny Peet. .005 Ephemera Melancholia, December 2001. Featuring Ms. Davora Lindner, Darrin Mueske, and Anu Schwartz. .004 The Underside of Heaven, September 2001. Artists Erica Olson and Christopher Zerendow. .003 Save the Robots, April 2001. Artists J. J. Peet and Wilson Webb. .002 Industry Standard, September 2000. Group art exhibition including: Richard Brewer, Lee Anne Swanson-Peet, Carolyn Swiszcz, Al Wadzinski, David Wiedel, and John Parot. .001 UltraNormal, September 1999. Featuring artwork by: Amy Goldberg, Tracey Halvorsen, Randall Mastel, Maia Namtvedt, J. Page, Lee Anne Swanson-Peet, Carolyn Swiszcz, Amy Toscani, Wilson Webb, and David Wiedel.
  • RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS—Self Published Graphic Expression of Internment. John P. Corrigan. Published independently, blurb.com. Baltimore, MD, 2008. Nazi Anti-Semitic Propaganda: Historic Visual Survey. John P. Corrigan. Published independently, lulu.com. Baltimore, MD, 2007. FEATURED PUBLICATIONS “Exhibition Catalogs.” Indie Publishing: How to Design and Produce Your Own Book, by Ellen Lupton. MICA and Princeton Architectural Press, 2008. Pages 40, 43, 96-97, 98-101. Graphic Design: The New Basics, by Ellen Lupton, Jennifer Cole Phillips. Princeton Architectural Press, and Maryland Institute College of Art, 2008. Pages 132, 176-177, 179. PUBLICATION DESIGN Type + Code: Processing For Designers. By Yeohyun Ahn, and Viviana Cordova. MICA: Center for Design Thinking, 2009. NoNegative: Photographic works by Jerome Page Tobias. Central Air Nomadic Art Space. 2007. 500 Artists Return To Artists Space: 25 Years. Artists Space, New York, NY. 1998. 2wice: visual/culture/document. Uniform, Vol. 2, No. 2. 2wice Arts Foundation. 1998. ARTICLES + PRESS COVERAGE Natasha Walter. “Central Air Opens in Uptown,” Pulse of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis, February 23, 2005. “Best of the Twin Cities, BEST NEW ART TREND: Invasion of the Young Turks,” City Pages, Minneapolis, 2001. “Best of the Twin Cities, BEST GROUP ART SHOW: Radiator’s UltraNormal at the Minn Par Building,” City Pages, Minneapolis, 2000.
  • + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + SECTION ONE GRAPHIC DESIGN I) Research and Investigation is the key to developing design solutions. During this phase, the scope of work, problems and criteria are determined. The thoroughness of information obtained in this phase determines the success of the solutions. |
  • | 13 SPRING 2007 DOUBLES AND DOPPELGANGERS Three color memorial stones laid at Gemini Farms, Wadena, MN,PROJECT SUMMARY QUARTER ACRE LIFESTYLE
  • | 15 Art Exhibition Postcard Graphics, 2005 Art Exhibition Poster, 11x17, 2004 Exhibition Postcard, 4x6, 2004 ROSALUX GALLERY NEITHER HERE NOR THENNEOGRAPHY
  • | 17 Stationary System 2004 PROJECT SUMMARY Stationary system for architect Craig Beddow consisting of letterhead, envelope and business card. CRAIG BEDDOW, ARCHITECT
  • ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ::: REFINEMENT TWO ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ::: REFINEMENT TWO ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ::: REFINEMENT TWO ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Logo Design ::: REFINEMENT TWO ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex Logo Refinements, Round One | 19 CASE STUDY Stationary System 2006 PROJECT SUMMARY Stationary system for architect Dale Tremain consisting of letterhead, mailing label, envelope and business card. TREMAIN ARCHITECTS + PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN, ARCHITECT A R C H I T E C T U R E B U I L D I N G C O M M U N I T Y Logo Refinements, Round Two Type and Color Study Preliminary Concept
  • ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Tremain Stationary Design Front_Business Card: 2 x 3.5” Back_Business Card: 2 x 3.5” A T: +B C ARCHITECTS + PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN PRESIDENT 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 651.308.3257 datremain@aol.com :PHONE :EMAIL A R CHI TECTUR E BUI LDI NG COM M UNI T Y TREMAIN TREMAIN Typographic Annex e Tremain project ::: Tremain Stationary Design Front_Business Card: 2 x 3.5” Back_Business Card: 2 x 3.5” ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 651.308.3257 A R C H IT E C T U R E B U ILD IN G C O M M U N IT Y TREMAIN PRE SIDENT datremain@aol.comT: E: Front_Business Card: 2 x 3.5” Back_Business Card: 2 x 3.5” ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 651.308.3257 datremain@aol.com PHONE: EMAIL: ARCHITECTURE BUILDING COMMUNITY TREMAIN PRESIDENT ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Stationary System BUS Card: w3.5" h2.0" ADHESIVE Mailing Label: w5.0" h3.0" BUS Card: w3.5" h2.0" LTR Head: w8.5" h11.0" No. 10 Envelope: w9.5" h4.125" 02.14.06 Toni & Uri Sands/Pierce-Sands 88 N. Lexington Ave St. Paul, MN 55104 Dear Toni and Uri Sands My name is John Page Corrigan. I operate a small graphic design studio and art gallery. I have tremendous respect and devotion towards independent arts organiza- tions. As a designer, my interests in promotion and art event graphics, allow a needed voice to the organization, and participants to shine. I have designed art opening collateral materials for Rosalux Gallery that include posters, announcements cards, press kits, and installed vinyl graphics. I continue an ongoing relationship with Ivy, a small fashion boutique, with event graphics for fashion shows, curation of monthly art exhibitions, t-shirt designs, announcements, and programs. As a past designer in New York, I have worked for the publication 2WICE Magazine, formerly Dance Ink, produced by Patsy Tarr. A stunning collection of dance studio photographs, an emotional resonance was able to elaborate on movement, and evoke the soulfulness of dance itself. This influence, continues my motivated interest in the promotion of enveloping art institutions. This experience, my past design history, and passionate promotion of the arts, I feel makes me an ideal candidate for your graphic needs. I see from your website that Penny Freeh is a new addition to your register of dancers. Penny is the wife of a friend and collaborator of mine, Jim Bovino, I also noticed that you have performed at Jeune Lune, which is my favorite venue for arts performances in the Twin Cities. These Jeune Lune images, I feel evoke a strong and motivated response. A response that I can react to and promote with reverence and motivated inspiration. If you would like to meet for a full portfolio review, or if I can answer any further questions, please contact me. I look forward to hearing from you. Thank You. John P Corrigan A R C H I T E C T S + P L A N N E R S 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 T R E MAI N DALE TREMAIN PRESIDENT ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 TREMAIN ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 651.308.3257 TREMAIN PRE SI DENT datremain@aol.comT: E: ARCHITECTURE BUILDING COMMUNIT Y ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 ARCHITECTURE BUILDING COMMUNITY T: 651.308.3257 TREMAIN P R E S I DEN T E: datremain@aol.com ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Stationary System BUS Card: w3.5" h2.0" ADHESIVE Mailing Label: w5.0" h3.0" BUS Card: w3.5" h2.0" LTR Head: w8.5" h11.0" No. 10 Envelope: w9.5" h4.125" 02.14.06 Toni & Uri Sands/Pierce-Sands 88 N. Lexington Ave St. Paul, MN 55104 Dear Toni and Uri Sands My name is John Page Corrigan. I operate a small graphic design studio and art gallery. I have tremendous respect and devotion towards independent arts organiza- tions. As a designer, my interests in promotion and art event graphics, allow a needed voice to the organization, and participants to shine. I have designed art opening collateral materials for Rosalux Gallery that include posters, announcements cards, press kits, and installed vinyl graphics. I continue an ongoing relationship with Ivy, a small fashion boutique, with event graphics for fashion shows, curation of monthly art exhibitions, t-shirt designs, announcements, and programs. As a past designer in New York, I have worked for the publication 2WICE Magazine, formerly Dance Ink, produced by Patsy Tarr. A stunning collection of dance studio photographs, an emotional resonance was able to elaborate on movement, and evoke the soulfulness of dance itself. This influence, continues my motivated interest in the promotion of enveloping art institutions. This experience, my past design history, and passionate promotion of the arts, I feel makes me an ideal candidate for your graphic needs. I see from your website that Penny Freeh is a new addition to your register of dancers. Penny is the wife of a friend and collaborator of mine, Jim Bovino, I also noticed that you have performed at Jeune Lune, which is my favorite venue for arts performances in the Twin Cities. These Jeune Lune images, I feel evoke a strong and motivated response. A response that I can react to and promote with reverence and motivated inspiration. If you would like to meet for a full portfolio review, or if I can answer any further questions, please contact me. I look forward to hearing from you. Thank You. John P Corrigan A R C H I T E C T S + P L A N N E R S 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 TREMAIN DALE TREMAIN PRESIDENT ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 TREMAIN ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 651.308.3257 TREMAIN PRE SIDENT datremain@aol.comT: E: ARCHITECTURE BUILDING COMMUNIT Y ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 ARCHITECTURE BUILDING COMMUNITY T: 651.308.3257 TREMAIN P R E SIDENT E: datremain@aol.com ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Stationary System BUS Card: w3.5" h2.0" BUS Card: w3.5" h2.0" LTR Head: w8.5" h11.0" No. 10 Envelope: w9.5" h4.125" 02.14.06 Toni & Uri Sands/Pierce-Sands 88 N. Lexington Ave St. Paul, MN 55104 Dear Toni and Uri Sands My name is John Page Corrigan. I operate a small graphic design studio and art gallery. I have tremendous respect and devotion towards independent arts organiza- tions. As a designer, my interests in promotion and art event graphics, allow a needed voice to the organization, and participants to shine. I have designed art opening collateral materials for Rosalux Gallery that include posters, announcements cards, press kits, and installed vinyl graphics. I continue an ongoing relationship with Ivy, a small fashion boutique, with event graphics for fashion shows, curation of monthly art exhibitions, t-shirt designs, announcements, and programs. As a past designer in New York, I have worked for the publication 2WICE Magazine, formerly Dance Ink, produced by Patsy Tarr. A stunning collection of dance studio photographs, an emotional resonance was able to elaborate on movement, and evoke the soulfulness of dance itself. This influence, continues my motivated interest in the promotion of enveloping art institutions. This experience, my past design history, and passionate promotion of the arts, I feel makes me an ideal candidate for your graphic needs. I see from your website that Penny Freeh is a new addition to your register of dancers. Penny is the wife of a friend and collaborator of mine, Jim Bovino, I also noticed that you have performed at Jeune Lune, which is my favorite venue for arts performances in the Twin Cities. These Jeune Lune images, I feel evoke a strong and motivated response. A response that I can react to and promote with reverence and motivated inspiration. If you would like to meet for a full portfolio review, or if I can answer any further questions, please contact me. I look forward to hearing from you. Thank You. John P Corrigan ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 651.308.3257 TREMAIN PRE SI DENT datremain@aol.comT: E: A R C H IT E C T U R E B U ILD IN G C O M M U N IT Y ARCHITECTS +PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN 1487 GOODRICH AVENUE SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA 55105 ARCHITECTURE BUILDING COMMUNITY T: 651.308.3257 TREMAIN P R E S I DEN T E: datremain@aol.com | 21 CASE STUDY Stationary System 2006 PROJECT SUMMARY Stationary system for architect Dale Tremain consisting of letterhead, mailing label, envelope and business card. TREMAIN ARCHITECTS + PLANNERS DALE TREMAIN, ARCHITECT A R C H I T E C T U R E B U I L D I N G C O M M U N I T Y client ::: Dale Tremain project ::: Stationary System ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex Preliminary Business Card Concept Business Card Refinements Stationary System
  • | 23 1/2 gallon carton 1/2 gallon plastic Designed branding logo simplyright from Schroeder, in co-ordination with Kathy Sorranno simplyright brand, is based on the milk packaging system for Schroeder Milk, under Kathy Sorranno at bamboo, Minneapolis, MN whole, skim, one, two PACKAGE DESIGN 2001 PROJECT SUMMARY Milk packaging design for simplyright, a rBST hormone free milk class offering from Schroeder, 2001 DESIGN OFFICE: bamboo, Minneapolis SCHROEDER MILK CO.
  • | 25 POSTER APPLICATION SERIES RICK VALICENTI DAVID PLUNKERT PAUL SAHRE FALL 2006 ALL POSTERS 20”x30” CASE STUDYDESIGN LANGUAGE STUDIO
  • | 27 Gallery 360, Announcement Postcard, 2002. Art Exhibition Postcards, 1998-2001. Swallow Gallery, NYC; Announcement Card, 2000. Swallow Gallery, NYC; Announcement Card, 2002. Art Exhibition Postcards, 2000. LEE ANNE SWANSON ARTIST PROMOTION
  • | 29 NATIONAL PORTFOLIO DAY Maryland Institute College of Art Atlanta, GA Baltimore, MD PROJECT SUMMARY A grouping of unused National Portfolio Day posters designed for the Maryland Institute College of Art communications office.
  • | 31 BROADSIDES Quarrel My Mother Dresses in Ensembles Letterpress Screen prints PROJECT SUMMARY Printed broadsides with visual and concrete poetry. flash burst blaze
  • | 33 THE MAYOR OF UPTOWN Press Release Announcement cards. The Mayor of Uptown Mission Statement: As curator and observer, my intentions are to bring together seemingly disparate artists interpretations under the confines of what makes a GREAT collection of ideas vs. a good group show. I look at artists objectives, and render a visual connect between the artist and the eyewitness and postulate what the two may create together. The idea of CENTRAL AIR, a preset, a control, a distinctive set of variables enabled to create a level of comfort. The energy it takes to cool, is that much greater than to actively heat a space. Set the temp. to an easy comfort level. Relax, let the air blow. ENJOY. J. Page CENTRAL AIR Nomadic Art Space Presents PRESS KIT: For Immediate Release Contact: J. Page Corrigan, T. 612.703.5444 Under the coolness of CENTRAL AIR, former co-founder and co-curator of Radiator Art Exhibition Company, John Page Corrigan, curates a brief showing of exceptionally diverse and astute visual artists. From flower arrangements, lighting design, furniture, jewelry, the medium of paint and collage, and through photographic allure. The Mayor of Uptown, might reflect on the changing nature of attitudes and architecture of the Uptown neighborhood. The Mayor of Uptown, might connect a variety of south Minneapolis artists that crave a voice in the insular Minneapolis art community. The Mayor of Uptown, will offer artistic variance of similarly like-minded artists with the chance to run a visual campaign in the center of historic Uptown Minneapolis. PROJECT SUMMARY Established Central Air Nomadic Art Space, Curated the Mayor of Uptown, February, 2005 Installation of 18 artists work; photography, painting, sculpture, performance, flora, furniture and jewelry. February 10th through 26th Artist Reception Friday 18 February, 2005 6-11 pm GALLERY HOURS: Thur. and Fri. 1–7 pm Sat. and Sun. 1–6 pm IN THE OLD LOBBY OF THE CALHOUN HOTEL 1428 WEST 31ST ST.
  • |J. Page John Diebel John Urste Dan Keefe George Mahoney David Foley Michael & Abigail Mouw Robert Roscoe Terence P. Brashear Flaneur Productions John Veda Nissa Hagstrom Signe Albertson Terrence Payne Stacey Meyer John Nelson Clea Feline Kate Pabst Alissa Valdovinos anyone else... John Page Corrigan Former co-founder and co-curator of Radiator Art Exhibition Company City Pages 2000 Best of the Twin Cities BEST GROUP ART SHOW Radiator’s UltraNormal at the MinnPar Building Oh, to be a new “nomadic” arts organization like Radiator bursting on the scene, heart all aflutter with its first show! This exhibition from late September of last year was a colorful, energetic, and witty conglomeration of work by ten young local artists. And its mere existence indicates that good art continues to be made in the Twin Cities despite the relatively difficult time young artists have in making their mark. The work in all manner of media—painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, installation, and points in between—was vibrant and humorous, full of exuberance and color. Curator Lee Anne Swanson’s smallish paintings were dense with cake-frosting- colored swirls and depicted ironically idealized scenes of ducks, ponds, and the like; Carol Swiszcz’s faux-naif scratchy drawings—on paper, on the wall, on whatever was at hand—presented personal stories culled from her own Middle American life. That the show was exhibited in the far-off and grimy confines of an empty warehouse, the MinnPar Building, is indicative of the lack of money available to new art groups and young artists—and their ingenuity in facing that fact. That not much has been heard from Radiator nearly six months later gives one pause—and inspires prayers for another such burst of fresh energy in the often staid local art scene. City Pages 2001 Best of the Twin Cities BEST NEW ART TREND Invasion of the Young Turks Much like the fin-de-siècle Ottoman Empire, today’s art world is stagnant and unproductive, a victim of the bloated success at the upper echelons (Manhattan’s art scene being a distant and inaccessible sultan’s palace, so to speak). Fortunately for the Ottomans, a collection of transnational army officers, dubbed the Young Turks, led a successful coup and after 1908 instituted a sweeping program of modernizing reforms. Our dismal local art scene is ripe for just the same sort of updating, so it is fortunate that a new class of brash young artists and gallery owners-- Joe Del Pesco, John Corrigan, J. Heikes, Jennifer Murphy—are settling into town just as indicators point the fine-art world toward oblivion. Our Young Turks, like those of yore, come from all over-- New Jersey, Delaware, Oregon, Georgia—apparently attracted to the high local standard of living by a sense of adventure, and, perhaps most important, our local sultanate of arts-funding institutions. The past few months things have been looking up in the art scene, as the Young Turks have opened new galleries such as the Waiting Room and the Radiator Art Exhibition Co. In the process, they’ve reinvigorated the exhibition options for an artist pool eager for new places to show work. We can only hope that our Young Turks stick around longer than the originals, whose ten years of inept rule eventually helped bring about World War I and the dissolution of the Ottoman state. CENTRAL AIR Nomadic Art Space Presents
  • | 37 September, 1999 .001_ultranormal December, 2000 .002_industry standards April, 2001 .003_save the robots September, 2001 .004_the underside of heaven RADIATOR ART EXHIBITION COMPANY Co-founder+Director+Curator of gallery and exhibition space, providing support for emerging contemporary artists.
  • | 39 RADIATOR ART EXHIBITION COMPANY December, 2001 .005_ephemera melancholia October, 2002 Bird x bird December, 2002 .006_duped
  • | 41 S TAT E M E N T: Collecting found images is an obsession for me. I am inspired by the satisfaction that I get from combining paint with images torn from magazines and newspapers and giving them new life. Painting is a daily ritual for me and by finishing most of my works in one sitting I am able to use art as a journal for my ideas, experiences and memories. There is little or no planning involved in any of my paintings, rather they develop specifically through the artmaking process. The narratives become apparent through cutting, pasting and painting. Making art is a release for me. It is my hope that others will find wonder in my images which may then spark their own imaginations. B I O : Jennifer Davis has lived all of her life in Minnesota. She discovered her passion for painting and drawing at the University of Minnesota and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1998. Jennifer has shown her work in several galleries in Minnesota, New York, Vermont and North Carolina and has been a member of Rosalux Gallery in Minneapolis since 2002. For more information please visit: www.jenniferdavisart.com I V Y L O U N G E Art Scapes Jennifer Davis ivy lounge curated by C E N T R A L A I R : : : Nomad i c A r t S p ac e IVYS T AT E M E N T: I first started using Polaroid films in an experimental photo class when I was in college. Along with other experimental methods, I was intrigued by the limitless creative possibilities that this film offers. The curiosity was forever changed when my Grandmother handed me an old leather pop up Polaroid Land Camera. Now, I stalk the sun and wait. With my bag of tools—toothpicks, dull pencils & knitting needles. It is the world of SX-70, where you look to subjects not only for that certain Je ne c’est quoi, but for the subjects ability to melt and transform. In the time it takes the emulsion to harden there is a vast creative workspace. Sometimes I feel that the subject reveals itself in that space of time. Is it a cartoon, a childhood memory, or a dream that I can’t quite remember…? There are times when I start getting too serious or tight—so I take a walk with my Polaroid. It calms me, reminds me to slow down and look at the world around me. There is so much beauty. There is A poetic quality to things that starts to appear. It is the light hearted old romantic side my artist—the part of me that wants to be reminded of simpler times… or maybe it’s the part of me that wants to live outside reality—where things are not quite as they seem—where lines begin to blur and the magic appears. i v y l o u n g e Art Scapes Roxanna Warren ivy lounge curated by C E N T R A L A I R : : : N o m a d i c A r t S p a c e MS. MATCHED Marguerite and Fred Tobias My grandfather and grandmother intentions were to document their own lives, and the family member around them. Occasionally, they were also to capture the catastrophes of the region. My grandfather managed to be almost drawn to the later, the great river flood of 1960 something, a downtown warehouse fire, the tornado destruction in Hopkins, MN. He also was seeming drawn to the mundane aspects of a squirrel, or perhaps a cake at a funeral or anniversary. My grandmother, with good intentions—labeled boxes of Kodak Ektachrome™, having listed dates, places, occasions, and the very family members that included them both apparently as voyeur. These gatherings, and happenings, allowed them to exchange the camera and note taking. They seem to move freely, and gather images as a nonparticipant, document librarians askew. As with any photographer, volume is the key towards the potential of a great image. By pairing up several photos, a new context increases the potential accuracy, or questioning(?) of events. A second generation historians take on unknown events. With so many images, and badly mis- labeled groupings, without the matriarch and patriarch, I intend to create a new story, part fiction, part truth. The time to create my own (his)story, from the past that I come from, and have believed to be incorporated into my very own truth. ENJOY ! © 2005 J Page ALL RIGHTS RESERVED NOMADIC ART S P A C E+ THISSIDE TOWARDSSCREEN I V Y L O U N G E P R E S E N T S ARTSCAPESCURATEDBY ARTIST STATEMENT Most of my work is created using large plastic stencils that I design and cut myself. Often 3-4 different layers (each layer representing a different color) are needed to complete an image. I will sometimes cut a stencil of just an outline of an image and use watercolors, acrylics or house paint to color it in. Although this medium is basically a form of printmaking, I have the freedom to experiment with color, surface texture, and grouping of objects and thus mood and tone, making each piece unique. As an art instructor/advocate for adults with severe and persistent mental illness, I am a true believer in the powerful healing tool that art can be. I am inspired in my life and in my art by the struggles and successes of my clients. I am additionally inspired by the urban community in which I live, childhood toys, vintage botanical prints, my dog Ella, bicycles, street art, and random found objects, collective endeavors that challenge hierarchy, acts of compassion, downright silliness and things with wings. Grow flowers. Ride a bike. Love an animal. Learn something new. Find your wings. Make art of it all. 1226 Adams St. NE #2 Minneapolis MN 55413 612 379 0192 amyr@amyrice.com I V Y L O U N G E PRESENTS A M Y R I C E 1:4 2:1 3:1 1:1 curated by July, 2005 Jennifer davis August, 2005 roxanne warren September, 2005 j. page_Ms. matched October, 2005 amy rice Ivy + Central Air present IVY Lounge Womens fashion boutique, Minneapolis, MN. Press Release, Announcement cards, T-shirt design Series of announcement post cards, 4 x 6”
  • | 43 Recent work by Ellen Darth Fitzgerald. Ellen recently received her MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art + Design, and will be teaching photography in the following semester. Her portraits, from friends to strangers looks at the potential distance of the viewer and the observed. Heavy breath and coldness capture a womans unusually unique beauty. ARTIST STATEMENT Ellen was raised in the swamps of Florida, sandwiched between space shuttles and theme parks. As a teenager, she saw the work of Rineke Dijkstra, and subsequently moved to the icy Midwest to study photography. After a brief stint in New York, where she was bullied by art stars, Ellen eventually returned to the south. When the gators and tourists became too much to bear, she migrated north to Minnesota. When she isn’t taking photographs, she is learning how to play the drums and planning trips to far off places. Minneapolis Minnesota 612.327.1258 ladydarth@mac.com I V Y L O U N G E P R E S E N T S E L L E N F I T Z G E R A L D 1:4 2:1 3:1 1:1 curated by ELLEN D. FITZGERALD Untitled from ”Outside” series C-Print 20”x16” 2003-2004 $125 per image $1500 for series denim exchange PRE-HOLIDAY SALE SUMMER SALE Special event design and marketing collateral Ivy + Central Air present IVY Lounge IVY Fashion Boutique November 2005 ellen fitzgerald
  • | 45 NEW VIEWS Poster Submissions Self-AuthoredPROJECT SUMMARY Poster design for submission to New Views 2, an international conference held at the London College of Communication, July 2008.
  • | 47 MS. MATCHED Self-AuthoredPROJECT SUMMARY DOCUMENTATION ASKEW: Marguerite and Fred Tobias digital prints of slides from grandparents, manipulating grandmothers handwritten labels of slide contents with mismatched descriptions of relatives, places, and events.
  • + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++ ++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ SECTION TWO TYPOGRAPHY + TYPE DESIGN II) Concept and Design is the phase when potential solutions are conceived and developed, based upon information gathered in the first phase. At the conclusion of this phase, the final designs and copy are completed, then reviewed and approved by the client. |
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 51 Constructed photographic type prepared for Marian Bantjes EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY ANXIOUS ANXIETY
  • WRITING LETTERING + TYPE | FALL 2006 EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY PROJECT SUMMARY 53 KEN BARBER CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZ BEN KIEL WRITING LETTERING TYPE NAMEPLATE WRITING LETTERING TYPE
  • | FALL 2006 EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY PROJECT SUMMARY 55 KEN BARBER CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZ BEN KIEL MATERIAL OBSESSIONS FLAT PROVIDES EASY ACCESS TO A WELL-DESIGNED APARTMENT, OR FLAT (UK). WE ARE A ONE-STOP RESOURCE FROM SOME OF THE MOST EXCITING FURNITURE DESIGNERS INTERNATIONALLY. THE DESIRE TO DELIVER GREAT PRODUCTS TO A BROADER GROUP OF PEOPLE AND TO ELEVATE THE INTEREST IN LEGITIMATE DESIGN HAS BEEN HERE SINCE THE BAUHAUS. OUR GOAL IS SIMPLYTO ACCELERATE THE WAY THAT DESIGN GETS TO THE PUBLIC. UNFINISHED PINE TOP TRESTLE TABLE WITH TWO SAW HORSES $ 675.00 06.FLAT.PIN.3960.TBL H:31.5 X W:39 L:60 E AT AT IT ANTIQUE STYLED TABLE TOP ACCESSORIES FACTORY GREEN $ 89.00 POWDER BLUE $ 95.00 WOODEN AMMUNITION STORAGE BOX $ 115.00 KITCHEN TABLES COVER SAMPLE SPREAD FLAT CATALOGUE FLAT LETTERING
  • | FALL 2006 EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY PROJECT SUMMARY 57 KEN BARBER CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZ BEN KIEL ©2006 NovaClutch Typographic Annex client ::: Experimental Type project ::: Type as Texture 9377100001 8.4 FL. OZ [250mL] EXTRACTED USEFUL TASTY REFRESH AND RESTORE Zh(e) is full of the right stuff to help support active joint mobility. Naturally extracted birch juice is both useful and tasty, Zh(e) is a delicious solution for enhanced movement and flexibility. LUSCIOUS NATURAL BIRCH FLAVOR CERTAINLY TO MAKE IT MORE TASTY A LITTLE SUGAR HAS BEEN ADDED. IN THE TRADITION OF BELARUS, RUSSIA CAN GRAPHICSCARTON KEY LINE Zhe RUSSIAN BIRCH JUICE PACKAGE DESIGN TYPE AS TEXTURE BORROWED LANGUAGE LOGO DESIGN Zhe RUSSIAN BIRCH JUICE
  • | 59 FALL 2006 EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY SOVADA ƒ. Typeface PROJECT SUMMARY PROJECT SUMMARY KEN BARBER CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZ BEN KIEL S E C U L A R H E B R E W D A T E S U N R I S E N O O N S U N S E T T W I L I G H T M O N T H M O N T H M A R C H 26 6:02 12:13 18:24 19:03 N I S S A N 28 5:57 12:12 18:27 19:07 A P R I L 1 5:52 12:11 18:30 19:10 4 5:48 12:10 18:32 19:13 7 5:43 12:09 18:35 19:16 10 5:38 12:08 18:38 19:19 12 5:34 12:08 18:41 19:22 16 5:29 12:07 18:44 19:26 19 5:25 12:06 18:47 19:29 22 5:21 12:05 18:50 19:32 I Y A R 24 5:17 12:05 18:53 19:36 28 5:13 12:05 18:56 19:39 M A Y 1 5:09 12:04 18:59 19:42 4 5:05 12:04 19:02 19:46 7 5:02 12:03 19:05 19:49 10 4:59 12:03 19:08 19:52 13 4:56 12:03 19:11 19:56 16 4:53 12:03 19:13 19:59 19 4:50 12:03 19:16 20:02 22 4:48 12:03 19:19 20:05 S I V A N 26 4:46 12:04 19:21 20:08 28 4:44 12:04 19:24 20:11 31 4:43 12:04 19:26 20:13 J U N E 3 4:41 12:05 19:28 21:16 6 4:40 12:05 19:30 20:18 9 4:40 12:06 19:32 20:20 12 4:39 12:06 19:33 20:22 15 4:39 12:07 19:34 20:23 18 4:39 12:07 19:36 20:24 21 4:40 12:08 19:36 20:25 T A M M U Z 25 4:40 12:09 19:37 20:26 27 4:41 12:09 19:37 20:26 30 4:43 12:10 19:37 20:26 J U L Y 3 4:44 12:10 19:37 20:25 6 4:46 12:11 19:36 20:24 9 4:47 12:11 19:35 20:23 12 4:49 12:12 19:34 20:22 15 4:51 12:12 19:33 20:20 18 4:54 12:13 19:31 20:18 21 4:56 12:13 19:29 20:15 A V 24 4:59 12:13 19:27 20:13 27 5:01 12:13 19:24 20:10 30 5:04 12:13 19:22 20:07 A U G U S T 2 5:06 12:12 19:19 20:03 5 5:09 12:12 19:15 20:00 8 5:12 12:12 19:12 19:56 11 5:15 12:11 19:08 19:52 14 5:17 12:11 19:04 19:47 17 5:20 12:10 19:01 19:43 20 5:23 12:10 18:56 19:39 23 5:26 12:09 18:52 19:34 E L U L 25 5:28 12:08 18:48 19:29 29 5:31 12:07 18:43 19:24 S E P T E M B E R 1 5:34 16:06 18:39 19:20 4 5:37 12:05 18:34 19:15 7 5:39 12:04 18:29 19:10 10 5:42 12:03 18:25 19:05 13 5:45 12:02 18:20 19:00 16 5:48 12:01 18:15 18:55 19 5:50 12:00 18:10 18:50 T I S H R I 23 5:53 11:59 18:05 18:45 25 5:56 11:58 18:00 18:40 28 5:59 11:57 17:55 18:35 O C T O B E R 1 6:02 11:56 17:51 19:30 4 6:04 11:55 17:46 18:25 7 6:07 11:54 17:41 18:21 10 6:10 11:53 17:37 18:16 13 6:13 11:53 17:32 18:12 16 6:16 11:52 17:28 18:07 19 6:19 11:51 17:23 18:03 C H E S H V A N 23 6:22 11:51 17:19 17:59 25 6:26 11:50 17:15 17:56 28 6:29 11:50 17:11 17:52 31 6:32 11:50 17:08 17:48 N O V E M B E R 3 6:35 11:50 17:04 17:45 6 6:39 11:50 17:01 17:42 9 6:42 11:50 16:58 17:39 12 6:46 11:50 16:55 17:37 15 6:49 11:51 16:53 17:35 18 6:52 11:51 16:50 17:33 K I S L E V 22 6:56 11:52 16:48 17:31 24 6:59 11:53 16:47 17:30 27 7:02 11:54 16:45 17:29 30 7:05 11:55 16:44 17:28 D E C E M B E R 3 7:08 11:56 16:44 17:27 6 7:11 11:57 16:43 17:27 9 7:14 11:58 16:43 17:27 12 7:16 12:00 16:44 17:28 15 7:18 12:01 16:44 17:28 18 7:20 12:03 16:45 17:29 T E V E T 22 7:22 12:04 16:46 17:31 24 7:24 12:06 16:48 17:32 27 7:25 12:07 16:50 17:34 30 7:26 12:09 16:52 17:36 SECULARHEBREWDATESUNRISENOONSUNSETTWILIGHT MONTHMONTH JANUARY17:2612:1016:5317:37 47:2612:1116:5617:40 77:2612:1316:5917:43 107:2612:1417:0217:45 137:2612:1517:0517:48 167:2512:1617:0817:51 SHEVAT207:2312:1717:1117:54 227:2212:1817:1517:57 257:2012:1917:1818:00 287:1812:2017:2118:04 317:1512:2017:2518:07 FEBRUARY37:1212:1917:2918:10 67:1012:1817:3218:13 97:0612:1717:3618:17 127:0312:1617:3918:20 156:5912:1517:4318:23 186:5612:1517:4618:26 ADAR(I)226:5212:1417:4918:29 246:4812:1317:5318:33 276:4312:1217:5618:36 MARCH26:3912:1117:5918:39 56:3512:1018:0218:42 86:3012:0918:0518:45 116:2612:0818:0918:48 146:2112:0818:1218:51 176:1612:0718:1518:54 206:1112:0618:1818:57 236:0712:0518:2119:00 2007 2006 5767 PERMANENT CALENDAR BALTIMORE—WASHINGTON G.M.T. -5:00 LAT. 39° N LONG. 77° ADJ. 6:5 JUDAIC SOLAR CALENDAR 20 x 30” 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 8 pt. 12 pt. 24 pt. FOUND NUMERIC EPHEMERA NUMERALS
  • | FALL 2006 EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY PROJECT SUMMARY 61 KEN BARBER CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZ BEN KIEL POSTER APPLICATION WORD SAMPLES MODULAR TYPE 4x MODULES MODULAR NUMERALS MODULAR TYPOGRAPHY GLEN BURNIE ƒ. TypefacePROJECT SUMMARY
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 63 NovaClutch // Typographic Annex ƒ_ Turner ªTºUºR_NªEºR_Regular TURNEROblique ƒ. Turner_Regular ƒ. Turner_Oblique Digital typeface design consisting of a complete and full character set with additional snap on slab-serif letter extensions. Digital Type Design ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 -=!@#$%^&*()_+ {}|:”<>?[];’,./ ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 -=!@#$%^&*()_+ {}|:”<>?[];’,./ TURNER ƒ. TypefacePROJECT SUMMARY
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 65 Type sampling and complete character set display. Digital Type Design TURNER 12pts (Complete Character Set) BASIC ALPHABET AÆBCÇDEFGHIJKLMNOŒØPQRSTUVWXYZ/ aæbcçdeffiflghijklmnoœøpqrstuvwxyz 1234567890 °’”$¢ƒß£¥%⁄#&.,:;…·!?“”‘’•- – —*„‚_|®©™([{«»‹›}])ˆ˜¯˘˙˚¸˝˛ˇ`´¨†‡§¶@+=± TURNER 36pts. (Complete Character Set) BASIC ALPHABET AÆBCÇDEFGHIJKLMNOŒØPQRSTUVWXYZ/ aæbcçdeffiflghijklmnoœøpqrstvwxyz 1234567890 °’”$¢ƒß£¥%⁄#&.,:;…·!?“”‘’•- –*„‚_|®©™([{«»‹›}])ˆ˜¯˘˙˚¸˝˛ˇ`´¨ †‡§¶@+=± TURNER 24pts. (Sample Kerning Pairs) AT AV AW AY Av Aw Ay Fa Fe Fo Kv Kw Ky LO LV LY PA Pa Pe Po TA Ta Te Ti To Tr Ts Tu Ty UA VA Va Ve Vo Vr Vu Vy WA WO Wa We Wr Wv Wy TURNER 24pts. (Sample lowercase/incidentals) w! w? f! f? ¡a ¿a «n»«o»‹n›‹o›h∂ho&o‚{h}h•ho•oh@hªhºh⁄h‚h„h™h®h©hh·ho·o`´˘¨ˆ˜¯ˇ˙˚¸˝˛ˆh ”h“h“w”h.h,h:h;‘h’o.o,o:o;‘o’(h)[h]h/hh(o)[o]h-ho- o(h)[h]h/hh#(o)[o]hho-h£h$h¢hƒh¥hh*h†h‡h§h–ho–oh h—ho— oh+h=h±h’h”h°h#hh%h‰h…h1h2h3h4h5h0hh6h7h8h9h0h£1101213141 51$1617181912223242526¢27282930% TURNER 24pts. (Sample Sidebearing test) HAHBHCHDHEHFHGHHHIHJHKHLHMHNHOHPHQHRHSHTHUHVHWHXHYH ZHÆHŒHÄHÖHÜHÅHÇHÁHÛHÍHÏHÌHÓEHÙHØH&HaHbHcHdHeHfHgHhHi HjHvkHlHmHnHoHpHqHrHsHtHuHvHwHxHyHzHßHæHœHäHöHüHfiHflHå HıHçHøH1H2H3H4H5H6H7H8H9H0H£H¢H$H¥HƒH!H¡H?H¿H*H#H/H+H=H÷H ≠H±HvH∂H◊H≈H√H~HµH∞H.H,H;H:H”H”H”H‘H’H…H‹H›H»H«H[H]H(H)H{H}H ⁄H–H‰H%H¶H|H’H™H®H©H•H@H˘HˆH`H´HˇH˜H¨H·H¸H¯H˚H˛H˝H˙H TURNER 12pts. TURNER 24pts. TURNER 36pts. Think about it. ªTUºRN_EºRNovaClutch // Typographic Annex NovaClutch // Typographic Annex ƒ_ Turner I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZÆŒ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzfiflßæœ ÁÀÂÄÃÅÇÉÈËÊÍÌÎÏÑÓÒÔÖÕØÚÙÛÜŸ «áàâäãåçéèêëíìîïñóòôöõøúùûüÿ»1234567890 ({[*•·.,:;“”‘’¿?¡!/$¥£ƒ¢¶§†‡&#@%ªº™©®]}) SET THE ABOVE COPY IN A SIZE THAT WILL ACCOMMODATE THE ENTIRE QUOTE SET THE ABOVE COPY LINE FOR LINE. VARY SIZE AND SPACING AS NECESSARY SHOW THE CHARACTER SET AS LARGE AS POSSIBLE. ªPACK MY BOX WITH ºFIVE DOZEºN_ _LIQUºOºR JUºGS!PANGRAM HEADLINE MUST BE SET IN ALL CAPS. SIZE WILL VARY SLIGHTLY DEPENDING ON LENGTH OF PANGRAM USED. ©NovaClutch // Typographic Annex I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most impor- tant feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits could create a popular demand but we must also consider that this popularity may only be temporary. Personally, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. I know we all feel our designs will last forever, but some things like music don’t last either. It’s like “here today and forgotten tomorrow.” Anyway, you and I can be sure of one thing: the number of typefaces will surly increase. —ED BENGUIAT, as quoted in U&lc ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZÆŒ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzfiflßæœ ÁÀÂÄÃÅÇÉÈËÊÍÌÎÏÑÓÒÔÖÕØÚÙÛÜŸ «áàâäãåçéèêëíìîïñóòôöõøúùûüÿ»1234567890 ({[*•·.,:;“”‘’¿?¡!/$¥£ƒ¢¶§†‡&#@%ªº™©®]}) 14/16 12/14 10/12 10/12 REVERSED 9/11 8/10 SET THE ABOVE COPY IN A SIZE THAT WILL ACCOMMODATE THE ENTIRE QUOTE SHOW THE CHARACTER SET AS LARGE AS POSSIBLE. 7/8 6/7 ªTH_E TRIXTEºR WITH A SENC_E ºOºF HUMOºR HAS TªHE_ ILLUSION TO DUPE_PANGRAM HEADLINE MUST BE SET IN ALL CAPS. SIZE WILL VARY SLIGHTLY DEPENDING ON LENGTH OF PANGRAM USED. NovaClutch // Typographic Annex I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most important feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits could create a popular demand but we must also consider that this popularity may only be temporary. Personally, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. I know we all feel our designs will last forever, but some things like music don’t last either. It’s like “here today and forgotten tomorrow.” Anyway, you and I can be sure of one thing: the number of typefaces will surly increase. —ED BENGUIAT, as quoted in U&lc I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most important feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most impor- tant feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most important feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits could create a popular demand but we must also consider that this popularity may only be temporary. Personally, I don’t think there’s anything I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most important feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its charac- ter that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits could create a popular demand but we must also consider that this popularity may only be temporary. Personally, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. I know we all feel our designs will last forever, but some things like music I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most important feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most important feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits could create a popular demand but we must also consider that this popularity may only be temporary. Personally, I don’t think there’s I think it’s rather difficult to create a new typeface design, or for that matter, to create a new anything that’s in everyday use. A new piece of music would parallel the creation of a new typeface. For example, the notes of music don’t change, and the letters of the alpha-bet don’t change, either. It’s a matter of how they’re put together. The most impor- tant feature must be that its newness has a reflection all its own and fits into the pattern of today’s generation of graphic designers. The new creation must have something in its character that makes the potential user sit up and take notice. These typographic traits TURNER ƒ. TypefacePROJECT SUMMARY
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 67 A series of typographic sketches used as educational examples in the manipulation of typographic hierarchy. Each sketch uses the same components to create a high degree of contrast between each elements of the design. Through the series of five, each single piece of information should shift its importance to reveal its self to the reader. These examples were a submission to the Maryland Institute College of Art MFA studio book project Graphic Design: The New Basics, edited by Ellen Lupton. In each: 1.) Name 2.) Birthdate 3.) Objects of obsession 4.) A family secret 5.) Photograph of hand HIGH CONTRAST TYPOGRAPHIC HIERARCHY STUDIES Graphic Design: The New Basics 2 197 FIR S T A ID A N D R E D C R O S S E P H E M E R A P R IN C IP LE S O F A B S T R A C T M A T H FO U N D A R T H IS TO R IC T Y P O G R A P H IC S A M P LE S M E TA P H O R IC A L P O E T R Y TH R O U G H STO R IES O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G R EA T A U N T LU C ILLE, IT W A S R EV EA LED TH A T FO R TH IR TY Y EA R S S H E H A D B EEN S EC R ETLY M A R R IED . A U N T LU A N D H ER H U S BA N D JEFF H A D A C H ILD EA R LY IN TH ER E R ELA TIO N S H IP,W H O D IED A T B IR TH IN 1939.M Y A U N T A N D H ER H U S BA N D N EV ER LIV ED TO G ETH ER , A N D H A D K EP T TH EIR M A R R IA G E A S H R O U D ED S EC R ET FR O M M Y G R EA T G R A N D M O TH ER A N N A M P U H L U N TIL H ER D EA TH IN 1965. A FTER W H IC H , LU A N D H ER H U S BA N D C O N TIN U ED TO LIV E A PA R T O U T O F R ES P EC T TO H ER M O TH ER . TH IS S EC R ET W A S TO LD IN B ITS A N D P IEC ES A N D IS O LA TIO N .TH IS S EC R ET W A S P R ES U M ED Y ET R EM A IN ED U N K N O W N TH R O U G H O U T TH E FA M ILY. 111 1 10 JO H N P A G E C O R R IG A N TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE, IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D. AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N - SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPTTH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965. AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E APART O UT O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD IN BIT S AN D PIE CES AN D IS O LATIO N . TH IS SECRET W AS PRESU M ED YET REM AIN ED U N KN O W N TH RO U G HO UT TH E FAM ILY. TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE,IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D.AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPT TH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE,IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D.AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPT TH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E APART O UT O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD I TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE,IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D.AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPT TH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E APART O UT O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD IN BIT S AN D PIE CES AN D IS O LATIO N .TH IS SECRET W AS PRESU M ED YET REM AIN ED U N KN O W N TH RO U G HO UT TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE,IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D.AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPT TH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E APART O UT O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD IN BIT S AN D PIE CES AN D IS O LATIO N .TH IS SECRET W AS PRESU M ED YET REM AIN ED U N KN O W N TH RO U G HO UT TH E FAM ILY. TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE,IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D.AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPT TH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E APART O UT O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD IN BIT S AN D PIE CES AN D IS O LATIO N .TH IS SECRET W AS PRESU M ED YET REM AIN ED U N KN O W N TH RO U G HO UT TH E FAM ILY. TH RO U G H STO RIE S O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CIL LE,IT W AS REVEALED TH AT FO R TH IR TY YEARS SH E H AD BEEN SECRETLY M ARRIE D.AU N T LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D JEFF H AD A CH IL D EARLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W HO D IE D AT BIR TH IN 1939.M Y AU N T AN D H ER H U SBAN D N EVER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,AN D H AD KEPT TH EIR M ARRIA G E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RAN D M O TH ER AN N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.AFTER W H IC H ,LU AN D H ER H U SBAN D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E APART O UT O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD IN BIT S AN D PIE CES AN D IS O LATIO N .TH IS SECRET W AS PRESU M ED YET REM AIN ED U N KN O W N TH RO U G HO UT TH E FAM ILY. 2 2 3 4 5 FIR S T A ID A N D R E D C R O S S E P H E M E R A P R IN C IP LE S O F A B S T R A C T M A T H FO U N D A R T H IS TO R IC T Y P O G R A P H IC S A M P LE S M E TA P H O R IC A L P O E T R Y 01 D ecem ber1971 JO H N P A G E C O R R IG A N TH RO U G H STO RIES O FTEN TO LD BY M Y G REAT AU N T LU CILLE,IT W AS REV EA LED TH AT FO R TH IRTY YEA RS SH E H A D BEEN SECRETLY M A RRIED. AU N T LU A N D H ER H U SBA N D JEFF H A D A CH ILD EA RLY IN TH ERE RELATIO N SH IP,W H O D IED AT BIRTH IN 1939.M Y AU N T A N D H ER H U SBA N D N EV ER LIV ED TO G ETH ER,A N D H A D KEPT TH EIR M A RRIAG E A SH RO U D ED SECRET FRO M M Y G REAT G RA N D M O TH ER A N N A M PU H L U N TIL H ER D EATH IN 1965.A FTER W H ICH ,LU A N D H ER H U SBA N D CO N TIN U ED TO LIV E A PA RT O U T O F RESPECT TO H ER M O TH ER.TH IS SECRET W AS TO LD IN BITS A N D PIECES A N D ISO LATIO N .TH IS SECRET W AS PRESU M ED YET REM A IN ED U N KN O W N TH RO U G H O U T TH E FA M ILY 2 3FIR S T A ID A N D R E D C R O S S E P H E M E R A P R IN C IP LE S O F A B S T R A C T M A T H FO U N D A R T H IS T O R IC T Y P O G R A P H IC S A M P LE S M E TA P H O R IC A L P O E T R Y 0 1 D E C E M B E R 1 9 7 1 J O H N P A G E C O R R I G A N One of five Two of five Three of five HIGH CONTRAST LAYERING HIERARCHY
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 69 T H R O U G H S T O R IE S O F T E N T O L D B Y M Y G R E A T A U N T L U C IL L E , IT W A S R E V E A L E D T H A T F O R T H IR T Y Y E A R S S H E H A D B E E N S E C R E T L Y M A R R IE D . A U N T L U A N D H E R H U S B A N D J E F F H A D A C H IL D E A R L Y IN T H E R E R E L A T IO N S H IP , W H O D IE D A T B IR T H IN 1 9 3 9 . M Y A U N T A N D H E R H U S B A N D N E V E R L IV E D T O G E T H E R , A N D H A D K E P T T H E IR M A R R IA G E A S H R O U D E D S E C R E T F R O M M Y G R E A T G R A N D M O T H E R A N N A M P U H L U N T IL H E R D E A T H IN 1 9 6 5 . A F T E R W H IC H , L U A N D H E R H U S B A N D C O N T IN U E D T O L IV E A P A R T O U T O F R E S P E C T T O H E R M O T H E R . T H IS S E C R E T W A S T O L D IN B IT S A N D P IE C E S A N D IS O L A T IO N . T H IS S E C R E T W A S P R E S U M E D Y E T R E M A IN E D U N K N O W N T H R O U G H O U T T H E F A M ILY2 4 F I R S T A I D A N D R E D C R O S S E P H E M E R A P R I N C I P L E S O F A B S T R A C T M A T H F O U N D A R T H I S T O R I C T Y P O G R A P H I C S A M P L E S M E T A P H O R I C A L P O E T R Y 0 1 D E C E M B E R 1 9 7 1 J O H N P A G E C O R R I G A N J O H - N P A -G E C O R - R I G -A N T H R O U G H S T O R IE S O F T E N T O L D B Y M Y G R E A T A U N T L U C IL L E , IT W A S R E V E A L E D T H A T F O R T H IR T Y Y E A R S S H E H A D B E E N S E C R E T L Y M A R R IE D . A U N T L U A N D H E R H U S B A N D J E F F H A D A C H IL D E A R L Y IN T H E R E R E L A T IO N S H IP , W H O D IE D A T B IR T H IN 1 9 3 9 . M Y A U N T A N D H E R H U S B A N D N E V E R L IV E D T O G E T H E R , A N D H A D K E P T T H E IR M A R R IA G E A S H R O U D E D S E C R E T F R O M M Y G R E A T G R A N D M O T H E R A N N A M P U H L U N T IL H E R D E A T H IN 1 9 6 5 . A F T E R W H IC H , L U A N D H E R H U S B A N D C O N T IN U E D T O L IV E A P A R T O U T O F R E S P E C T T O H E R M O T H E R . T H IS S E C R E T W A S T O L D IN B IT S A N D P IE C E S A N D IS O L A T IO N . T H IS S E C R E T W A S P R E S U M E D Y E T R E M A IN E D U N K N O W N T H R O U G H O U T T H E 2 F I R S T A I D A N D R E D C R O S S E P H E M E R A P R I N C I P L E S O F A B S T R A C T M A T H F O U N D A R T H I S T O R I C T Y P O G R A P H I C S A M P L E S M E T A P H O R I C A L P O E T R Y 01 D EC EM B ER 1971 Five of five Four of five HIGH CONTRAST TYPOGRAPHIC HIERARCHY STUDIES HIGH CONTRAST LAYERING HIERARCHY Graphic Design: The New Basics
  • | 71 Digital typeface design based on letterforms drawn with a small stick. The collection consists of both upper case letters and low case along with two alternate sets of numbers. Typeface design rendered from a widely used Dutch typeface used primarily for book design. PROJECT SUMMARY PROJECT SUMMARY PEPA STICK DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN SÓLINN DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN TYPE SPECIMEN from the collection Critters HALL OF FAME: 9:28 -Medical assist with subject who had been run over by a cow on East St. south. from the collection "It Was Nothing": 10:07 - Caller reports she's following a gray Ford Taurus through town that's driving real slow and ran a red light… While on the line, the subject in the Taurus called 911 stating someone has been following him since he got to town; officer arrived on the scene at that time, everything okay. TYPE SPECIMEN
  • 73 | Capital only typeface design based on letterforms from a plastic stencil kit that had been worn down and worn out through its years of usage Typeface design rendered from a single stroke in font creation software. PROJECT SUMMARY PROJECT SUMMARY PEPA STICK DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN SWANNY DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN TYPE SPECIMEN 11:16 P.M. - WOMAN CALLED 911 TO REPORT DOMESTIC PROB- LEM, THEN SAID SHE DID NOT WANT OFFICERS TO RESPOND; RELAYED TO GRINNELL POLICE WHO RE- PORT COUPLE HAVING A DISAGREEMENT, NO AS- SAULT, JUST VERBAL. 1:22 A.M. - MALE HALF OF PREVIOUS DIS- PUTE CALLS 911 TO REPORT DOMES- TIC PROBLEM: SAYS FEMALE HALF IS THROWING HIS STUFF INTO THE STREET AND FRONT YARD; MALE HALF IS IN- TOXICATED, NO SIGNS HIS STUFF WAS THROWN OUT LIKE HE SAID. FROM THE COLLECTION -DRUNK: TYPE SPECIMEN
  • 75 | FROM THE COLLECTION “WTF”: 5:15- Female got hand stuck in couch, 400 block East. from the collection “It Was Aliens”:4:39 a.m. - suspicious vehicle, 1700 block of Spring: vehicle in the drive,lights kept going on and off; thought to be a relative from out of town; lights kept flashing, turned red and spun rapidly; vehicle lifted slowly above 1700 Spring, vanished; turned out to be relatives from Outer Space. Type designs using monoweight stoke aligned around tightly packed set of squares. Tightly geometric typeface constructed to a grid of squares. PROJECT SUMMARY PROJECT SUMMARY TRACTION OVERHEAD-Light DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN TRACTION OVERHEAD-Normal DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN TYPE SPECIMEN TYPE SPECIMEN
  • 77 | FROM THE COLLECTION MISC.: 4:41 - CRIMINAL MISCHIEF: REPORT OF WATER FOUNTAIN BROKEN AT CENTRAL PARK; CHECKED AND WAS UNABLE TO LOCATE, POSSIBLY AT MERRILL, SEE OTHER ENTRY. 4:45 - CRIMINAL MISCHIEF: REPORT OF DRINKING FOUNTAIN BROKEN AND SPRAYING WATER AT MERRILL PARK.@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Two digital typeface designs based on illuminated bank marquees. Each letter is drawn from outlined or filled circles set to a modular proportion ratio Modular typeface design rendered from four repeated, rotated, and multiplied graphic elements PROJECT SUMMARY PROJECT SUMMARY BANK BULBS and FAST BANK DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN GLEN BURNIE DIGITAL TYPEFACE DESIGN TYPE SPECIMENTYPE SPECIMEN
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 79 Pepa Stick Swanny Vinyl Sólinn Bank Bulbs, Fast Bank Digital Type Design Pepa Stick ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstvwxyz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 @ ¡ ™ £ ¢ ∞ § ¶ • ª º 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 VINYLABCDEeFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 SólinnABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstvwxyz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 @BANK BULBS NC@FASTBANK ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) < > . , / ? " : ; Etching CAPS Traction Overhead_Light Traction Overhead_Normal Glen Burnie Sovada (numerals Only) NovaClutch // Typographic Annex Typeface Collection ETCHING CAPS ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 TRACTION OVERHEAD ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 TRACTION OVERHEADABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 SOVADA NUMERALS ONLY 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 LIGHT NORMAL
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 81 This grouping of studies examine the comparative visual properties of a given set of two texts. Using a flexible grid and layering techniques the task was to create subtle hierarchy shifts allowing each parts of the text to be illuminated. A designer’s approach to visual hierarchy reflects his or her personal style, methodology, and training as well as the zeitgeist of the period. Hierarchy can be simple or complex, rigorous or loose, flat or highly articulated. Regardless of approach, hierarchy employs clear (and in some cases subtle) marks of separation to signal a change from one level to another. This grouping of studies was originally prepared for the Hierarchy chapter of the MICA GDMFA studio publication, Graphic Design: The New Basics, edited by program director Ellen Lupton and published by Princeton Architectural Press. The purpose of the book was to reexamine formal aspects of contemporary design and create a guide to basic design principles. SUBTLE CONTRAST GRID SYSTEMS LAYERING HIERARCHY SUBTLE HIERARCHY STUDIES Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he won- dered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. As he spent more time with the men, Alsop began to feel that prison was molding them to prison life, not the life they would one day lead beyond the prison walls. It was conditioning them to live like animals. Design could do something about that, he thought—and without turning cell blocks into boutique hotels. Instead of a traditional sprawl- ing plan, he imagined the blocks as narrow towers, which would free up space for working gardens, where inmates could get job training.The inmates were also interested in construction and food service, so Alsop set aside space Posted July 17, 2006 By Douglas McGray Will Alsop rethinks prisons— with the help of the inmates. Behind the Bars Metropolis Observed on the grounds for building sites and added a restaurant, a low-power radio station, and a barber shop. As Alsop facilitated, the men found they had more and more to say. Exposed toilets were dehumanizing, they argued (and the guards agreed). Many of them had families who traveled long distances to visit, but they had nowhere to stay. Inmates wished they could lock their own cell doors—not from guards but from other inmates. Alsop suggested doors that lock from the inside and a small prison hotel, and pondered ways to give prison- ers more privacy in the john without compromising secu- rity. “This is the way all things should be designed,” he explains. “It’s not about me being some maestro architect and saying whatever I’ve designed is good for you.” Most radically he abandoned massive cell blocks, replacing them with units to house no more than 14 prisoners, which he believes could encourage a sense of community. While the final product is just a design study—on display beginning in September at the Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes, simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fight- ing the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax…What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I Urban Journal By Kristi Cameron Two Modern homes with vastly different personalities show that a lot can be made of a simple rectangle. Accommodating SpacesPosted September 6, 2006 hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. The architect confined the interior functions to a central wall that holds two bathrooms, the kitchen, utilities, and a fireplace. Because he made it of beautiful (and costly) primavera wood, Mies avoided cutting any holes or inserting any hardware into it, hiding schloss hinges behind the doors and positioning electrical outlets in the marble floor. By radically reducing interior walls and all but eliminating the vertical steel structure, Mies produced the perfect platform for experiencing the surrounding landscape.To be fair, Farnsworth knew exactly what she was getting (as a photo of her studying the plans confirms), and the house was strictly designed to be a summer residence, not for full-time occupancy. Even though she had to fight for some essential concessions—for example, a wardrobe for storing personal effects; Mies only wanted to give her a single hanger in the bathroom for her clothes- Farnsworth did keep and use the house until 1972, when a noisy highway was built nearby and she sold it to Lord Peter Palumbo. Impossible in an urban context, the Farnsworth House was an experiment in transparency—and perhaps the greatest artistic achievement in minimalist architecture. Yet as the saying goes: It’s a nice place to visit…. Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. As he spent more time with the men, Alsop began to feel that prison was molding them to prison life, not the life they would one day lead beyond the prison walls. It was conditioning them to live like animals. Design could do something about that, he thought—and without turning cell blocks into boutique hotels. Instead of a traditional sprawling plan, he imagined the blocks as narrow towers, which would free up space for working gardens, where inmates could get job training. The inmates were also interested in construction and food service, so Alsop set aside space on the grounds for building sites and added a restaurant, a low-power radio station, and a barber shop. As Alsop facilitated, the men found they had more and more to say. Exposed toilets were dehumanizing, they argued (and the guards agreed). Many of them had families who traveled long distances to visit, but they had nowhere to stay. Inmates wished they could lock their own cell doors—not from guards but from other inmates. Alsop suggested doors that lock from the inside and a small prison hotel, and pondered ways to give prisoners more privacy in the john without compromising security. “This is the way all things should be designed,” he explains. “It’s not about me being some maestro architect and saying whatever I’ve designed is good for you.” Most radically he abandoned massive cell blocks, replacing them with units to house no more than 14 prisoners, which he Posted July 17, 2006 Will Alsop rethinks prisons — with the help of the inmates. By Douglas McGray Behind The Bars Metropolis Observed Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes, simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax…What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. The architect confined the interior functions to a central wall that holds two bathrooms, the kitchen, utilities, and a fireplace. Because he made it of beautiful (and costly) primavera wood, Mies avoided cutting any holes or inserting any hardware into it, hiding schloss hinges behind the doors and positioning electrical outlets in the marble floor. By radically reducing interior walls and all but eliminating the vertical steel structure, Mies produced the perfect platform for experiencing the surrounding landscape. To be fair, Farnsworth knew exactly what she was getting (as a photo of her studying the plans confirms), and the house was strictly designed to be a summer residence, not for full-time occupancy. Even though she had to fight for some essential concessions—for example, a wardrobe for storing personal effects; Mies only wanted to give her a single hanger in the bathroom for her clothes—Farnsworth did keep and use the house until 1972, when a noisy highway was built nearby and she sold it to Lord Peter Palumbo. Impossible in an urban context, the Farnsworth House was an experiment in transparency—and perhaps the greatest artistic achievement in minimalist architecture.Yet as the saying goes: It’s a nice place to visit…. While Hanne Kjærholm’s intentions for her family home were much less lofty, her design is no less purposeful. One of the first things she said about the house was that we should take photos from down low, as the cozy space (the ceilings can’t be more than eight feet high) is meant to be experienced from a seated position. And while the Farnsworth house propels your attention outward, the Kjærholm house wraps itself around you. Here, the wood walls are made of humble, untreated pine—and rather than being left reverently bare, they are hung with personal items throughout.The room that now serves as Kjærholm’s office has a collection of global sandals mounted in long rows.The three sides of the house that face land and are surrounded by neighboring structures have relatively modest windows, hung closer to the ground than the ceiling. Only the fourth, water-facing wall is entirely glass.The family had both privacy and an optimal view of the natural surroundings.Though Kjærholm did not design her own door handles as Mies had, she did give them careful consideration, selecting a model intended for ships.Tactile Haitian straw mats (the third set in 24 years) cover the floors.The bedroom was formerly subdivided into a studio by a storage wall of Kjærholm’s design; a pale mark is still visible where the sliding wall was once positioned.This compact house allowed for a great deal of flexibility as the family’s circumstances changed. They are two simple rectangles housing wholly dissimilar programs.The first—a spot for a single woman to escape to on weekends to pursue peaceful interests like poetry and music—was more suited to architectural experimentation, while the second had to accommodate the unpredictable, evolving, and very real demands of a family. With such different purposes any comparisons of the Farnsworth and Kjærholm houses is ultimately unfair, other than to conclude that though Modernism has popularly been deemed unlivable there’s no reason it has to be. Urban Journal By Kristi Cameron Two Modern homes with vastly different personalities show that a lot can be made of a simple rectangle. Accommodating Spaces Posted September 6, 2006 Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. As he spent more time with the men, Alsop began to feel that prison was molding them to prison life, not the life they would one day lead beyond the prison walls. It was conditioning them to live like animals. Design could do something about that, he thought- and without turning cell blocks into boutique hotels. Instead of a traditional sprawling plan, he imagined the blocks as narrow towers, which would free up space for working gardens, where inmates could get job training.The inmates were also interested in construction and food service, so Alsop set aside space on the grounds for building sites and added a restaurant, a low-power radio station, and a barber shop. As Alsop facilitated, the men found they had more and more to say. Exposed toilets were dehumanizing, they argued (and the guards agreed). Many of them had families who traveled long distances to visit, but they had nowhere to stay. Inmates wished they could lock their own cell doors—not from guards but from other inmates. Alsop suggested doors that lock from the inside and a small prison hotel, and pondered ways to give prisoners more privacy in the john without compromising security. “This is the way all things should be designed,” he explains. “It’s not about me being some maestro architect and saying whatever I’ve designed is good for you.” Most radically he abandoned massive cell blocks, replacing them with units to house no more than 14 prisoners, which he believes could encourage a sense of community. While the final product is just a design study—on display beginning in September at the National Centre for Citizenship & Law Galleries of Justice, in Nottingham—British prison officials have already approached Alsop and Rideout for further thoughts on the idea. “We haven’t Posted July 17, 2006 By Douglas McGray Will Alsop rethinks prisons — with the help of the inmates. Behind the Bars Metropolis Observed Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes, simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, com- plained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax…What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. The architect confined the interior functions to a central wall that holds two bath- rooms, the kitchen, utilities, and a fireplace. Because he made it of beautiful (and costly) primavera wood, Mies Urban Journal By Kristi Cameron Two Modern homes with vastly different personalities show that a lot can be made of a simple rectangle. Accommodating Spaces Posted September 6, 2006 POSTED JULY 17, 2006 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. DOUGLAS McGRAY BEHIND THE BARS METROPOLIS OBSERVED Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? URBAN JOURNAL BY KRISTI CAMERON POSTED SEPTEMBER 6, 2006 Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes,simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax…What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the ACCOMMODATING SPACES TWO MODERN HOMES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES SHOW THAT A LOT CAN BE MADE OF A SIMPLE RECTANGLE Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes, simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Co- penhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innova- tions and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax...What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transpar- ent, like an X-ray. TWO MODERN HOMES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES SHOW THAT A LOT CAN BE MADE OF A SIMPLE RECTANGLE ACCOMMODATING SPACES BY KRISTI CAMERON URBAN JOURNAL POSTED SEPTEMBER 6, 2006 Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; com- munities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. BEHIND THE BARS BY DOUGLAS McGRAY METROPOLIS OBSERVED POSTED JULY 17, 2006 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. POSTED JULY 17, 2006 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. BY DOUGLAS McGRAY BEHIND THE BARS METROPOLIS OBSERVED Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked URBAN JOURNAL B Y K R I S T I C A M E R O N TWO MODERN HOMES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES SHOW THAT A LOT CAN BE MADE OF A SIMPLE RECTANGLE. A C C O M M O D A T I N G S P A C E S POSTED SEPTEMBER 6, 2006 Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes,simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax…What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. The architect confined the interior functions to a central wall that holds two bathrooms, the kitchen, utilities, and a fireplace. Because he made it of beautiful (and costly) primavera wood, Mies avoided cutting any holes or inserting any hardware into it, hiding schloss hinges behind the doors and positioning electrical outlets in the marble floor. By radically reducing interior walls and all but eliminating the vertical steel structure, Mies produced the perfect platform for experiencing the surrounding landscape. To be fair, Farnsworth knew exactly what she was getting (as a photo of her studying the plans confirms), and the house was strictly designed to be a summer residence, not for full-time occupancy. Even though she had to fight for some essential concessions—for example, a wardrobe for storing personal effects; Mies only wanted to give her a single hanger in the bathroom for her clothes—Farnsworth did keep and use the house until 1972, when a noisy highway was built nearby and she sold it to Lord Peter Palumbo. Impossible in an urban context, the Farnsworth House was POSTED JULY 17, 2006 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. BY DOUGLAS McGRAY BEHIND THE BARS METROPOLIS OBSERVED Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. C o r r e c t i o n s a g e n c i e s w a n t t h e c h e a p e s t c a g e t h e y c a n b u y ; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. As he spent more time with the men, Alsop began to feel that prison was molding them to prison life, not the life they would one day lead beyond the prison walls. It was conditioning them to live like animals. Design could do something about that, he thought—and without turning cell blocks into boutique hotels. Instead of a traditional sprawling plan, he imagined the blocks as narrow towers, URBAN JOURNAL BY KRISTI CAMERON TWO MODERN HOMES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES SHOW THAT A LOT CAN BE MADE OF A SIMPLE RECTANGLE. ACCOMMODATING SPACES POSTED SEPTEMBER 6, 2006 Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes,simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax…What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. The architect confined the interior functions to a central wall that holds two bathrooms, the kitchen, utilities, and a fireplace. Because he made it of beautiful (and costly) primavera wood, Mies avoided cutting any holes or inserting any hardware into it, hiding schloss hinges behind the doors and positioning electrical outlets in the marble floor. By radically reducing interior walls and all but eliminating the vertical steel structure, Mies produced the perfect platform for experiencing the surrounding landscape. To be fair, Farnsworth knew exactly what she was getting (as a photo of her studying the plans confirms), and the house was strictly designed to be a summer residence, not for full-time occupancy. Even though she had to fight for some essential concessions—for example, a wardrobe for storing personal effects; Mies only wanted to give her a single hanger in the bathroom for her clothes—Farnsworth did keep and use the house until 1972, when a noisy highway was built nearby and she sold it to Lord Peter Palumbo. Impossible in an urban context, the Farnsworth House was an experiment in transparency—and perhaps the greatest artistic achievement in minimalist architecture. Yet as the saying goes: It’s a nice place to visit…. While Hanne Kjærholm’s intentions for her family home were much less lofty, her design is no less purposeful. Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes,simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chi- cago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on dis- play; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax...What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. TWO MODERN HOMES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES SHOW THAT A LOT CAN BE MADE OF A SIMPLE RECTANGLE ACCOMMODATING SPACES BY KRISTI CAMERON URBAN JOURNAL POSTED SEPTEMBER 6, 2006 Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; com- munities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. BEHIND THE BARS BY DOUGLAS McGRAY METROPOLIS OBSERVED POSTED JULY 17, 2006 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes, simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visiting Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and incorporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but com- pare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farn- sworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax...What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the road on the way in here and the can would spoil the appearance of the whole house. So I hide it in the closet further down from the sink. Mies talks about “free space”: but his space is very fixed. I can’t even put a clothes hanger in my house without considering how it affects everything from outside. Any arrangement of furniture becomes a major problem, because the house is transparent, like an X-ray. The architect confined the interior functions to a central wall that holds two bathrooms, the kitchen, utilities, and a fireplace. Because he made it of beautiful (and costly) primavera wood, Mies avoided cutting any holes or inserting any hardware into it, hiding schloss hinges behind the doors and positioning electrical outlets in the marble floor. By radically reducing interior walls and all but eliminating the vertical steel structure, Mies produced the perfect platform for experiencing the surrounding landscape. To be fair, Farnsworth knew exactly what she was getting (as a photo of her studying the plans confirms), and the house was strictly designed to be a summer residence, not for full-time occupancy. Even though she had to fight for some essential concessions—for example, a wardrobe for storing personal effects; Mies only wanted to give her a single hanger in the bathroom for her clothes—Farnsworth did keep and use the house until 1972, when a noisy highway was built nearby and she sold it to Lord Peter Palumbo. Impossible in an urban context, the Farnsworth House was an experiment in transparency—and perhaps the greatest artistic achievement in minimalist architecture. Yet as the saying goes: It’s a nice place to visit.... T W O M O D E R N H O M E S W I T H V A S T L Y D I F F E R E N T P E R S O N A L I T I E S A C C O M M O D A T - I N G S P A C E S B Y K R I S T I C A M E R - O N U R B A N J O U R N A L P O S T E D S E P T E M B E R 6 , 2 0 0 6 Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheap- est cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) approached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Al- sop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Even- tually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. As he spent more time with the men, Alsop began to feel that prison was molding them to prison life, not the life they would one day lead beyond the prison walls. It was conditioning them to live like animals. Design could do something about that, he thought—and without turning cell blocks into boutique hotels. B E H I N D T H E B A R S B Y D O U G L A S M c G R A Y M E T R O P O L I S O B S E R V E D P O S T E D J U L Y 1 7 , 2 0 0 6 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. GRAPHIC DESIGN: THE NEW BASICS
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 83 Modern houses are often dismissed as little more than boxes, simple to the point of sacrifice. But as recent back-to-back trips to Chicago and Copenhagen underscored, a lot can be done architecturally with a box. It was purely chance that I ended up visit- ing Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (1951) a couple of weeks before Hanne Kjærholm gave me a tour of the 1962 home that she designed for herself, her husband Poul, and their children. Aside from a few superficial similarities—the first is situated on the Fox River, the latter on the Oresund; both feature structural innovations and in- corporate elements meant for other applications—the two have little in common. Still, I couldn’t help but compare them, particularly how they accommodate life within the box. Mies’s relationship with his client famously soured toward the end, and though he meant to design the house’s interiors, he never had that chance. Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the Chicago physician who commissioned the weekend house in Plano, Illinois, complained about feeling on display; she felt like she was fighting the structure: The truth is that in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert. I am always restless. Even in the evening. I feel like a sentinel on guard day and night. I can rarely stretch out and relax...What else? I don’t keep garbage under my sink. Do you know why? Because you can see the whole “kitchen” from the TWO MODERN HOMES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES SHOW THAT A LOT CAN BE MADE OF A SIMPLE RECTANGLE ACCOMMODATING SPACES BY KRISTI CAMERON URBAN JOURNAL POSTED SEPTEMBER 6, 2006 Prison design is about as unglamorous as architecture can get. Corrections agencies want the cheapest cage they can buy; communities want the monstrosities out of sight. Innovation has typically meant anything that will cut costs—for instance, casting an entire prefabricated cell, from the bed frame to the toilet, as a single piece of low-grade concrete. But when British nonprofit Rideout (Creative Arts for Rehabilitation) ap- proached the architect Will Alsop about designing a concept prison—from the inside out—he jumped at the chance. If prisons are meant to make troubled men and women into citizens, he wondered, might there be a social cost to bad prison design? On Alsop’s first trip behind bars, he passed around wide sheets of butcher paper to a group of inmates, all of them in for at least 15 years, and asked them to draw a new prison cell. What happened next shocked him: they drew the cells they had. A decade or more of life in prison made it difficult to imagine any change in space or routine. “They said, It would be too expensive to give us more space,” Alsop recalls. “Perhaps it’s more expensive for society not to give you a larger space,” he responded. Eventually Alsop scrapped the idea of floor plans and asked them instead to draw the view from an imaginary cell. All at once the men began to draw gardens. In prison, they explained, there is time to watch things grow. Incarceration had not simply rewired their ideas about space, Alsop realized, it had also warped their sense of time. As he spent more time with the men, Alsop began to feel that prison was molding them to prison life, not the life they would one day lead beyond the prison walls. It was conditioning them to live like animals. Design could do something about that, he thought—and without turn- ing cell blocks into boutique hotels. Instead of a traditional sprawling plan, he imagined the blocks as narrow towers, which would free up space for working gardens, where inmates could get job training. The inmates were also interested in construction and food service, so Alsop set aside space on the grounds for building sites and added a restaurant, a low-power radio station, and a barber shop. As Alsop facilitated, the men found they had more and more to say. Exposed toilets were dehumanizing, they argued (and the guards agreed). Many of them had families who traveled long distances to visit, but they had nowhere to stay. Inmates wished they could lock their own cell doors—not from guards but from other inmates. Alsop suggested doors that lock from the inside and a small prison hotel, and pondered ways to give prisoners more privacy in the john without compromising security. “This is the way all things should be designed,” he explains. “It’s not about me being some maestro architect and saying whatever I’ve designed is good for you.” BEHIND THE BARS B Y DOUGLAS McGRAY METROPOLIS OBSERVED POSTED JULY 17, 2006 WILL ALSOP RETHINKS PRISONS — WITH THE HELP OF THE INMATES. SUBTLE CONTRAST GRID SYSTEMS LAYERING HIERARCHY SUBTLE HIERARCHY STUDIES GRAPHIC DESIGN: THE NEW BASICS
  • ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ + ++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++ SECTION THREE SIGNAGE III) Implementation and Supervision is the phase when the production of camera- ready artwork or adjustments to disk art, photography, and illustration are done. Artwork will be prepared clearly and accurately for maximum efficiency in the printing process. Final production will be discussed with the client and production considerations handled. At the conclusion of this phase, all final artwork-scans, photography, or illustration-will be approved by the client and sent to the printer for reproduction. Alterations or corrections can still be made, however, changes at this stage are expensive and will delay final delivery. |
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 87 Applied logo to exterior building graphics and re-designed interior creating a cleaner and tighter space. Incorporated building tenants graphic identities into exterior signage, to apply a cohesive building system. BOB’S JAVA HUT PROJECT SUMMARY EXTERIOR SIGNAGE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN Designed new logo in reference to old vintage car mechanics painted signage. Advertising and marketing material for City Pages, and the Minnesota Motorcycle Monthly.
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 89 BEYOND THE COMPASS BEYOND THE SQUARE EXHIBITION BANNER 14FT. X 19FT. WALTERS ART MUSEUM Charles Street Entrance 2007-2008 EXHIBITION DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR Banner Specifications and Construction. Banner Construction •“Charles Street Banner” • 4/color Vinyl Banner •Size: 14’9’’ x 17’9’’ •Single Sided, hangs against a building wall •Grommets evenly spaced across the top •Close to edge to take “S” hooks, about 1/2" opening Grommets across bottom and up each side 17’9’’ 14 ’9’’ Final artwork 25% Scale 1:4 “Charles Street Banner” • 4/color Vinyl Banner •Size: 14’9’’ x 17’9’’ •Single Sided, hangs against a building wall •No Air vents •7 Grommets evenly spaced across the top of banner •3 Grommets evenly spaced across bottom •3 Grommets up each side so banner can be attached to vertical wires with “S” hooks and pulled taunt. Final artwork 25% Scale 1:4
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 91 BYERLY’S Minnesota Grille Signage Designed Byerly’s Minnesota Grille logo, 2001 Applied logo as restaurant signage LUND FOOD HOLDINGS DESIGN OFFICE: bamboo, Minneapolis MINNESOTA GRILLE EST.1968 MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA U.S.A.
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 93 BYERLY’S Minnesota Grille Menu Design Breakfast and dinner menu for Byerly’s Minnesota Grille. Menu page spreads. Front and back cover, pages 2-7 LUND FOOD HOLDINGS DESIGN OFFICE: bamboo, Minneapolis
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 95 Menu design was intended to reference a city newspaper, with captions and headlines to historically document each store, and when it opened. BYERLY’S Minnesota Grille Menu Design Breakfast and dinner menu for Byerly’s Minnesota Grille. LUND FOOD HOLDINGS DESIGN OFFICE: bamboo, Minneapolis
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 97 HISTORIC LEITHAUSER LOFTS CONDOMINIUMS Designed large format, 4’x 6’ site signs Michlitsch Builders, Inc. Marketing and informational site signage, City of St. Paul development sign, 2005
  • | 99 PROJECT SUMMARY PROJECT SUMMARY EUROPINE IMPORTS Store signage, consisting of back-lit dimensional boxes, as well as vinyl graphics of service categories Signage Seasonal marketing postcards, distributed from mailing list and customer inquiries 2006 Minneapolis St Paul Magazine, March Home and Garden, 1/2 Vert. AdSpace CALL 952.929.2927 Hours: Mon–Sat 10–6 4414 Excelsior Blvd, Mpls (1/2 Mile East of Highway 100) I N T E R I O R D E S I G N L E AT H E R E U R O P E A N A N T I Q U E S U P H O L S T E RY C A B I N TA B L E S A C C E S S O R I E S R E P R O D U C T I O N C H A I R S A DIRECT IMPORTER OF EUROPEAN ANTIQUES WITH HOME FURNISHINGS AND ACCESSORIES P R E S E N T T H I S C O U P O N B E F O R E M AY 0 1 , 2 0 0 6 T O R E C E I V E 20%OFFA N Y R E G U L A R P R I C E D I T E M 15%OFFA N Y S P E C I A L O R D E R D I S C O U N T E X C L U D E S S A L E A N D C L E A R A N C E I T E M S EUROPINE IMPORTS Marketing Collateral
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 101 Cr(EAT)e caters 1121 THE DINING STUDIO C A T E R I N G & C O N S U L T I N G H AN D CRAF TED CU I SI N E THE DINING STUDIO C A T E R I N G & C O N S U L T I N G TH E DI N I N G STU DI O Signage sketch Signage Established logo and identity system for Cr(eat)e Catering and the Dining Studio for Chef Philip Dorwart T H E DIN IN G ST U DIO C A T E R I N G & C O N S U L T I N G T H E DIN IN G ST U DIO C A T E R I N G & C O N S U L T I N G THE DINING STUDIO HAND CRAFTED CUISINE Cr(eat)e, The Dining Studio logo Cr(eat)e caters logo Side by side banner graphics. Logo DesignPROJECT SUMMARY
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 103 BALTIMORE URBAN FOREST BANNER With growing concerns and environmental calls for action, the green roof has become a top topic as a potential and desirable vehicle for change. With the urban landscape of Baltimore made up of downtown, and surrounding neighborhoods, each has the potential to clad row houses with green roofs to prevent rain run off into the Chesapeake Bay. Similarly large corporate institutions have also begun to look at the long term feasibility of capping their rooftops with cost effective green roofs. Graphically, I wanted the tree canopy to be represented as a burst similar to familiar sun and solar motifs. The bland non–specific city scape acts as the strong, stoic trunk and root systems. My approach to Urban Forest looks at the general characteristics of a cityscape–with green tops, the natural opposition to urban blacktop. URBAN FOREST SUBMISSION AND INSTALLATION Banner proposal, sponsorship, and installation Location: Area D, Druid Park Lake Drive
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 105 Event graphics; banners and catalogue for WB International Awards Ceremony WORLD BANK AWARDS CEREMONY DESIGN OFFICE: CKS Washington D.C. 1997 Nomination Awards Ceremony publication brochure World Bank Nomination Awards For Excellence Ceremony event graphics and publication brochure
  • | PROJECT SUMMARY 107 DIMENSIONAL TYPOGRAPHY Dimensional type study examining quantitative information graphic application to three dimensional structure reinforcing its content INFORMATION GRAPHICS DIMENSIONAL TYPE HIERARCHY STUDY
  • ++++++++ ++++++++ ++++++++ ++++++++ ++++++++ + ++++ ++++++++ + ++++ ++++++++ ++++++++ SECTION FOUR BOOK + PUBLICATION DESIGN PORTFOLIO WORK SAMPLES CASE STUDY FACSIMILE |
  • | 111 THE FLAMINGOS’ SOCKS Horacio Quiroga’s fable 1 2 5 6 9 GRAFT SPRING 2008 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. 2. 3. 4. 9. 10. 5. 6. 11. 7. 12. 13. 18. 14. 15. 19. 20. 16. 17. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 3 7 8 END 4 Work created for visiting artists Steven Farrell, project involved grafting a fable with a non-related knowledge domain, recreating a secondary narrative structure where the narrative arch, and domain are both visible.
  • | 113 GRAPHIC EXPRESSION OF INTERNMENT This graduate thesis looks to infuse graphic design, historical analysis, and curated subject matter in a self published book form. This research heavy thesis similarly looks to use my unique design sensibility to study a form of designed objects introducing them to a previously negated field of design history. My aim was to study/uncover works created by Jews during World War II beyond Holocaust studies. Initial research revealed a negation of WW II designed artifacts and an even larger absence of work created by Jews during the war years. The goal of this research is to illuminate the contents and the importance of the graphic medium while allowing the contents to present its self with room for interpretation. With this, I ask that further questions arise that can be expounded on. This is the medium of Holocaust studies—question, counter question. While each of the three albums illuminate similar themes of the Holocaust such as: remembrance, bearing witness, dedication, memorial, and renewal, they each represent experience in diverse manifestations. Each album produced for specific communities documents an optimistic view, defiant of the experience of camp life. Unlike clandestine works documenting hardship or perseverance, these albums provide insightful awareness to the personalized characteristic in each ‘internment’ camp. PROJECT SUMMARY MFA GRADUATE THESIS BOOK Sample spreads from graduate thesis book GRAPHIC EXPRESSION OF INTERNMENT; presenting historic design analysis of three photo albums from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
  • VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA HISTORIC VISUAL SURVEY John P Corrigan GD///MFA AH5622 Visual Culture and the Holocaust Jennifer Hirsh Spring 2007 Fight for Freedom logo, a British anti- Nazi campaign, c. 1941. 1 2 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 3 Social and political reasoning uses predetermined national security to defend its position against European Jewry. Historic animosity, paranoia, and social fatigue led to false defensive actions against the Jews. Wrongful blame, according to socialist doctrines, both accelerated and intensified after the out come and Germany’s Nationalist position after World War I. The undercurrent attitudes,extended anti-Semitic ideologies dating back to Martin Luther’s protestant reformation,and the events and circumstances surrounding the French inquisition.The predominant historic attitudes of European citizens continually resented the Jewish communities wealth and supposed economic influences.European Jewry previously had been denied land ownership rights in Russia,France,Germany,and England.This political and economic restriction forced the International Jewish Diaspora to turn inward,relying on the extension of community and its cross-cultural connections incorporating academia,and the trade and distribution of marketable goods. Jewish national identity has continually focused on their biblical Holy Land of the‘Chosen People,’Palestine,Israel and the city of Jerusalem.This affection continued to provide them with a strong emotional and national pride.A people without land to claim as their own,left Jews around the world to identify first with religious conviction, and secondly with their national/state of occupancies.This conviction,to the ideological state of Israel,considered by residential communities to represent a lack of National pride in the host country,such as Germany,Italy,Poland,Bohemia,the Ukraine,Russia, and the Balkan States.This apparent and deliberate lack of National pride provoked citizens and wrongfully encouraged ideologies of mistrust,questioned solidarity, paranoid rumors of espionage,and undercurrents of potential revolutionaries. National pride of European nations intensified after the Great War.Germany suffered great losses after the fall of World War I.Germany was severely severed and fractured in social and economic depression.Germany looked to their National identity and government for answers as to the demise of their once powerful nation.The National Socialist party looked to answer these questions,ending blame on the Jews. INTRODUCTION ANTI-SEMITISM LEADING TO THE HOLOCAUST 3 The Wandering Jew (The Eternal Jew) Der-Ewige-Jude, Poster design by Horst Schlüter.1937. (Aynsley, 197) Even though the headline text is in German, the type is stylized into Hebrew letter forms. The text reads from left to right, where as Hebrew is written and reads from right to left. The image of the Jewish figure is distortingly hunched, and facial gesture have been exaggerated. The figure also carries a stone portion representing a broken fragmented Russia. 1933 JANUARY German government takes away freedom of speech, assembly, press, and freedom from invasion of privacy (mail, telephone, telegraph), and from house search without warrant. MARch The concentration camp at Dachau is established. JUlY Nazis pass a law requiring the forced sterilization of those found to have genetic defects. SepteMbeR German Jews are forbidden from owning land. OctObeR German Jews are forbidden from being newspaper editors. Timeline events focus on anti- Semitic legislation and actions directed by the Nazi regime. The film, The Wandering Jew, produced by Jewsih Zionists, was twisted by Nazi propagnda exploiting the Jewish quest for a return to Palestine. 10 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 11 Jeffery Herf’s book,The Jewish Enemy,lays out specific accounts and historical facts that prove and identify Nazi propaganda to be falsely based,and politically skewed for public support.Herf’s specific numbers dramatically prove the ultimate purpose was to falsely convince its own party,as well as the German citizens the supposed power of International Jewry.Herf’s statistical information is based on the decreasing percentage of German Jews predating the Nazi regime.Herf’s figures state,“The percentage of Jews in the German population had declined from it’s peak of just over 1 percent in 1880 (under the Weimar Republic) to .76 percent in 1933…”Herf continues,“Out of all German Jews,160,000 or 32.1 percent,lived in Berlin,a fact of considerable importance for Joseph Goebbels before and after 1933.”(Herf,35) Previous anti-Semitic prejudices had limited Jewish professions.Jews had been mostly removed from political and civil service.Jews were not allowed to participate,nor be the head of large corporate business.Herf states, “Almost three-quarters of German Jews made their living from trade,commerce,or banking,with strong concentrations in sales,white-collar jobs,and office work.”(Herf, 35) Remaining professions was law and medicine,which remained accessible for Jews to practice. Anti-Semitic propaganda made unsubstantiated claims the Jews dominated both the cultural and intellectuals of Berlin.These numbers were highly dramatized as less than an average of six percent occupied positions of notable influence.The less than consistent positioning of the Nazis regime conspiratorial claims of Jewish involvement was fictitious. Under the sanctioned Nuremburg laws,which eliminated both economic and social standing for the Jews,continued deception strengthened the Germans disgust of the Jews supposed power.Herf writes,“By the end of 1933,37,000 of the 525,00 Jews in Germany had already left.”(Herf,37) From the onset of Hitler’s rise to power,his previous publication Mein Kampf, which was written from prison,did not obsessively discuss racial biology,consuming itself mostly with the affect International Jewry had on the economic depression that afflicted Germany after World War I.The Jews were enemies because of their supposed economic war,capitalism,and connection to the Bolshevik revolution started in Russia. Herf cites the continued pressure and activism in England and America towards Germany for the increasing anti-Semitic policies towards Jews and the conspiracy of International Jewry.Herf writes,“The source of tension was therefore foreign criticism of the regimes anti-Semitic policies,not the policies themselves…”(Herf,39) Joseph Goebbels,second in command to Nazi propaganda, frequently linked Bolshevism with Germany’s Jewish problem. Both Goebbels’and Hitler’s speeches would demonize the‘Judo- Marxist domination’in its westward expansion of Germany,and the Jewish quest for world domination.Hitler’s hatred of America was continually obsessed with its connections to supposed Jewish influences.Outspoken American politicians,against the Nazis in Germany,fueled Jewish implications.Herf states,that Nazis attacked F.D.Roosevelt’s New Deal,believing that it was common to National Socialism in its encouragement of Liberal Democracy,a strong state- hood and active public welfare system.Politics in America was propagated by the Nazis proof of its alleged Jewish manipulation. International outrage and criticisms of the Nazi policy of anti- Semitism,provoked Hitler to‘retaliate’against the Jews of Germany and later the rest of Europe.Seen as an act of Jewish aggression on Germany,Hitler enacted the anti-Jewish pogrom of November 1938,‘the night of broken glass’destroying Jewish business and synagogues,killing and beating of Jews,and subsequently sending many males to Dachau,at which time was a cap for prisoners of war. 1937 JANUARY German Jews are banned from many professional occupations including teaching Germans, accounting and dentistry. They are also denied tax reductions and child allowances. JUlY Many Jewish students are ordered to leave German schools and universities. NOveMbeR Jewish passports are declared invalid for foreign travel. QUESTIONING ANTI-SEMITIC REPRESENTATION / PROLIfERATION 12 The Wire Pullers: They Are Only Jews! Parole der Woshe, Reich Propaganda Directorate of the Nazi Party, 1942. (Herf, 153) The early use of photography put faces of the enemy for all passersby to see. 4 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 5 Nazi anti-Semitic propaganda presented Hitler and Germany as merely responding to political threats,initiatives,and injustices of others.Propaganda initiatives portrayed the Germans innocence, turning the power relationships of the Jews upside down.Hitler projected his own paranoia,twisting historical world events to make claims of the diabolical intentions of International,and world Jewry. Nazis projected blame onto the Jews at the outbreak of World War II.According to Hitler and the Nazi party,it was the Jews who had launched the war against Germany,thus compelling the Nazi party to retaliate. Germany would use propaganda tactics to contradict historical events,making simultaneous claims of a master race and world domination.With world domination,paranoia,and the self-pity of victimization,the Nazis used propaganda to convince themselves and the rest of the world that they were the victims.The Nazis believed they had uncovered deep secrets of modern history and politics.Through means of propaganda,the Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda (Reichsministerium für Volksaufklärung und Propaganda) was to educate the people,(Herf,6) of the‘true’realities. The mid-late 1930’s the political consensus led to the Nuremburg Race Laws.The newly enacted laws would deny citizen- ship,encourage economic impoverishment of Jews—the enemy to the sate and well being of Germany.Anti-Semitism rested on the belief that the Jews were a cohesive and politically active power that was seeking the destruction of Germany.Nazi propaganda insisted that the powerful autonomous entity of International Jewry controlled stooges and political accomplices who served their evil interests.An International Jewish political force was falsely exposed for effecting leaders in Great Britain,the Soviet Union (under the Bolsheviks,) and the United States.The Nazis made claims that Jews were masters of camouflage,able to unknowingly afflict its goals at the unsuspecting 654 The Wire Puller: Brain-and Manual Workers Vote for the People’s Bloc, Election poster, 1924. (Herf, 33) Behind the Enemy Powers: The Jew Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, by Hans Schweitzer, 1943. (Herf) Jewish Conspiracy against Europe, Reich Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda 1941. (Herf, 143) 1934 MAY German Jews are forbidden from receiving national health insurance. NAZI AGENDA Political posters from the begining of the Nazi regime, and through the end of the war, consistently depicted the Jewish man as the mastermind behind all oppositional politcal force. The caricature of the Jewish figure is consistenly positoned behinde, or above, symbols of industrial and politcal influence. These posters represent a ‘lurking’ Jew, controling the political relationships of Allied agreements between England, Russia and America. Nazi propaganda used sterotypical caricatures of the overweight British bourgeois and heavy forcefulness of the Jewish politican. Other Nazi sterotypes focused on religious Jews; these depictions exaggerated the beard, nose, ears, and lips in appoving facial gestures. The Nazis commonly depicted Jewish conspirators safely hidden away in the safety and luxury of influence in America or England. 6 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 7 Before the official beginning and declaration of war in 1939, propaganda had been used to propagate the new world order according to the Nazis,and vilify the enemy.The industrial revolution allowed the proliferation of posters,uniforms,street graphics and political banners en masse.The propaganda image both unified and identified political opponents giving faces to the enemies of the Reich, creating solidarity amongst leaders,followers,as well as the crushed opposition. Leadership figures embodied the power and ideology of Nazi Germany.For the first time,photographic representation allowed images of Hitler to become icons.(Hollis,108) Through photographic representation,the Jewish enemy would also be vilified.Jewish faces could also be used to identify,misrepresent,and exaggerate anti-Semitic stereotypes,to the disadvantage of the Jews. Direct photographic representation was better suited to symbolic representation of the power of the Nazi party,and expose and propagate the negative connotations of the Jews. Posters were used by the Nazi party to boost morale among its own,encourage war production,and dictate order to civilians.The modern medium of propaganda was able to overwhelm viewers. (Hollis,109) Posters effectiveness depended upon the images ability to communicate instantly and sub due the potential for reactionary thought or consequences. The statistical information offered by Jeffrey Herf,is a staggering account of propaganda activity.In the initial years of the war the Propaganda Ministry was responsible for 200,000 political meetings from September 1939 through October 1940,a staggering 29,674 slide show meetings consisting of nine productions,as nine to ten million saw the German Weekly Newsreel each week.Herf reports, “Text posters were printed in edition of 400,000-500,000 and picture posters numbering 300,000.By the end of 1940,700,000 photos of Germans.Nazi propaganda made its initial effort to expose,identify,and destroy the supposed goal of German annihilation.Hitler personally sought to exterminate the Jews before they were able to annihilate the contemporary German empire. Established decades prior to the Nazi party, The Protocols of Zion,popularized fictitious themes of Jewish conspiracy.Twisting historical events effecting German strength,The Protocols of Zion supposedly answered questions to policies that beleaguered Germany after World War I. THE CAMPAIGN’S ONLY RATIONALE wAS TO bLUNT THE SENSIbILITIES Of THE PEOPLE REGARDING THE CAMPAIGN Of PERSECUTION AND MURDER wHICH wAS bEING CARRIED OUT…THEY wERE NOT DESIGNED TO UNITE THE GERMAN PEOPLE IN THE wAR EffORT…SUb DUE ANY DOUbT…RACIAL PERSECUTION TO wHICH THE JEwS wERE TO bE SUbJECTED… 1935 MAY German Jews are forbidden from serving in the military. SepteMbeR The German government enacts the Nuremberg Laws— depriving German Jews of citizenship and fundamental rights. The Nazis intensify persecution of political dissenters and others considered “inferior,” including Gypsies, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and homosexuals. 1 1 “Judgement,” Trials of War criminals before the Nuremburg Military Tribunal (IMT), 14, 565-576. Otto Dietrich testified at the Nuremburg Military trial stating… (Herf, 23) Election poster, 1932. (Heller, 64) 8 All of Germany listens to the Führer with the People’s Receiver. Designed by Leonoid. 1936. (Aynsley, 179) 7 wAR AND PROPAGANDA The audience is directed at ‘the people’ of Germany, which refer to Aryan decendents. Both the visual tone and the language is set to Fraktur, calling on German Nationalism. 8 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 9 Hitler had been produced.Herf also specifies the color poster accompanying the film The Eternal Jew was 23,000.(Herf,59) By January 1941,Herf lists the Propaganda Ministry claims that,“more than seven million posters,two million pamphlets,sixty million periodicals and wall newspapers,an sixty-seven million leaflets were produced.”(Herf,34) This amount does not reflect film,demonstrations,slide shows,or political rallies.The quantitative mass was pre-dominantly implementing the solution to‘The Jewish Question,’addressing the supposed subversive power of the Jews in Germany.The staggering numbers start to represent the other fact that these reports do not show,the six million Jews destroyed as the results of paranoia and murderous anti-Semitism. 1936 AUgUSt Olympic Games begin in Berlin. To gain public favor, Hitler and Nazis temporarily stop actions against Jews. 9 Collaboration, USHMM Call Number: 2004.264.1 Front divided into three panels with anti-Semitic caricatures in center panel. The poster refers to the meeting between Henri Philippe Petain, French general and head of the Vichy government in France, and Adolf Hitler in Oct. 1940 at Montoire- sur-le-Loir, France, when Petain offered his collaboration with Nazi Germany. Language(s): In French. 10 The Jew: Instegators of the War, Prolonger of the War, Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, by Hans Schweitzer, 1943. (Herf) 11 He Bears the Guilt for the War! Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, by Hans Schweitzer, 1943. (Herf) VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA HISTORIC VISUAL SURVEY John P Corrigan GD///MFA AH5622 Visual Culture and the Holocaust Jennifer Hirsh Spring 2007 18 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 19 being led to pain and death,at the hands of the Jews.The language insists that Jews were making millions off the continual war with Germany and toasting to the defeat of both Germany and Poland.The radical language twists the fate of German Jews,subjecting them to the horrendous crimes against them.Nazi anti-Semitic propaganda used language to invert the roles of the Jews lying (sic.) false claims to distort the true actions of the crimes against Jews on Polish land, namely the establishment of both concentration and death camps in Poland. Nazi propaganda persuaded the Poles,historically skeptical to both the Germans and the Russians,in effect,to doubt their implications in the war.Germany needed the Poles assistance in fighting the Russian advance.Anti-Semitism added fuel for hate citing the mass population of and their‘demented intentions’against the state of Poland.Prolonged anti-Semitic reasoning had created contempt of the Jews by Polish citizens increasingly since the Nazi regime,justifying the killings and interment of thousands of Polish Jews. Anti-Polish propaganda used by the Nazis was an exaggerated account of similar propaganda used in other countries to be annexed and incorporated into the Reich.Poland was the first nation misleadingly led into the war with Germany,and subsequently encouraged England’s involvement into World War II.As a bordering country to Germany,and a country also seemingly plagued,in Nazi terms,with a similar scourge of Jews.The Nazi held contempt for the Poles.Historically the Poles had their own version of anti-Semitism and had enacted their own pogroms of hate on the Jews.Germany used its relationship with Poland in a constant state of manipulation. Nazis consistently made claims that they were cleansing Jews of all Europe at the betterment of Germans and Poles. Any further usage of the swastika,beyond specific historical reference must be avoided at all costs.Steven Heller’s book,Swastika Beyond Redemption,lays out the increasing potential of contemporary derivatives by examining the historical usage and origins of the swastika.Racial segregation appeared in Germanic Free Masonry cults dating back to the 1890’s.Swastika like images appeared on various forms of Aryan brotherhood literature,pre-dating the radical influences of the Nazis.Early symbol identification extended the Swastika symbol representing secret German folk nationalism.These secret orders expanded on the already prevalent symbols of mystic origins,further extending it once again to represent the pure order of Aryan supremacy. Viennese-born Guido Von List,(1848-1919) asserted the Swastika with supernatural power,(Heller,51) linking it with Aryan’s strength and energy.List’s idea was also responsible for the Gothic revival in Germany,encouraging Germanic conservative art and architecture.List was responsible for the classic revival of writing with spiky Fraktur type because it glorified the past strength and resolve.(Heller,54) The swastika image was used in World War I by a militarist German youth movement.Hitler,like other World War I veterans,and secret Germanic brotherhood’s, believed the Jews,Communists,and Republicans betrayed and profited from Germany at the end of the war.Hitler strongly identified and was inspired by the national style, co-opting the symbol for his own usage,unifying his anti-Semitic beliefs with those of his brothers.Hitler’s book,Mein Kampf (My Struggle) was devoted to semiotics and Germanic heroism.He had previously witnessed the strength and visual impact that the Communist party used to create a political spectacle.Hitler’s first commission for the Nazi movement was as its propaganda chief.As a former art student,Hitler easily understood the power of symbolism and propaganda in the effort of the war.He had witnessed the new visual age and realized the impact propaganda could have on the masses.As the newly formed leader of Nazism he choose to be its art director and image manipulator. Hitler’s vision of the new German Reich imagined past glories and the ultimate destruction of its enemies—including of the Weimar Republic,Jews,and Communists. Hitler’s final design was stolen from Dr.Friedrich Krohn,a Völkish symbology scholar. Through Mein Kampf,Hitler was able to strengthen the past symbol,changing the visual direction,a denotation of forward power.Without further debate,the Nazi symbol,with 1940 JUlY Eichmann proposes his Madagascar Plan, which would deport all European Jews to the island of Madagascar, off the coast of east Africa. The first anti-Jewish measures are taken in Vichy France. AUgUSt Romania introduces anti-Jewish measures restricting education and employment, and then begins the “Romanianization” of Jewish businesses. OctObeR Vichy France signs its own version of the Nuremberg Laws. THE ULTIMATE ANTI-SEMITISM SYMbOL The Jewish Conspiracy Parole der Woshe, Reich Propaganda Directorate of the Nazi Party, 1941. (Herf) 20 Nazi propaganda visually mapped the Jewish conspiracy falsly linking outspoken political intellectuals with Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin in America, England, and Russia. 12 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 13 Nazi anti-Semitic theories,were disseminated from the writings of Adolf Hitler’s book Mein Kampf. Hitler’s chief conspirator in the proliferation of anti-Semitic propaganda was Joseph Goebbels. Through Hitler and Goebbels the Nazi party generated prolific amounts of effective propaganda.First to win the popular election of Hitler and secondly the anti-Semitic campaign aimed at the destruction of European Jews.Nazi propaganda pioneered the use of modern communication methods,incorporating radio,aerial travel, and the novelty of film (Bytwerk,11) was used to establish the Third Reich as a strong and powerful political force.In the publication Paper War,Randall Bytwerk introduces Hitler’s clear identification of propaganda’s use to persuade the masses.Bytwerk quotes Hitler’s writings in Mein Kampf,“The act of propaganda lies in understanding the emotional ideas of the great masses and finding,through a psychologically correct form,the way to the attention and thence to the heart of the broad masses.” (Bytwerk,11) Hitler’s anti-Semitic convictions was addressed,supported and inflated by his closest party propagandists.His core of experienced supporters were Joseph Goebbels,Otto Dietrich,and Alfred Rosenburg. (Herf,17) During the past Weimar Republic years,Nazi propagandists learned the importance and influential methods to distort the reporting of both political and military news worthy stories.Half- truths selected,omitted,and downplayed historical facts,slanting fact and fiction.Most effective propaganda does not consist of blatant lies, for the truth always has the potential to be found. By January 1933,the Nazi party confiscated,destroyed, eliminated,and closed all opposing newspaper and publications.This process led to the expulsion of German journalists,including Jews, Social Democrats,Communists,political writers,and other forms of political dissent.By the end of 1933,the Nazis controlled all remaining papers and free press,also enacting laws forbidding Jews as editors, and banning those married to Jews from practicing journalism. The Nazi Press Office in Propaganda Ministry was run by Otto Dietrich.Both the Reich Press Chamber and German Association of Newspapers and Periodical Publishers was ran by Max Amann,a close friend of Hitler,who helped publish Mein Kampf.Under both ministries,Nazi ownership and influence of all remaining privately owned newspapers had to attest to orders officially directed from the Nazi ministries.All information was now in the control of a hand selected few from the Nazi party.Each,in their own right,had made public testimonies to party members making their intentions regarding‘the Jewish question’known to all.At the head of the propaganda chain,its chief Adolf Hitler,who along with Goebbels directed the anti-Semitic hatred and war against the Jews. Goebbels who was now in charge of the Propaganda Ministry,was director of press divisions,mass speaking engagements,political rallies,cultural events,radio,and film.The Office of Active Propaganda produced pamphlets and posters. Goebbels was directly responsible for many academic and scholarly publications.He formerly had been editor of Der Angriff (The Attack) the official National daily newspaper of the Nazi party,Der Völkische Beobachter (VB),and Das Reich.Herf writes that,“Das Reich focused exclusively on the Jews,and anti-Semitic motifs were ubiquitous.” (Herf,21) Jeffrey Herf places a large influence of anti-Semitic rhetoric on Otto Dietrich.He was the Reich press chief,and unlike Goebbels, worked in Hitler’s office everyday.To a large extent,his specific mission was to enrage the Germans against the Jews.Herf accounts of the multiple Nazi ministries,all of which maintained anti-Semitic propaganda as their chief reasoning for existence.At the core of these ministries of propaganda,a small frequently reported set group of men are solely responsible for the consistent messages of hate.The list:Adolf Hitler,Joseph Goebbels,Otto Dietrich,and Alfred Rosenburg. 13 Der Stürmer. “Jewish Murder Plan against Gentile Humanity Revealed,” issue accusing Jews of practicing ritual murder to secure the blood of Christians to use in Jewish religious rituals. Special Issue: May 1934. (Calvin College Archive) 1938 MARch Germany takes over Austria and all anti-Jewish laws are enforced. ApRil Nazis require Jews to register wealth and property. JUlY Nazis require Jews over age 15 to apply for identity cards to be shown on demand to any police officer. Jewish doctors are prohibited by law from practicing medicine. AUgUSt Nazis destroy the synagogue in Nuremberg. Nazis require all Jewish women to add “Sarah” and all men to add “Israel” to their names on all legal documents, including passports. SepteMbeR Jews are prohibited from all legal practices. OctObeR Law requires Jewish passports to be stamped with a large red “J.” NOveMbeR Kristallnacht: The Night of the Broken Glass, Nazis attack Jews throughout Germany—30,000 Jews are arrested; 91 are killed; 7,500 shops and businesses are looted; and more than 1,000 synagogues are burned. Nazis fine Jews one billion marks for the damages. Jewish children are expelled from public schools. DeceMbeR A law is passed calling for the Aryanization of all Jewish businesses. Hermann Goering takes charge of resolving the “Jewish Question.” NAZI OffICES AND OffICERS Der Stürmer (The Stormer) was a weekly Nazi newspaper published from 1923 to the end of World War II in 1945. It was a significant part of the Nazi propaganda machinery and was vehemently anti- Semitic. Der Stürmer often ran obscene materials such as anti-Semitic caricatures and propaganda accusations of blood libel. 20 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 21 its white,black,and red flag was implemented for the Nazi regime. Hitler debuted his creation in 1920,encouraging and mandating his creation for the sole usage as the true Nazi identity.The swastika’s systematic usage,under the minister of propaganda,Joseph Goebbels, and architect Albert Speer,incorporated it into every aspect of Nazi representation.Even the most vociferous opponents of Nazism agree that Hitler’s‘identity system’is the most ingeniously consistent graphic program ever devised—is attributed to his visual mastery of the design and propaganda process.(Heller,69) On September 15,1935,Hitler enacted the first Nuremburg laws,making the Swastika Germany’s only national flag.(Heller,71) On the same day,the next laws were against the Jews,removing the rights and citizenships,and prohibition of them from ever flying the German national flag.(Heller,72) Over the next few years the swastika was codified into national icon—ultimately denoting it as the symbol synonymous with evil. After the destruction of the Nazi regime,as the Nazi symbol retreats into mythic memory,the danger remains for its usage to represent some new abhorrent form or resurgence of Nazi anti- Semitic intolerance—or even worse an effigy of a destroyed dictator. REACTION Increasing usage by Aryan inspired anti-Semitic militias and white supremacist hate groups are to be kept in check.The reoccurring usage implies a call to arms and the potential to cause a resurgence of hatred is to be considered intolerable.Every time I personally encounter the image of the swastika, whether in Heller’s book,a flag in a Jewish historical museum,or commentary on contemporary supremacist power,as telling illustration I am left in shock and horror.Contemporary usage of the swastika,newly describing the American Fascist or Republican Party does not serve as an appropriate aesthetic,even to describe the current political regime.The usage of the swastika represents everything that I find offensive.Heller questions the symbols potential redemption,and I believe he would agree that any usage is wrong and hurtful in any context.Its representation is especially dangerous in political usage—even if it is to describe our current state of affairs.Its usage wrongfully addresses ideas of anti-Semitism. 21 Graphic artists in the Hitler Youth c. 1938. (Heller, 60) 23 Down with Financial Enslavement! Vote National Socialist! Nazi Election poster, by Hans Schweitzer, 1924. (Herf, 32) 1941 FebRUARY 430 Jewish hostages are deported from Amsterdam after a Dutch Nazi is killed by Jews. SepteMbeR German Jews are ordered to wear yellow stars. OctObeR Nazis forbid emigration of Jews from the Reich. NOveMbeR The Theresienstadt Ghetto is established near Prague as a model ghetto for Nazi propaganda purposes. During a cabinet meeting, Hans Frank, Gauleiter of Poland, says “Gentlemen, I must ask you to rid yourselves of all feeling of pity. We must annihilate the Jews wherever we find them.” Always the Same Goal: Germany Must be Exterminated, Parole der Woshe, Reich Propaganda Directorate of the Nazi Party, 1941. (Herf) 22 They Will Stop Laughing!!! Parole der Woshe, Reich Propaganda Directorate of the Nazi Party, 1942. (Herf, 168) 24 As the Nazis intensified mass murders, and concentration camps reached their maximum efficiency, the language of The Posters of the Week became increasingly accusational of the Jewish politcal agenda. Poster text quoted from a Hitler speech regarding his early proficy of Jewish extermination. Hitler repeatedly reference the jews as ‘them laughing,’ ‘once laughed,’ or ‘if the laughter has already gone from them.’ Hitler publically announced his ordering and implimentation the extermination of the Jews. 14 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 15 Whether it be the Office of Active Propaganda,Propaganda Ministry,or the Reich Press Office,the continuity remained, propagators of the continued hatred and oppression,and offered the supposed answers to‘the Jewish Question.’ Under the Office of Active Propaganda,the Institute zum Studium der Judanfrage, and its bi-weekly journal,Antisemitische Aktion that Die Judenfrage,authored ideological and theoretical offerings regarding‘the Jewish Question.’According to Herf,the anti-Semitic topics included,“the Jews as a race;the national and international impact of the Jews on economic,political,and cultural life of modern nations…”(Herf,28) With continuing active debate paramount,the group oversaw the theft of treasured Jewish objects from all over Nazi occupied Europe. The Nazi rhetoric sought to permanently expel the Jews,and all their implied misery and suffering caused to the nation of Germany. Accusations of international Jewish conspiracy,were explicity enacted by political opposition from England and America.The Jews were believed to be searching for the destruction of Germany to create the founding of their own statehood.This belief was propagated by Reich propaganda offices,encouraged by Hitler,and used to substantiate the destruction of European Jewry. While anti-Semitic propaganda remains a constant,the Nazis also created racist propaganda directed at all of its declared enemies.Early in the Nazi regime’s climb to power,specific propaganda was aimed at the Polish,specifically leading to the introduction of World War II with the Nazis advancement on Poland. Nazi anti-Polish propaganda declared the Pole an inferior, claiming the insignificant accomplishments of the Polish nation in regards to the other European nations.On October 23,1939,the Nazi Periodical Service officially dictated that future associations with the words:‘Pole,’‘Poland,’and‘Polish’to be indicative of sloppy and objectionable behavior.(Herf,58) Nazi racial purity condemned any mixture of German bloodlines.Reported fraternization between German soldiers and Polish women led to the directive stated by Jeffrey Herf,“Every blood- linked mixture between Germans and Poles leads to racial decline in German blood.”(Herf,58) Nazi propaganda linked Poles,Gypsies and Jews,however they did not assert that Poles were part of the International conspiracy, that was specifically left prescribed to the Jews of Europe.As Hitler’s army began to loose Polish ground in 1944,propaganda adjusted its claims.Nazis leaflet‘newspapers’addressed the Poles as heroic dupes contracted by both the Americans and the Russians.Propaganda frequently described the killings of thousands of Polish soldiers by the blood red murderous hands of the Russian and Bolshevik army. Nazis laid claims to encourage the Poles to stop fighting and go home, rejecting the leadership of International Jewry leading the Russian fight against them. Propaganda directed at the Poles consisted of horrific accounts of anti-Semitic atrocities.The visual tone implied Jewish control of the advancing Russian army.Often times,indicating International Jewry behind the scenes were enjoying their lives on English or American soil.The formal language addresses the heroic fighter 1939 JANUARY Goering orders the emigration of Jews speeded up. FebRUARY Nazis force Jews to hand over all gold and silver items. ApRil Slovakia passes its own version of the Nuremberg Laws. Jews are forbidden rights as tenants and are relocated into Jewish houses. JUlY German Jews are forbidden the right to hold government jobs. Adolf Eichmann is appointed director of the Prague Office of Jewish Emigration. SepteMbeR Nazis order Polish Jews into restricted ghettos and force them into slave labor. German Jews are forbidden to own wireless radios. NOveMbeR Yellow stars are required to be worn by Polish Jews over the age of 10. DeceMbeR Adolf Eichmann takes over the section of the Gestapo dealing with Jewish affairs and evacuations. ANTI-POLISH PROPAGANDA 14 Who Bears the Guilt for the War? Parole der Woshe, Reich Propaganda Directorate of the Nazi Party, 1942. (Herf, 153) 15 The Jews Wanted the War! Parole der Woshe, Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda 1941. (Herf) For the first time, images of Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin put faces to the Jewish co-conspirators in the International conspiracy of the Jews. The National leaders were described by the Nazis as figure heads fronting Jewish advance on Germany. The size of Roosevelt represents his influence of Jewish advisors. 22 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 23 Of the anti-Semitic propaganda used by the Nazis,predominantly the most effective form of communication was that of printed matter— en mass.The commercial and industrial strength of the printing industry led to the direct and immediate form of the printed visual political poster. The Active Propaganda Division in the Propaganda Ministry was responsible for the direction and national implementation of the propaganda machine.The placement of graphic street‘wall newspapers’was crucial for the Nazis to bombard every German citizen with news generated from the propaganda ministries.The predominant form of transportation was propelled by pedestrian traffic.Public transportation was used by most Germans, especially in the highly developed city of Berlin,making posters noticeably present and highly visible to all Germans. Nazi directives place all forms of political posters through an array of national,state,provincial,local,and specific bureaus of information.The influx of active political members was required by Nazi law.The distribution was statewide and mandatory.Labor and professional organizations were required to respond and post all Nazi party dictated materials.Under the Third Reich,the nation of pedestrians came to convergence in centralized public spaces.The political poster was favored to film and radio due to its prevalence truly amongst the people.Every German citizen that could read was exposed to the political agenda prescribed by the Nazis,including the vast and repeated message of sanctioned anti-Semitism. The Word of the Week (Parole der Woche) wall newspapers became crucial and pervasive forms of visual propaganda.From 1937-1943,in all of Nazi Germany,its images were unified everywhere. Jeffrey Herf quotes Walter Benjamin,“The Word of the Week wall newspapers were stunning examples of the work in propaganda in the era of mechanical reproduction.”(Herf,29) Hitler personally appointed Hans Schweitzer with the task of translating Nazi ideology to the uniforms,stamps,and posters. The Word of the Week poster campaign was directed to‘document’ (emphasis) political events important to the people of Germany. Hitler’s strict criteria for judgment was,its effectiveness.The Nazi propaganda offices where supplied with the actions and reactions of the people at the local level.This system of evaluation had previous been used by the Weimar Republic. According to Jeffrey Herf,specific production actualities of The Word of the Week campaign;“the first edition was distributed on March 16,1936.By January 1941,eight million copies had been distributed,approximately 125,000 a week.”(Herf,30) Everything about the campaign became a political activity,from the message by design to be read by everyone,to the distribution handled by party members.The visual tone of the poster utilized bold type and strong use of Nazi influenced colors In stark contrast to the previous political posters of the Weimar Republic,which advocated for high modernism incorporating dogmatic works of Bauhaus and DaDa artists,Nazi propaganda resisted‘degenerate art’created by German émigrés.Nazi propaganda revisited past German glorification of the mythological Aryan hero. Initial Nazi posters featured Germanic völkisch type.Contemporary Germans at first had a difficulty grasping antiquated letterforms. Hitler initially rejected Gothic styled modern letterforms,associating their prevalence on Swashbacher type styles associated with the Jews in the graphic forms presented by the Bolshevik’s. Jeffrey Herf adds significant anti-Semitic representation in The Word of the Week in its direct reinforcement,specific to anti- Semitism as well as the greater reports of the Holocaust.Herf report the quantity of anti-Semitic wall newspapers coincided with varying Nazi programs against the Jews.Herf writes,“Between 1936 and 1940, anti-Semitic themes were infrequent.In 1940,only three of the wall newspapers broached them.From 1941 to winter 1943,about a quarter Fraktur typefaces advertised in Graphische Nachrichten Berlin 1935. (Hollis, 66) 27 1942 ApRil German Jews are banned from using public transportation. JUNe Jews in France, Holland, Belgium, Croatia, Slovakia, and Romania are required to wear yellow stars. SepteMbeR Food rations for Jews in Germany are reduced. DeceMbeR The British Foreign Secretary Eden tells the British House of Commons the Nazis are “now carrying into effect Hitler’s oft repeated intention to exterminate the Jewish people of Europe.” The United States declares those crimes will be avenged. NAZI PROPAGANDA DESIGN ObJECTIVES The Jew Kaufman Outdone! Parole der Woshe, Reich Propaganda Directorate of the Nazi Party, 1942. (Herf, 111) 26 Jewish author Nathan Kaufman, self published Germany Must Die, an angry anti-Nazi book of writing calling for the International retaliation for the persecution of the Jews. The book was wrongly linked for its influence on American political and intellectual policies against Germany. 25The War Aim of World Plutocracy Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda 1941. (Herf) 26 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 27 that a modern Germany,even under National Socialism,needed a sustained consumer economy was disguised by party rhetoric and official propaganda.”(Aynsley,180) Aynsley argues that the effectiveness of Nazi propaganda, stating its‘own’claim on völkish ideas and return to neo-classical was inherent in the propaganda itself.Beyond the total rejection of Weimar representation,Nazi artistic representation claimed modernization for their own.This testament remains intact when comparative consideration of the magnitude of graphics supplied by the Nazis,and extended grandness of its architectural extremes.In the proprietary interest of National Socialist system,graphic evidence incorporated the Bauhaus Modernism specific to publicity. After the Nazi election in 1933,all arts and media control was under the jurisdiction of the Reich’s Ministry for Education and Propaganda.Under Goebbels international responsibilities concerned with the display of German art,film,and sport;while domestic responsibility controlled festivals,the press,radio,education, art,and music.All design efforts consisted of official commissions, heavy restrictions forced many Jewish artists out of Germany,and others consequently were attacked as cultural Bolshevik’s and were murdered (Aynsley,189) those lucky enough to emigrate did so quickly.Aynsley documents,“The last exhibition of graphic art, entitled The Jewish Poster, took place at the Jewish Museum in Berlin in March 1937,before the final devastating stage in the obliteration of the Jewish Germans in the Kristallnacht pogrom of November 9 and 10,1938.”(Aynsley,190) The Reich Advertising Division declared a unification of leadership for the direction of political,cultural,and economic concerns. Aynsley studies the language and graphic representation of Gebrauchsgraphik,a newly converted graphic magazine under the Nazi regime.The magazine continued to represent contemporary styles not allowed by the Nazi regime,yet still covering International design styles.The magazine was allowed to show foreign work from the United States,England, France,and with great interest an emphasis in the popular Fascist design of Italy.An International attitude invited Herbert Bayer to create its cover in October 1938.(Aynsley,193) Aynsley makes a final cautionary note saying,“The continuing pluralism in Gebrauchsgraphik after 1933 should not mislead the historian into believing that there was an open editorial policy,unchanged by political events.The distinct ideological nature of the overall coverage of official design events warns against this reading. (Aynsley 195) Similar to the staged propaganda of the Olympic Games held by the Nazis in Berlin in 1936, Herbert Bayer’s exhibition and design work was used to propagate,as Aynsley writes,“an image of national economic potential for domestic and foreign audiences alike.”(Aynsley,205) While Herbert Bayer work does not represent anti-Semitic propaganda,it both establishes and demystifies the conflicted history of Nazi design. While National Socialism held fast to neo-classical representations its process and attitudes are still fascinated by the industrial and cultural revolution that Nazi power was to identify itself with. ITS INTOLERANT ATTITUDE CERTAINLY CORRESPONDS IN PARTICULAR TO THE GERMAN INCLINATION TO THE AbSOLUTE; ITS MILITARY wILL- TO-ORDER AND ITS CLAIM TO SOLE POwER CORRESPOND TO THOSE fEARfUL COMPONENTS Of GERMAN-NESS wHICH UNLEASHED HITLER’S RULE AND SECOND wORLD wAR. 2 Jan Tschihold, “Glaube und Wirklichkeit,” Schweizer Graphische Mitteilungen, 65, No.6, June 1946. 2 Aynsley seems to perfectly encapsulate his academic analysis with a quote from Jan Tschihold, (Aynsley, 214) Gebrauchsgraphik Magazine cover, designed by Herbert Bayer, October 1938. (Aynsley, 193) 1944 JANUARY In response to political pressure to help Jews under Nazi control, Roosevelt creates the War Refugee Board. Diary entry by Hans Frank, Gauleiter of Poland, concerning the fate of 2.5 million Jews originally under his jurisdiction, “At the present time we still have in the General Government perhaps 100,000 Jews.” MARch President Roosevelt issues a statement condemning German and Japanese ongoing “crimes against humanity.” MAY Himmler’s agents secretly propose a trade to the western Allies: Jews for trucks and money. The deal is rejected. JUNe A Red Cross delegation visits Theresienstadt after the Nazis have carefully prepared the camp and the Jewish inmates, resulting in a favorable report. 31 16 | NAZI ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA VISUAL CULTURE AND THE HOLOCAUST | 17 TO POLISH OffICERS AND SOLDIERS! The whole world learner with horror of the terrible bestialities bestowed on the Polish people by the blood-thirsty bolsheviks. Practically none of the Officers of the Polish Army, who in 1939 were imprisoned by the Soviets, survived. whether General or Second Lieutenant – it made no difference – all shared the same fate in the forest at Katyn in April 1940. They fell, shot in the backs of their heads by the Red Commissar. This crime, committed by the bestial Soviet Regime, was confirmed by the International committee and the horror displayed to the whole world. 12,000 Polish Officers, the bloom of Polish youth, Poland’s pride, were murdered by bandits from the Kremlin, victims of the madness of the Reds, aspiring to control the whole world. These same bolsheviks who got rid of Polish Officers, tortured, using long and atrocious methods, nearly 3 million poles in Siberia, in concentration camps by the North Sea and Kazakstan Steppes, telling them to die slowly, far from their fatherland. And you,Polish Officer and Soldier,want to give up your life for the murderers of your people who, together with England in a close alliance, are, without scruples, selling your country to Stalin? THINK ON IT, YOU’RE bETRAYING YOUR OwN COUNTRY! COME TO US! EVEN IN THE 5TH YEAR Of THE wAR, wE PROMISE YOU A RETURN TO YOUR fATHERLAND.THERE, YOU wILL bE AbLE TO SERVE YOUR NATIONALS. DEAR POLISH fRIEND! You are fighting, but those who are toasting to the defeat of Poland, who are contributing to the mass murder of a nation, do not know anything about the pains and anxieties of war, and do not appreciate the effect of 5 years’ struggling. You are suffering because they are looking after their own dirty business at your cost. And the war goes on… THE JEwS ARE GETTING THE bEST OUT Of IT. You are wandering far from your close ones, in a far- away country. Thew swindlers are imposters of the war are away from the front, enjoying every comfort, surrounded by their families. but they are pushing you to war whilst sitting in their warm houses where they do not want for anything. At the cost of your pains and toils, at the cost of your blood, they are collecting millions. They do not care that you are disappearing, because gigantic profits are more important to them. Your families, like our, are really feeling the effects of the war. They have to work hard, and they have recognized the red disease approaching from the East. Your families do not believe that Stalin’s victory can make Poland happy. would you like to know how your nearest and dearest are, what they think of the war, and how they are yearning for you? If you do – come to us. we assure you an instant return to your fatherland. Your wives, children and beloved fatherland await you! SLOGAN: GO HOME!! Leaflet 7 back, “Paper War,” Mark Batty Publisher, p.37. The visual tone has a heightened use of red–indicating Polish blood shed, as well as the color of the red army. The three striking symbols specific to anti-Semitic propaganda is firstly the remote Jewish figure holding the string. The caricature is involved but indirectly responsible. Large exaggerated rat-like nose, mouth and tail is also exaggerated with a brief-case. The second visual distortion is the ‘Bolshevik’ red army soldiers, with the blatant Star of David, as they are presumably controlled by the Nazi ideas of Jews central influence of the Bolshevik revolution in Bytwerk, Randall L. Translation: Leaflet 7 back,“Paper War,” Mark Batty Publisher, p.37. 17 Russia. One could read into the swinging pendulu | 115 NAZ ANT -SEM T C PROPAGANDA H STOR C V SUAL SURVEY PAGES 2 11 SPR NG 2007 V sua Cu ure and he Ho ocaus PROJECT SUMMARY Research and des gn crea ed or a gradua e sem nar c ass ha ooked a he v sua cu ure o he Ho ocaus chose o research he crea on o Naz an Sem c propaganda pay ng par cu ar a en on o he m ss ng gap n he h s ory o graph c des gn PAGES 12 15 PAGES 16 19 PAGES 20 23 PAGES 24 27 PAGES 28 29
  • + code Processing For Designers PFont font; doc setup(){ size(8.5,8.5); textAlign(RIGHT); page >R< odd {cvr} Yeohyun Ahn. Viviana Cordova. > DEFAULT < end. Grass, Uncut and Trimmed typeface It was my first semester in the Graphic Design Graduate Program at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) when Ellen Lupton, my former graduate director, introduced me to Processing. Processing is a programming language for the electronic arts and visual design community created by Ben Fry and Casey Reas.With Processing, designers can create posters, typography, information visualization, interactive design, motion graphics, animation, etc. Using coding in Processing helps designers to extend and explore their creativity in terms of mathematic rules based, algorithms based, and libraries oriented designs.The following website, www.processing.org, allows designers to download Processing for free, take free tutorials, and share their codes. As a part of a proposal, Contemporary Ornament, for PRINT, American’s Graphic Design Magazine, I created a simple code, ellipse(), creating circles, in Processing. I then added a semi control mouse event into my code, that whenever clicked and dragged on screen in Processing, it creates logically but visually unexpected and fresh intricate designs, using only circles. I was fascinated by the semi randomness and the complexity generated by ellipse(), and mousePressed, in Processing. Soon my design was accepted by PRINT, American’s Graphic Design Magazine, in March, 2006, and it was chosen for the cover design for the upcoming book, Graphic Design: New Basics, written by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips, in 2008. Throughout my past two years as a graduate student at MICA, I spent all of my time exploring new ways to create with Processing to be included into the book, Graphic Design: New Basics. It is a new book refocused on the study of the fundamentals of form and ideas in a critical, rigorous way, informed by contemporary media, theory and software systems. It was directed and written by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips in the contribution with the students at Maryland Institute College of Art.When I read the book draft, I intuitively realized that it would be very useful and practical for current graphic designers and graphic design majors since all of Ellen Lupton’s previous books such as Thinking with TYPE, Design Writing Research, D.I.Y Design It Yourself, etc, have been demonstrated before. The common graphic design manuals such Armin Hofmann’s Graphic Design Manual is a timeless tutorial book, but it is classic and modern, so I thought that we as a graphic designer need a new manuals to reflect contemporary graphic design phenomenon. Processing for Designers PFont font;Universe doc setup(){ size(8.5,8.5); textAlign(RIGHT); page >R< odd page {15} >Introduction< _Yeohyun.Ahn Type + Code PFont font; Universe doc setup(){ size(8.5,8.5); textAlign(RIGHT); page >L< even previous page {14} >FRONT MATTER< angle x2,y2 x1,y1 level 2 level 1 Type + Code page >L< even {60} page Yeohyun Ahn. Y-system(x1, y1, x2, y2, angle,level) Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {61} >Y—system< void setup() { size(800, 800); background(255); } void draw() { Y-system(400, 600, 400, 550, 30,3); } void Y-system(float sx, float sy, float ex, float ey, int angle, int level) { int new_level = level-1; line(sx,sy,ex,ey); if(level>0) {float dist = sqrt( (sx-ex)*(sx-ex)+(sy-ey)*(sy-ey) ); float dx = (ex-sx)/dist; float dy= (ey-sy)/dist; float R = radians(angle); float new_dist = 0.9*dist*cos(R); float new_cx = ex+dx*new_dist; float new_cy = ey+dy*new_dist;float final_dist = 0.9*dist*sin(R); float dx1 = -dy; float dy1 = dx; float dx2 = dy; float dy2 = -dx; float new_ex1 = new_cx+dx1*final_dist; float new_ey1 = new_cy+dy1*final_dist; float new_ex2 = new_cx+dx2*final_dist; float new_ey2 = new_cy+dy2*final_dist; Y-system(ex, ey, new_ex1, new_ey1, angle, new_level); Y-system(ex, ey, new_ex2, new_ey2, angle, new_level); } return; } Type + Code page >L< even {20} page Yeohyun Ahn. Viviana Cordova. Spike typeface Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {21} >Type Generation< Type + Code page >L< even {64} page Yeohyun Ahn. void setup() { size(800, 800); background(255); } void draw() { Y-system(400, 10, 400, 50, 30,10); } void Y-system(float sx, float sy, float ex, float ey, int angle, int level) { int new_level = level-1; line(sx,sy,ex,ey); if(level>0) {float dist = sqrt( (sx-ex)*(sx-ex)+(sy-ey)*(sy-ey) ); float dx = (ex-sx)/dist; float dy= (ey-sy)/dist; float R = radians(angle); float new_dist = 0.9*dist*cos(R); float new_cx = ex+dx*new_dist; float new_cy = ey+dy*new_dist;float final_dist = 0.9*dist*sin(R); float dx1 = -dy; float dy1 = dx; float dx2 = dy; float dy2 = -dx; float new_ex1 = new_cx+dx1*final_dist; float new_ey1 = new_cy+dy1*final_dist; float new_ex2 = new_cx+dx2*final_dist; float new_ey2 = new_cy+dy2*final_dist; Y-system(ex, ey, new_ex1, new_ey1, angle, new_level); Y-system(ex, ey, new_ex2, new_ey2, angle, new_level); } return; } Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {65} >Y—system< Asymetric pattern design. Type + Code page >L< even {48} page Yeohyun Ahn. Viviana Cordova. PFont myFont; void setup() { size(800, 800); background(255,255,255); // String[] fontList = PFont.list(); // println(fontList); myFont = createFont(”Times-Roman”,48); textFont(myFont,272); translate(400,400); for(int i=0;i<6;i=i+1) { fill(0,0,0); textAlign(CENTER); pushMatrix(); rotate(PI*i/3); text(”A”,0,0); popMatrix(); } } If students want to change the font styles, please delete // on the above code, all of available fonts will be displayed on the bottom window in Processing. And then, if you want to change the font, Times-Roman,to Helvetica , please change myFont = createFont(”Helvetica”,48); Center Rotation For() and Rotate() This function is comparitively exclusive to Processing. Generates random numbers. Each time the random() function is called, it returns an unexpected value within the specified range.The random() function can be added to any of the existing basic code structure. pushMatrix and popMatrix is introduced on page 45. Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {49} >Basic Functions< A B C D E F S Alter the letters in text(“S” .0.0); from A to Z G H I J K L M N O P Q R T U V W X Y Z Type + Code page >L< even {56} page Yeohyun Ahn. Viviana Cordova. Darrk Light typeface Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {57} >Type Generation< Slinky typeface Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {69} >Y—system< Y-system(400, 400, 400, 490, 30, 13); //up Y-system(400, 400, 400, 310, 30, 13); //down Y-system(400, 400, 310, 400, 30, 13); //left Y-system(400, 400, 490, 400, 30, 13); //right 0,0 0,800 800,0 800,800 400, 400 Nested pattern designs establish the tone and contrast of the base pattern, and the full page design. Type + Code page >L< even {88} page Yeohyun Ahn. Viviana Cordova. Two seperate Caligraft code structures are combined to create a striking contrast of line qualities. While Processing does not effectively support multiple samples, flatened frames can be combined in print applications. The “M” belongs to code structure 2, while “fear” uses code structure 1. Type + Code page >L< even {116} page Yeohyun Ahn. Viviana Cordova. Chain typeface Processing for Designers page >R< odd page {117} >Type Generation< | 117 TYPE + CODE Processing For Designers Yeohyun Ahn Viviana Cordova PROJECT SUMMARY Type + Code, explores the aesthetic of experimental code driven typography, with an emphasis on the programming language Processing which was created by Casey Reas and Ben Fry. This book includes examples using Processing on basic, intermediate and advanced levels. This independently published book revised Yeohyun Ahn’s graduate thesis project. I collaborated with Yeohyn Ahn and Viviana Cordova to create a new interpretation of Ahn’s work with Processing, intended for designers to provide instructional tools to be able to promote processing as a viable design tool. With limited understanding of the language and usage I was able to direct Ahn to create tutorials and examples that best identify the design possibilities. Previously Ahn had created a number of separate but highly visual and independent letter forms. Using my design and editing skills I was able to articulate Ahn’s intentions and vision encouraging her to create specific letter forms and examples that would expand her content. By working closely with her I was able to recontexualize the richness and depth offered by Processing to generate complex and biomorphic random designs.
  • | 119 ARTISTS SPACE, NYC Responsible for direction, production and photo editing. Book includes images provided by Artist Space photo archives. The book includes a running time lime of art shows, comments from both contemporary artists, as well as former members, past and present Director interviews. Images refer to any given exhibition on that given page. I also was responsible for editing and choosing pull quotes to be used throughout the book. Each spread, based on a grid made of a scalable rectangle in proportion to book dimensions, allows the time line to exist in a malleable set of information boxes. The surrounding text, artist comments, refer to the shows and general time frame connected to the exhibition date. The images were allowed to openly conform to the structure of the grid, while engaging the date in association. Pictures became integral in overlapping show dates, and connecting each page in the greater context of the many faces of Artists Space. Compiled and designed 500 ARTISTS RETURN TO ARTISTS SPACE: 25 YEARS, with staff and editors at Design / Writing / Research, Fall 1998. PROJECT SUMMARY
  • 40 | Indie Publishing chalet burin sans trade gothic united serif thin fontin bold house spaceage round dot matrix Display Faces In addition to typefaces intended for use in your body text, captions, subheads, and so on, you may want to add spice at larger scales with an additional typeface. Called display fonts, some faces are intended for use only as titles, headlines, logos, and other uses that involve just a few words. thIS IS VINYl, A hOmEGROWN, hANDmADE DISplAY fACE. Vinyl is a typeface created by John Corrigan, one of the authors and designers of this book. This DIY typeface exists only in capital letters. 02_Design_Basics.indd 40 5/23/08 9:03:45 AM Tony Venne Joo Ha Danielle Davis Design by Ryan Clifford; illustration by Tricia Chin Ryan Clifford Lindsey M. Muir Kristian Bjørnard John P. Corrigan Helen Armstrong Design Basics |43 Cover Gallery 02_Design_Basics.indd 43 5/23/08 9:04:42 AM 08_Exhibition.indd 96 5/23/08 9:47:20 AM exhibition catalogs By John P. Corrigan When artists or curators produce exhibitions, they put a lot of thought into how to display the works on view. How high should the pieces be hung, and in what order? Are the works framed or unframed, close together or spread far apart? Are the pieces in dialog with each other, or is each one a self-contained statement? Will the work be identified with labels on the wall or with a printed list? Similar design decisions go into making an exhibition catalog or any book of photographs and reproductions of works of art. Such books present and display reproductions in a manner that makes the works compelling and accessible to readers. An art or photography book is a document of works that exist elsewhere. Often, the photographs in a book are the only permanent record of an installation or performance. The printed page is no substitute for experiencing art in the flesh, even though the quality and availability of color reproductions has increased rapidly over the past decade. Just as a documentary film is an edited, authored depiction of reality, so an exhibition catalog or other art book is an edited, staged selection of images. The seemingly neutral, anonymous format of many art books has been deliberately designed in order to create an authoritative yet inviting atmosphere for looking at reproductions. Layout and typography serve to emphasize the work, as the book itself steps into the background. 08_Exhibition.indd 97 5/23/08 9:47:23 AM | 121 INDIE PUBLISHING: HOW TO DESIGN AND PRODUCE YOUR OWN BOOK Left: PAGE 40 In addition to creating content and a visual exer- cise, the book also utilizes a display typeface that I designed for limited and personal use. The typeface is used for chapter head- lines and the cover of the book. Right: PAGE 43 The middle row right cover was designed as a potential cover submitted to Princeton, ultimately a different cover was chosen for publication. Chapter Introduction PAGES 96-97 Edited by Ellen Lupton Princeton Architectural Press, Fall 2008. PROJECT SUMMARY Page proofs and collaborative design tutorials created as both inspirational and educational resources. The book was created as a studio project at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Top: PAGES 98-99 Bottom: PAGES 100-101 | Indie Publishing98 An art book is an invaluable tool for artists who want to document their work and share it with various audiences, including collectors, curators, collaborators, grants organizations, fellow artists, and the general public. Creating a clean, simple design that focuses attention on the work is a good place to start. Use scale, rhythm, sequence, and white space to present a selection of images in an inviting manner. Arrange works in a sequence that encourages dialogue and comparison between images. At the same time, understand that readers will free to flip through your book and stop where their interest takes them. A good art book or exhibition catalog creates opportunities to wander and rest— just like a good exhibition design. Pictures are often the dominant content of an exhibition catalog, although you may also want to include essays, captions, and a checklist. An essay by a critic or writer adds weight and value to your book. Commissioning an original text is a great way to collaborate with a writer and acquire fresh insight about an artist’s work. A checklist is a complete list of all the works that were featured in the exhibition, including those that may not appear in the catalog. This document, which typically includes titles of works, dimensions, media, and other basic information, becomes an official record of the exhibition’s content, valuable to curators, researchers, artists, and dealers in the future. study your pictures Look at all your pictures before choosing what shape your book will be. If most of your pictures are horizontal, for example, you may prefer a horizontal book. Also consider the length and importance of your captions. These take up more room on the page than you might expect. 08_Exhibition.indd 98 5/23/08 9:47:24 AM Exhibition Catalogs |99 choosing a format Your choice of format will be influenced by the printing method you choose to use as well as by your book’s content. Some pages sizes are more economical than others, and some printers only produce books in certain sizes. The horizontal format chosen for this book relates to the landscape format (below) The extra page width in a horizontal publication easily accommodates multiple images, explanatory text, and captions. Try leaving white space around an image to emphasize its object-like quality. vertical format (right) Vertical pages are the most familiar to readers. This format works well for showing one image per page with a caption underneath. You might also put all your images on the right page and captions on the left page. experience of walking through a gallery. The wide format also makes it easy to place two square or vertical images on a single page, while leaving plenty of room for captions. Designed by John P. Corrigan. 08_Exhibition.indd 99 5/23/08 9:47:31 AM | Indie Publishing100 DOCUMENTED PLACE designing a grid A grid consists of the columns and margins of your book as well as horizontal divisions. Designers use grids to create consistent yet varied pages, making their publications feel orderly and professional. They allow the designer to create many different layouts—you don’t have to stick everything in the middle of the page. To make a grid, begin by choosing how many columns your pages will have. Page layout programs such as InDesign will ask you to create columns when you open a new document. The grid shown here has five columns per page. Some elements, like captions, occupy just one column, while pictures and essays span multiple columns. This grid has five horizontal divisions as well as five vertical columns. The grid serves to anchor different types of information, such as headlines, captions, running heads, and page numbers (also called folios). The grid creates order while allowing elements to be placed in a dynamic, changing pattern. 08_Exhibition.indd 100 5/23/08 9:47:38 AM Exhibition Catalogs |101 image size and placement Each double-page spread of your book is a unit. Think about the relationship between the images on the left and right pages. Should each image be large or small? Do you need to show a detail of an image? Use the grid to determine both the size and position of images. Ignore the grid when you feel it’s necessary. Also think about how big to make your images. Some artists want to make each picture as large as possible on the page. Others want to suggest the scale of the actual art works by making some reproductions smaller than others. You may also wish to create contrast among images that is unrelated to the art work’s actual size. For example, you could come in close on a tiny painting and show off its details, or your could zoom out to represent a sculptural object in a larger environment. 08_Exhibition.indd 101 5/23/08 9:47:48 AM Grouping of pages and spreads contributing to the studio publication at MICA. The book was intended to showcase, educate, and inspire the process of book and publication design. Originally intended as and independent publication it was pick up and published by Princeton Architectural Press in the fall of 2008. The chapter that I developed was intended to illustrate some issues and design decisions that need to be considered in publishing an exhibition catalog. As a former director of a gallery I choose to author and design a catalog, and through this process include photographic editing with the purpose of a publication. I created a vertical and horizontal orientation (seen above) as a way to illustrate the choice of publication format relative to subject matter and intent.
  • | 123 NO NEGATIVE Photographic works by Jerome Page Tobias  CENTRAL AIR NOMADIC ART SPACE Photographs by Jerome Page Tobias Curated and Edited by John P. Corrigan Copyright © 2007 John P. Corrigan All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher OR SEND A LETTER TO: Central Air Nomadic Art Space 3302 E. Baltimore Street Baltimore, Maryland 21224 U.S.A COVER PHOTOGRAPH COON Coon Rapids, Minnesota 1996 THIS PAGE PONY Assateague S.P. Maryland 1998 PREVIOUS PAGE TIDE Assateague S.P. Maryland 1998 NO NEGATIVE PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK BY Jerome Page Tobias CENTRAL AIR NOMADIC ART SPACE PAGES 2-3 Independently published photographic art book featured in the upcoming GD MFA studio project INDIE PUBLISHING, Princeton Architectural Press, 2008. PROJECT SUMMARY  CENTRAL AIR NOMADIC ART SPACE FOREWORD All of the images in this exhibition were created using a Polaroid Land Camera. The photographs have been left unaltered, full framed and reflect a single moment. Using the immediacy of the Polaroid one knows whether the image is to be kept, or destroyed. NO NEGATIVE //  Central Air: Nomadic Art Space began in 1999. Initially started as Radiator Art Exhibition Company, with co-founder Lee Anne Swanson, its mission was to create a collective art space allowing founding members to exhibit and promote their work as well as the works of like minded artists. Radiator radically provided an exhibition space for group shows as well as thematic artist pairings. Radiator looked to reinvigorate the exhibition options in Minneapolis. Central Air was the next generation. I wanted to curate a scene or happening. I wanted to publish the collective findings in a thematic publication representing the involvement of multiple disciplined contributor’s. The nomadic essence of an art exhibition represents itself perfectly in a publication, avoiding the gallery atmosphere altogether. The context for No Negative came from the realization that these Polaroid images, taken by Jerome Page Tobias from 1992-1997, remain the only documentation of his experience with these seemingly obscure places. Jerome is repeatedly drawn to architectural anomalies, as well as his interaction with and memory of these places. These photographs identify obscure landmarks without direct reference. Yet Jerome can actively identify the moment and placement of each photograph. This collection celebrates the chosen limitations of using a Polaroid Land Camera. The photographic medium of the Polaroid, unlike any other camera, relies on the moment of observation. The final image implies the informal documentation of fleeting time. Polaroid images appear small, frail, and delicate in comparison to other photographic formats. The moments between the click of the shutter and the peeling of the emulsion paper consist of hope and anticipation; this represents itself in the final presentation of the image. The images of this photographic exhibition are snap shots of specific places at specific moments. The photographs are grouped according to repeated interest, and represent the collected memories of both place and space. I. DOCUMENTED PLACE NO NEGATIVE //  FREE HBO Minneapolis, Minnesota 1995 3 CENTRAL AIR NOMADIC ART SPACE DEER ISLE Deer Isle, Maine 1994 NO NEGATIVE // 33 DRIVE IN Deer Isle, Maine 1994 0 CENTRAL AIR NOMADIC ART SPACE WATCH TOWER Minneapolis, Minnesota 1996 NO NEGATIVE // 1 TANGLE TOWN Minneapolis, Minnesota 1996 8 CENTRAL AIR NOMADIC ART SPACE BRICK x BRICK Minneapolis, Minnesota 1994 NO NEGATIVE //  PAGES 32-33 PAGES 50-51 PAGES 54-55 PAGES 8-9 PAGES 4-5
  • | 125 BOOKS LIE The NonSequential Power: The dis-order of pages TITLE BOOKS LIE DIS - THE NON-SEQUENTIAL POWER // THE ORDER OF PAGES PAGE [ 32 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 33 ] (+) THIS IS [ A + B ] (42)THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 42 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 43 ] PAGE [ 62 ] [ 63 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 2 ] [ 3 ] TITLE BOOKS LIE THE NON-SEQUENTIAL POWER // THE ORDER OF PAGES DIS - (2)THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 2 ] [ 1 ] THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 1 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 1 ] >> EMPTY << PAGE [ 4 ] [ 5 ] PAGE [ 8 ] [ 23 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 10 ] THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 11 ] Ongoing research and Future publication of Central Air :: Nomadic Art Space PROJECT SUMMARY This book is in continuous development — examining the restructuring of personal sketchbook pages. My personal sketchbooks, created over the past fifteen years, includes hand lettering, photographs, drawings, observances, and the written word. This book restructures sketches and pages combined over several page spreads. BOOKS LIE >> EMPTY << [ A ] THIS IS PAGE [ 22, 23 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 40 ] [ 41 ] PAGE [ 20 ] THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 21 ] (28)THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 28 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 29 ] PAGE [ 44 ] THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 45 ] Continued from page 40. (56)THIS IS NOT PAGE [ 56 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 57 ] (46)THIS IS PAGE [ 47A ] THISIS PAGE[47B] PAGE [ 58 ] MOVE THIS PAGE [   ] [ 65 ] THIS IS PAGE [ 64 ] PAGE [ 26 ] [ 27 ] [ B ]
  • | 127 Working Title: LET’S ALL DRIVE REALLY FAST AND KILL EACH OTHER byJeromePageTobias s h o r t s t o r i e s Short Stories by Jerome Page Tobias Book CoversPROJECT SUMMARY Two proposed book cover options and future publication of collected short storie(s) by Jerome Page Tobias. The book remains in the initial stage of development. byJeromePageTobiasshortstories
  • | 129 Event graphics; banners and catalogue for WB International Awards Ceremony WORLD BANK AWARDS CEREMONY DESIGN OFFICE: CKS Washington D.C. 1997 Nomination Awards Ceremony publication brochure World Bank Nomination Awards For Excellence Ceremony event graphics and publication brochure
  • | 131 WORLD BANK AWARDS CEREMONY Nomination announcement brochureDESIGN OFFICE: CKS Washington D.C. 1997
  • | 133 YOUTH FARM AND MARKET PROJECT Volunteered design time, services and resources. Designed WHAT’S SPROUTIN’, seasonal newsletter for volunteers, corporate sponsors, area supporters, family and friends of Youthfarmers. The look and feel of newsletter had to incorporate the vastness of Minneapolis area youth. With neighbors and outreach among the Latino, Somalian, Hmong, and African American youth, it had to be playful enough to represent the youth yet appear to potential donors as the great organization that YouthFarm continues to be. The newsletter was also designed for the future installments to be created by the farmers themselves. Summer 2002 Newsletter Late Fall 2002 Newsletter Summer 2003 Newsletter PROJECT SUMMARY
  • | 135 1300 mount royal avenue baltimore, maryland, 21217 www.mica.edu BEYOND THE COMPASS BEYOND THE SQUARE FRONT COVER BACK COVER 2007-2008 EXHIBITION DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR PROJECT SUMMARY EXHIBITION DESCRIPTION Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square, an exhibition installed in Mount Vernon Place, was conceived and curated by students in MICA’s Exhibition Development Seminar. Inspired by and exploring themes of The Walters Art Museum’s Maps: Finding Our Place in the World, it is a component of Baltimore’s city-wide Festival of Maps. Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square features contemporary art by 10 emerging MICA artists that is interactive, explores new and abstract ways of understanding historical mapping concepts, and reflects myriad approaches to mapping and way-finding. Tours, lectures, activities, and educational programs for all ages enhance the exhibition experience. for further information and exhibitiion highlights www.mica.edu/beyond March 16 through May 20 2oo8 mount vernon place 600 north charles street baltimore maryland 21201 mount vernon place ca. 1894-1906 courtesy of the maryland historical society site-specific works by students in the maryland institute college of art class conversations as muse, curated and organized by mica’s exhibition development seminar, inspired by and exploring themes of baltimore’s city-wide festival of maps. Typically, when we think of maps we think of tools that help us get from one point to another. Cartographers and other professional map makers invented systems of symbols to use in the process of mapping the world, to help convey its meaning to others. Now, the accessibility of information in our contemporary digital age has globalized communication and science as much as it has influenced the creative process. Due to rapid advances in technology, such as satellite imaging, contemporary maps need not rely on codes and symbols, and instead could use solely automated, photographic imaging to help you find your way. Maps no longer rely on this ornamentation, yet the ornamentation remains—inspiring a body of artwork with its roots in the tradition of symbols and evolution of mapping. Now there is a choice when deciding to adorn a map or to map by means of art. Whether that choice is made by an artist or a map-maker, that choice is imbued with artistic intent. While science analyzes the world and creates a map to aid our intellectual and physical understanding, art attempts to synthesize these analyses with our own experiences to produce something entirely its own. mount vernon place landscape of baltimore from the top of the baltimore washington monument, february 2008. CONTEMPORARY ART & MAPPING In the form of a scavenger hunt, exploring mount Vernon plaCe by Um-Gi Lee examines late 19th and early 20th century architectural treasures around Mount Vernon Place. Across from special architectural and historic sites are miniatures of key buildings visible from Mount Vernon Place. Installed alongside these models are stamps and miniature maps. Participants can take a card and visit each place indicated on the card to collect a stamp and learn about basic aspects of the historic architecture in the neighborhood. lee B. Freeman is a senior interdisciplinary sculpture major. A native of New York City, he recently spent several months traveling through Europe and North Africa. His artwork is informed by his experience in a place and his observations of and reactions to his surroundings. Much of his work straddles the boundary between the obvious and the overlooked. Lee is always investigating and questioning the context of the site in which he works and has used Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square to further his interest in creating art which is in reaction and relation to its surroundings. Framing mount Veron plaCe is a gold chain link fence that will wrap the four squares of Mount Vernon Place. This project, by artist Lee B. Freeman, has three main actions. The first action is to deny access to this public space while simultaneously surrounding it in a golden frame. This action will force the public to step back and consider the facets that make up this complex space. In the second act the fence gates open, timed with the opening of the Walter Art Museum’s exhibit Maps: Finding Our Place in the World. The third action is the removal of the fence, revealing Mount Vernon Place as a stage for the exciting exhibition Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square. Freeman vastly shifts the space, presenting an opportunity to “re-see” this important park in a dialogue which speaks to this timeless social ground. um-gi lee is a Korean-born senior studying conceptual sculpture and model- making. After two years of study at the Korean National University of the Arts, she came to MICA to study sculpture and 3D design. Um-Gi’s studio work regularly engages concepts of scale and time. She is also deeply interested in exploring her identity as an Asian woman practicing art in a Western world. She credits her parents, a cartoonist and animator, for her interest and talent in the arts. exploring mount vernon place represents five buildings of mount vernon place in miniature. participants use a passport- like card to collect a stamp at each model. framing mount vernon place a gold chain link fence will temporarily frame the four quadrants of mount vernon place. an opportunity to re-see and re-consider the space. right, leFt, or straight consists of small spherical maps by Emma Fowler that invite viewers to embark on an adventure. They are designed with lines and grooves, signifying paths, peaks and valleys in a geography that exists only in the psyche of the viewer. Instead of designated roads on a route to a specific location, the balls take the viewer on a journey with limitless end points. These map balls propose that traveling without designated roads alters psychological and emotional connections to the places around us, and suggests new ways of navigating within our space. emma Fowler is a sophomore ceramics major from Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Her current studio work pushes the relationship between performance and ceramics. She also is interested in sound and has incorporated it into her investigations. Emma enjoys exploring Baltimore, as well as many other Eastern Seaboard cities, as a way to discover and learn from the history of the places around her. maCKenzie peCK is a junior general fine arts major from Danbury, Connecticut. Her paintings and multimedia work explore abstractions of the figure and have been featured in the MICA Juried Undergraduate Exhibition in 2005 and 2006, and in the 2007 York Arts Emerging Visions Undergraduate Student Exhibition. While focused on her artwork and studio practice, she is also interested in library science, athletics, physics, and politics. Recently, she traveled to Cabo Verde in Africa to study and work as a teaching assistant at the Center for Creative Youth’s cultural exchange program. She plans to attend the AICAD New York Studio Program in Brooklyn for one semester. the parK, a video installation, by MacKenzie Peck, re-examines the ways in which Mount Vernon Place may be perceived. It asserts that maps can be understood as documents created in order to present information about a space, resulting in an expanded awareness of the location. Like a map, the installation expands the viewer’s understanding of this historical landmark by elaborating on conventional mapping. Because human perception cannot be transferred, all people will not perceive a site the same way. Peck promotes shifts in perception with a silent black and white video that is rooted in the life and natural rhythms of Mount Vernon Place, allowing the viewer to reflect on the space, how they move through it and how others may perceive that shared experience. MacKenzie peck wishes to thank donald hicken, baltimore school for the arts tolly wright, actor the park maps the routine of one person walking in mount vernon place. right, left, or straight an open-ended, self-guided journey using a ceramic ball to navigate any space. In the exhibition Beyond the Compass, Beyond the square, 10 artists from Maryland Institute College of Art enter into a dialogue with an historic urban site—Mount Vernon Place. The exhibition is part of the city-wide Festival of Maps celebration, which was initiated by The Walters Art Museum’s exhibition, Maps: Finding our Place in the World. The conceptual starting point for the works of art installed in Mount Vernon Place reflects the tradition of map making, represented in the Walters exhibition, which asserts that maps help find your place in world. While typically used as tools for navigation, maps can also be used to document history as well as creative and scientific exploration. It is CURATORIAL STATEMENT because of this versatility that they provide a rich starting point for artistic inquiry. Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square is organized around two central mapping themes: how maps contextualize and provide an opportunity to explore our place in the world; and how concepts of mapping can bridge disparate communities through a shared notion of place. Some pieces in the exhibit attempt to expose the desire to find our place in the world by drawing attention to emotions relative to place. Others attempt to subvert traditional way-finding by utilizing unexpected tools, playing with scale, engaging communities to collaboratively create works of art, or reframing a mundane act of walking through a park into an interactive art experience. In curating an exhibition of contemporary art in Mount Vernon Place, we have had to navigate the politics of our ‘gallery,’ a prized historic landmark. Creation and curation were simultaneous processes, an intellectual collaboration between creative minds striving to respect the legacy of mapping and the imprint of history, both of which inspire and form the experience of our environment. Understandably, by creating and showcasing interactive reinterpretations of the history of mapping, these works add new and sometimes subversive voices to a public arena. That voice is a struggle for power, a struggle that has always been the essence of this site, symbolized in the Revolutionary War’s fight for freedom. It is that voice Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square hopes to amplify now, juxtaposed with this historic site, along the quest to find our place. this statement was written by the exhibition development seminar’s curatorial team. members of all teams, and their mentors are listed in the acknowledgements page Beyond the Compass, Beyond the square was organized by the students of two Maryland Institute College of Art classes—the Exhibition Development Seminar and Conversation as Muse. Inspired by The Walters Art Museum’s concurrent exhibition, Maps: Finding Our Place in the World, the artworks installed in the four parks of Mount Vernon Place explore new and abstract ways of understanding and experiencing maps and way-finding. Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square is the first exhibit to be installed in the historic parks. Utilizing the rare opportunity to install their work off-campus, students created a site- specific exhibition using themes conceived within the walls of a museum and brought a contemporary perspective on those themes to a space accessible to a wider audience. The eighteen students of the Exhibition Development Seminar started the project by examining mapping concepts and themes through time and place, and then by researching contemporary artists using mapping in their work. Students used the seven themes of the museum exhibition as a springboard for discussion. The themes of way-finding, mapping the world, mapping historical events, visualizing nature and society, mapping imaginary worlds, and consuming maps led to investigations by which the students developed the framework for their exhibit. Through this initial work, they began to assert their individual visions and also develop a common thematic framework for their contemporary exhibition. Key to the learning experience of the students, as well as to the completion of the project, was the formulation of six working teams that performed the essential functions of their museum and professional counterparts. The Exhibit Design team brainstormed and researched exhibition development seminar CLASS STATEMENT inventive ways to install the works in the four parks of Mount Vernon Place and creatively address the issues surrounding public exhibitions and the historic significance of the parks. The Graphic Design team established the graphic identity, press visuals, and catalogue and collaborated with The Walters to create a “Map of Maps” to highlight the exhibition spaces inside and outside of the museum. The Education team developed programs to supplement the exhibition and engage audiences of all ages as well as teachers, students, artists, and visitors from Baltimore and beyond. The Website team worked to build the structure of the exhibit’s website and created a resource that serves as an interactive tool and archive for the artists. The Management team functioned as a resource for their peers and a liaison between the students, The Walters Art Museum, MICA, the Festival of Maps, and many other participants in and supporters of the exhibit. Each team took on traditional as well as innovative and extraordinary roles. By doing so, they brought together the student artists, the surrounding communities, MICA, The Walters Art Museum, and other institutions and individuals participating in the Festival of Maps. For the MICA students, developing Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square was an exciting opportunity to create work for a broad public audience and to experience for themselves the work of museum and exhibition professionals. this statement was written, with extensive input from the entire exhibition development seminar, by the management team. miChael ries is a senior interactive media major from Baltimore, Maryland. Prior to returning to school to further his art education, he worked as a full time network engineer, and now specializes in new media and technology. His work engages technology as a medium with which he can achieve his artist vision. Through his work he hopes to expose the myth of the omnipotence of the computer and to demonstrate that our senses lead us to interpret our world. Michael has participated in the 2007 Enzimi Festival in Rome and the 2006 Jetlag: Traveling Art exhibition in Seoul, South Korea. resonanCe is an interactive sculpture by Michael Ries and Dana Solano that uses cell phones, the sound properties of resonance, and interactivity to invite Baltimoreans to think about themselves in relationship to their environment. The resonator contains a speaker that will play a tone and a plate that will create visual patterns in sand through vibrations. Participants will hear a series of questions that will map the caller’s emotional state by calling a phone number provided at the site. The resonator represents a single idea within this series, and the tone created by the resonator will be a translation of the participant’s answers to the questions. Depending on those answers, the tones played will create either harmonious resonances or disharmonious cacophonies, both audibly and visually. dana solano is a senior interactive media major from Chester Township, New Jersey. Dana’s work largely focuses on themes of identity. Dana has participated in a number of exhibitions and has shown Theft and Rescue, a collaborative work dealing with psycho- geography, on a number of occasions. It has been a part of several festivals including the Conflux Festival in Brooklyn, and the Enzimi festival in Rome. Dana’s professional experience revolves around web design and includes working with Chrysallis, a portfolio company involved with the growth of brands in health and beauty, as well as the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore. michael and dana wish to thank ryan holsopple, 31 down radio theater, http://31down.org (31down.org) brooklyn, new york for programming and technical advice netlogic, llc. bethesda, md resonance uses interactive technology that through tonal sounds visually map the participant’s emotions. this image is of possible chladni patterns that can be created in sand as a result of a tone resonating through a sheet of metal. Jonathan tauBe is a sophomore interdisciplinary sculpture major. Originally from Covington, Louisiana, Jonathan’s work relates to his experience in Hurricane Katrina when communities came together to clean and rebuild the streets of New Orleans. Jonathan addressed the redevelopment of Covington in his 2006 solo show Post Katrina Growth in which he sowed pounds of salt, along the side of a highway, into construction sites intended for strip malls. He is extremely interested in performance art, public art, and theories of social sculpture. Presently, he focuses on the social potential of Baltimore by working to bridge divisions within the city. Baltimore sweep aCtion: towards the Center is a cross-neighborhood project by Jonathan Taube that engages four distinct communities in the cleansing action of sweeping, participants perform a gesture counter to the expanding motion of gentrification. Pushing trash towards the center, participants will celebrate civic pride and crossing boundaries while being drawn towards Mount Vernon Place. The resulting trash is displayed openly to demonstrate the point that our social and environmental problems might be solved if we face them together and the viewer is confronted with a monumental relic of community collaboration. a monument to collective effort community leaders will create a monument of brooms to a collective civic effort. the debris collected in the sweep from the respective routes will be installed in the base of the monument. Boundary BloCK party is an event that will bring neighborhoods in West Baltimore together to celebrate and share their unique cultures. The Boundary Block Party takes place on Saturday, April 19, 1-4 p.m. in the median park at the corner of Eutaw and McMechen Streets. Artists, educators, and community members will work collaboratively to plan the event. Hoping to bring distinctive neighborhoods together to share and build relationships and make permanent contributions to the public spaces, they will install community art projects made at the block party in each neighborhood. Artist Rebecca Nagle will work with others at the block party on a project to replace and decorate new wood planks to rehabilitate local park benches. new outFits places decorative cloaks made by communities in Baltimore over the monuments in the parks of Mount Vernon Place. These decorative cloaks temporarily re-dress the monuments of John Eager Howard, Roger B. Taney, Severn Teackle Wallis, General Lafayette, and George Peabody. New Outfits were made in workshops by diverse groups of Baltimore community centers and resident groups, in which the artist, Rebecca Nagle, acted as an educator and a facilitator. New Outfits gives people access to the power that the monuments symbolize. reBeCCa nagle is a senior fiber major from Joplin, Missouri, working in video, new media, performance, and community art. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally and was recently featured at the Conflux Festival in Brooklyn, New York and in the permanent collection of the Ssamzie Museum in Seoul, South Korea, where her work remains in a permanent collection. Rebecca was a part of the team that designed and produced the 2007 exhibition At Freedom’s Door: Challenging Slavery in Maryland at the Maryland Historical Society and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum. Her interactive works engage viewers with issues of intimacy, the body, community, and power dynamics. new outfits baltimore city forestry department blank’s fabrics walters art museum staff involved in new outfits house of ruth rose street community center creative alliance mica’s, performance garment class rebecca nagle wishes to thank block party baltimore city department of recreation and parks, warren rowley midtown community benefits district madison park improvement association marble hill community association mount royal improvement association neighbors of contee-parago park resident action committee pennsylvania avenue redevelopment collaborative park sisters together and reaching shie’rees saunders antoine bennett george gilliam charlie johnson lee bowers carolyn defastch roxanne thomas pauline squirrel evette moore jonathan haun jaon davis jean cole matthew tuttle rachel faller wishes to thank rachel nefcy, structural fabrication the davey tree expert company, wood chips community organizations: city springs elementry school violetville elementary school saturday academy program spinster yarn and fiber shop new outfits a rendering of what a cloak on john eager howard would look like the knitted bridge is a collaborative project by the artist and community organizations. the designs and colors are based upon maps and drawings created at these workshops. mapping history creative historian daniel allende hard at work in his study mapping history In order to map out the rich history of Mount Vernon Place, historian Daniel Allende has unearthed a bounty of historical documents, records, and primary sources. Mapping History utilizes his findings as the basis of informational plaques. Through Allende’s interpretive plaques, visitors are invited to discover a new way of understanding this ripe historic landmark. Plaques with an accompanying audio cell phone tour educate visitors about some of the unknown history of Mount Vernon Place, suggesting that history has multiple layers and is more than meets the eye. dan allende is a sophomore artist currently studying interdisciplinary sculpture, art education, and historical pursuits. His dedication to exploration and discovering uncharted spaces drives his interest in history. Dan is pleased to participate in Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square as an artist and historian. The exhibition has fueled his investigations into historical perspective and the many histories of Mount Vernon Place. Inspired by his expeditions throughout many regions of North America, Dan considers many elements of travel and exploration to be key to his practice. Nature, memory, and the preservation of historical records are themes prevalent in his work. the Knitted Bridge represents a community outreach endeavor in Baltimore by Rachel Faller and aims to encourage active participation by creating a structure that people can physically interact with. It is a steel structure with a suspended, knitted, rope bridge. The knitted section is the product of several knitting workshops taught in different areas in the city. After the completion of the rope bridge, the participants from the community are invited to paint the structure to complete the experience. The Knitted Bridge symbolizes the bridging of many communities in Baltimore, connecting with the themes of the exhibition in terms of how maps and geographic boundaries divide our communities and define us, and how extending beyond and crossing those boundaries is critical. raChel Faller is a senior fiber major from Boston, Massachusetts. She explores concepts of sustainability, social justice, and education inspired by volunteer work both at home and internationally. She has worked on community art projects with the Revolving Museum in Lowell, MA, at several community centers in Baltimore, and at MICA. After graduation, Rachel plans to work in an HIV clinic in Cambodia teaching women to make handmade textiles that will contribute to their livelihood. Additionally, she plans to pursue a graduate degree in community arts. exhibition design team: Sarah Elek Michelle Herman Katherine B. Nammacher Daniel Wallace Mentor: Glenn Shrum (Flux Studio) graphic design team: John P. Corrigan Jenn Julian Aaron Talbot Mentor: Gerry Greaney (Greaney Design) management team: Natasha Bunten Emily Macenko Mentor: George Ciscle web design team: Michael Milano Rachael Umbriano Mentor: Kevin Hoffman (MICA) Writing Mentor: Jennifer Wallace (MICA) EDS Video Archivist: Andy Shenker This project has been made possible through the generosity of the Baltimore Community Foundation, MICA’s Interdisciplinary Sculpture Department, the Walters Art Museum, and the Friends of the Exhibition Development Seminar. A special thanks goes to the Walter’s Art Museum staff including Gary Vikan, Greg Rago, Johanna Biehler, Terry Weisser, and especially Will Noel. Advice and guidance was provided by Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP), Friends of Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon Belvedere Association, and Baltimore City Parks and Recreation, in particular Jennifer Morgan. We are also indebted to MICA’s Communications and Development departments for their invaluable assistance. More information on Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square, including detailed project credits, extended essays, images, bios of team members, lesson plans and a blog can be found online at www.mica. edu/beyond. © Copyright Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, Maryland. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form by any means without the written permission of the artists or publisher. exhibition development seminar Instructor: George Ciscle (Curator-in-Residence, MICA) art education team: Imen Djouini Emily Peters Elena Rosemond Mentor: Emily Blumenthal (Walters Art Museum) curatorial team: Samantha Gainsburg Suzannah Gerber Leslie-Morgan Frederick Lisa Rigby Mentor: George Ciscle Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square has been developed and produced by students from MICA’s Exhibition Development Seminar in collaboration with artists from the Conversations as Muse studio course. artists Daniel Allende Rachel Faller Lee B. Freeman Emma Fowler Um-Gi Lee Rebecca Nagle MacKenzie Peck Michael Ries Dana Solano Jonathan Taube instructor: Jann Rosen-Quearlt (Interdisciplinary Sculpture Dept., MICA) ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Festival of Maps is made possible by a Festival of Maps Mini grant from a Fund of the Baltimore Community Foundation and the Baltimore Cultural Development Council. public programs CALENDAR OF EVENTS College night at the walters March 27 6-9 pm Walters Art Museum FREE admission, includes special exhibit Friday night at the walters March 28 5-8 pm Walters Art Museum FREE, does not include special exhibit Community Celebration For beyond the Compass, beyond the square March 29 1-4 pm Parks of Mount Vernon Place FREE, does not include special exhibit artist panel For beyond the Compass, beyond the square March 30 3 pm Brown Center, Falvey Hall, MICA FREE Teacher Tea Time: The world of Tea April 10 4.30-6.30 pm Walters Art Museum $10 For members, $15 for nonmembers, includes admission to special exhibit family fesTival of exploraTion April 12 11-4 pm Walters Art Museum FREE, includes special exhibit Boundary Block parTy April 19 1-4 pm Eutaw Place, at the corner of Eutaw and McMechen streets. FREE BlasT from The pasT: Time Travel Through film April 26 8 pm West Park of Mount Vernon Place FREE navigaTe This place: family scavenger hunT April 27 1-4 pm Parks of Mount Vernon Place and Walters Art Museum FREE EXHIBITION CATALOG Interior catalog pages
  • | 137 SAFETY FIRST Ephemera Collection BACK COVER FRONT COVER Research + Publication Design PROJECT SUMMARY Ephemeral research and publishing project proposed by MICA GD:MFA visiting artist Abbott Miller. The entire collection of first aid and red cross imagery is from my personal archives. Left Column: pages 2-8 Right Column: pages 9-15
  • N VACLUTCH // Typographic Annex | John’s fourteen diverse years of graphic design presents an array of design dedicated to the printed medium. As a freelance and studio designer John has made significant contributions in publishing, marketing, signage, packaging, and event graphics. His open attitude allows him to transition between corporate applications and print campaigns. He thrives on being an active team member in a collaborative and creative atmosphere. He believes in the process and methodology of design and its ability to approach any problem with creative solutions targeted towards the intended audience. John’s attention to typography presents a clear and stylistic approach to many effective forms of communication. 1:4 2:1 3:1 1:1
  • | SPECIFICATIONS PROJECT LISTING 141 ©2009 JOHN P. CORRIGAN. NovaClutch Typographic Annex. All rights reserved. TITLE Size W” x H” YEAR Description QUARTER ACRE LIFESTYLE MONUMENTS (Size from left to right) 12” x 16” x 2”, 10.5” x 15” x 2” 8” x 12” x 5”, 12” x 17” x 2.5” 2007 Three color screen printing on stone monuments ROSALUX artist promotions Neography 18” x 24”, 6” x 4.25” 2004 Neither Here Nor Then 11” x 17”, 6” x 4.25” 2005 Exhibition announcement posters and postcards CRAIG BEDDOW : Architect Stationary System 2004 Letterhead, Business card, envelope DALE TREMAIN : Architect IDENTITY CASE STUDY 2004 Logo development and concepts, stationary system Letterhead, business card, envelope SCHROEDER MILK PACKAGING Design Office: Bamboo, Minneapolis 2001 Milk packaging design for simplyright, a rBST hormone free milk class offering from Schroeder; 1/2 gallon carton, 1/2 gallon plastic Designed branding logo simplyright from Schroeder, in coordination with Kathy Sorranno whole, skim, one, two DESIGN LANGUAGE STUDIO POSTER 20” x 30” 2006 Digital photography, collage, non-digital film collage, photography, illustration SECTION ONE GRAPHIC DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS PROJECT LISTING LEE ANNE SWANSON artist promotions 6” x 4.25” Landscape 1996-2002 (assorted) Promotional and exhibition announcement postcards NATIONAL PORTFOLIO DAY POSTER 18” x 24” 2007 Unused poster designs for MICA BROADSIDES 12” x 17” 2007 Letterpress, screen print CENTRAL AIR :: NOMADIC ART SPACE CURATOR The Mayor of Uptown 2007 Curation, Art Direction: postcards, press release, exhibition design RADIATOR ART EXHIBITION COMPANY CURATOR 6” x 14.25” 1999-2002 Exhibition postcards IVY LOUNGE CURATOR 4.25” x 6”; 8.5” x 11” 2006 Curated artist exhibitions, postcards, press release Marketing and Sale announcement cards NEW VIEWS POSTER SUBMISSIONS POSTER 20” x 30” 2008 MS. MATCHED photographic collage 19” x 13.9” 2005 Self generated photographic/text prints
  • | SPECIFICATIONS PROJECT LISTING 143 ©2009 JOHN P. CORRIGAN. NovaClutch Typographic Annex. All rights reserved. ANXIETY 11”x 17” Fall 2006 Constructed lettering Adobe Illustrator WRITING, LETTERING, TYPE EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY Writing, lettering, and type treatments to compare and contrast multiple masthead designs for fashion magazine UBER_MAGAZINE MASTHEAD 8.5” x 11” Fall 2006 Brush, pen and ink, Turner ƒ. Fontographer, Adobe Illustrator CONSTRUCTED LETTERING EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY An examination of the relationship of constructed type and image FLAT_CATALOG PAGE SAMPLES TYPE DESIGN 8” x 10” Fall 1998 Type design—lettering Magazine design; interior page spreads Adobe InDesign, Photoshop BORROWED TYPE EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY An examination of the relationship of constructed type and image rendered to a 3-D package ZHE_BIRCH SODA LOGOTYPE AND PACKAGE DESIGN Fall 2006 Digital photography, collage, non-digital film collage, Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop NUMERALS TYPE DESIGN 20”x 30” Fall 2006 Typeface (Sovada ƒ) Poster design and typeface (numerals only 0-9) Font Lab, Adobe InDesign MODULAR TYPOGRAPHY TYPE DESIGN 11” x 17” Fall 2006 Typeface (Glen Burnie ƒ) and poster design Font Lab, Adobe Illustrator TURNER ƒ TYPE DESIGN Circa 1996, 2002 Full character set; regular, oblique Fontographer, Font Lab TURNER ƒ 2002 Fontographer, Font Lab, Adobe Illustrator Extended character set, paragraph sample, side bear- ing, and kerning pairs. SECTION TWO TYPOGRAPHY + TYPE DESIGN TITLE Size W” x H” YEAR Description HIGH CONTRAST HIERARCHY STUDIES 8” x 8” (1-3) Fall 2006 Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign A series of typographic sketches used as educational examples in the manipulation of typographic hierarchy. HIGH CONTRAST HIERARCHY STUDIES 8” x 8” (4, 5) Fall 2006 Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign Maryland Institute College of Art MFA studio book project GRAPHIC DESIGN: THE NEW BASICS, edited by Ellen Lupton. TYPE SPECIMEN TYPE DESIGN 11” x 17” 2009 LEFT: SOLINN RIGHT: PEPA STICK (digitized ink) Fontographer TYPE SPECIMEN TYPE DESIGN 11” x 17” 2009 LEFT: SWANNY RIGHT: ETCHING CAPS Fontographer TYPE SPECIMEN TYPE DESIGN 11” x 17” 2009 LEFT: TRACTION OVERHEAD-REG RIGHT: TRACTION OVERHEAD-LIGHT Fontographer TYPE SPECIMEN TYPE DESIGN 11” x 17” 2009 LEFT: GLEN BURNIE RIGHT: BANK BULBS, FAST BANK Font Lab, Fontographer TYPOGRAPHIC SPECIMEN SHEET TYPE DESIGN 1994-2006 Fontographer, Font Lab, Adobe Illustrator Digital typeface and font design Pepa Stick Swanny Vinyl Sólinn Bank Bulbs, Fast Bank Etching CAPS Traction Overhead_Light Traction Overhead_Normal Glen Burnie Sovada (numerals Only) SUBTLE CONTRAST HIERARCHY STUDIES 12” x 12” Fall 2006 Illustrator, InDesign A series of typographic sketches used as educational examples in the manipulation of typographic hierarchy adding elements of layering and grid. SUBTLE CONTRAST HIERARCHY STUDIES 12” x 12” Fall 2006 Illustrator, InDesign Maryland Institute College of Art MFA studio book project GRAPHIC DESIGN: THE NEW BASICS, edited by Ellen Lupton.
  • SPECIFICATIONS PROJECT LISTING 145 ©2009 JOHN P. CORRIGAN. NovaClutch Typographic Annex. All rights reserved. TITLE Size W” x H” YEAR Description BOB’S JAVA HUT signage 2004 Applied logo and exterior building graphics and redesigned interior to allow a cleaner and tighter space. Incorporated building tenants identities into exterior signage, to apply a cohesive building system. Designed advertising and marketing material for City Pages, and the Minnesota Motorcycle Monthly BEYOND THE COMPASS BEYOND THE SQUARE event graphics Banner 14’ x 19’ 2008 BYERLY’S signage LUND FOOD HOLDINGS Design Office: Bamboo, Minneapolis Pin style lettering 2001 Designed Byerly’s Minnesota Grille logo, Applied logo as restaurant signage BYERLY’S MENU DESIGN Design Office: Bamboo, Minneapolis 2001 Designed breakfast and dinner menu for Byerly’s Minnesota Grille. Menu design was intended to reference a city newspa- per, with captions and headlines to historically document each store, and when it opened. Menu page spreads. Front and back cover, pages 2-7 HISTORIC LEITHAUSER LOFTS CONDOMINIUMS signage Michlitsch Builders, Inc. Site Sign: 4’X 6’ 2(x) 2005 Designed large format marketing and informational signage and City of St. Paul development sign EUROPINE IMPORTS Exterior signage 2004 Store signage, consisting of back-lit dimensional boxes, as well as vinyl graphics of service categories Marketing Collateral 2004–2006 Seasonal marketing postcards, distributed from mailing list and customer inquiries 2006 Minneapolis St. Paul Magazine, March Home and Garden, 1/2 Vert Ad Space CR(EAT)E CATERS signage 2007 Established logo and identity system for Cr(eat)e Ca- tering and the Dining Studio for Chef Philip Dorwart Signage sketch, Side by side banner graphics. Cr(eat)e, The Dining Studio logo; Cr(eat)e caters logo SECTION THREE SIGNAGE | BALTIMORE URBAN FOREST BANNER 3’ x 17’ 2007 Banner proposal, submission, sponsorship, and installation WORLD BANK AWARDS CEREMONY BANNER GRAPHICS Design Office: CKS—Washington D.C. 1997 Designed event graphics, banners and a catalogue for WB International Awards Ceremony DIMENSIONAL TYPOGRAPHY Proposal / Study 1996 Dimensional type study examining quantitative information graphic application to three-dimensional structure reinforcing its content.
  • | SPECIFICATIONS PROJECT LISTING 147 ©2009 JOHN P. CORRIGAN. NovaClutch Typographic Annex. All rights reserved. TITLE Size W” x H” YEAR Description THE FLAMINGO’S SOCKS: HORACIO QUIROGA’S FABLE publication DESIGN 5.5” x 8.5” 2008 Work created for visiting artists Steven Farrell, project involved grafting a fable with a non-related knowledge domain, recreating a secondary narrative structure where the narrative arch, and domain are both visible. GRAPHIC EXPRESSION OF INTERNMENT book DESIGN 13” x 11” Spring 2008 MFA Thesis Publication ANTI-SEMITIC PROPAGANDA book DESIGN 8.5” x 11” 2007 Research Publication TYPE + CODE: PROCESSING FOR DESIGNERS book DESIGN 8.5” x 8.5” © 2009 Managing editor, book design ARTISTS SPACE BOOK book DESIGN 8.5” x 11” 1998 Book design; interior page spreads INDIE PUBLISHING: Exhibition Catalogs book DESIGN 7” x 8.5” Princeton Architectural Press, 2008 Instructional tutorial and case study NO NEGATIVE book DESIGN 9” x 7” Landscape 2007 Black and white Polaroid Land Camera BOOKS LIE: THE NONSEQUENTIAL POWER: THE DIS-ORDER OF PAGES book DESIGN 9” x 6” Portrait 2008 This book is in continuous development — examining the restructuring of personal sketchbook pages. The book restructures sketches and pages combined over several page spreads. Working title: LETS ALL DRIVE REALLY FAST AND KILL EACH OTHER book DESIGN 9” x 6” Portrait 2010 Two proposed book cover options and future publication of collected short storie(s) by Jerome Page Tobias. The book remains in the initial stage of development. SECTION FOUR BOOK + PUBLICATION DESIGN WORLD BANK publication DESIGN DESIGN OFFICE: CKS—Washington D.C. 1997 Call for submissions; Award ceremony event graphics YOUTH FARM publication DESIGN 14” x 8.5” Tri-fold legal size 2002-2003 Newsletter BEYOND THE COMPASS BEYOND THE SQUARE publication DESIGN Catalog 5.5”x 8.5” 2008 SAFETY FIRST: EPHEMERA COLLECTION Research + Publication Design 10” x 10” 2006 Ephemeral research and publishing project proposed by MICA GD:MFA visiting artist Abbott Miller. The entire collection of first aid and red cross imagery is from my personal archives.